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  • Do you carry this in your pack

    Interesting stuff it seems this would be a no brainer

    Dwight



    http://www.amazon.com/Ever-Ready-Fir...owViewpoints=1

  • #2
    Nope .......
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

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    • #3
      Another nope here...

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      • #4
        Absolutely YES. A couple Israeli bandages and a tourniquet (C-A-T) are mandatory for all off-road adventures. You'll want some of both the 4" and 6" sizes.
        Winter is Coming...

        Go GeocacheAlaska!

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        • #5
          Being a medic I always carry in my day pack a field first aid kit with small trauma blood stoppers and a other misc items. And in my atv box a have a bigger kit and in the truck a really big kit. In all my time in the woods I have used my kits only a couple times mainly on small cuts or basic first aid related. It's one of those things better to have it and not need it then not have it and really need it.

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          • #6
            Smaller one and quik clot for long trips only.
            "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

            Edwin Hubble

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            • #7
              No, but the emergency kit has Quik Clot, some gauze, tampons (for broad-head wounds) and other goodies.

              Patriot Life Member NRA
              Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
              Life Member Disabled American Veterans


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              • #8
                Yes, I have the 6" in my survival E&E bag.
                "Essential......to Prepping for Survival, is to be able to segregate, what you think will happen, from what you hope will happen, from what you fear will happen, from what is happening".

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                • #9
                  Kinda. It's just gauze, so in a way, yeah, I have some with me.

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                  • #10
                    No. I carry quik clot and a bloodstopper bandage with tape.

                    Even better....take a Wilderness First Responder (WFR) course.

                    There are many offered in AK, with AK specifics in mind. Deb is renown in the field and is a local. Highly recommended.

                    http://www.safetyed.net/wildernessmedicine.html

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                    • #11
                      No for me, but I have a medium size first aid kit in my tent, and carry a smaller one, plus a roll of Duct Tape.

                      Another poster mentioned Tampons above, which in fact can suck a lot of blood. But for compression bandages sanitary napkins are a great idea. You can hold it in place with medical tape, and if everything else fails, with Duct Tape

                      Want something stickier than duct tape? The red color tape used to close the gaps on the vapor barrier or insulation at your home. It's expensive, and when you pull it off your skin it will certainly remove your fur

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Frostbitten View Post
                        Kinda. It's just gauze, so in a way, yeah, I have some with me.
                        No, it's not "just gauze". The Israeli bandage is a gauze-wrapped cotton trauma pad attached to an elastic ACE-type wrap. The trick item that makes them really cool is the half-moon shaped plastic clamp that is attached to the wrap. The clip allows you to create a pressure dressing and apply a significant amount of pressure over the wound.

                        You can do the same thing with standard dressings, but you need 3 pieces to do it. You need the 5x9 trauma pad, a roll of 3" or 4" gauze, and a roll of 4" ACE wrap. Put the trauma pad on the wound. Put the roll of gauze on top of the trauma pad and directly over the wound. Now hold that in place while you use the ACE wrap to secure it all with moderate pressure. The bulk of the gauze roll creates the pressure point.

                        The advantage of the Israeli dressing is that it has everything in one vacuum package, taking up about 1/4 of the physical space of the other 3 items, and it costs less than the combined cost of those items. You can get the Israeli dressings in 3-packs for less than $20.

                        But aside from all that, the tourniquet is the real life saver. If you have notable bleeding (especially arterial) on an extremity, don't mess around and go straight for the tourniquet. After you have stopped the blood loss, deal with the wound itself. We've been doing it backwards for years. Tourniquets first and fast; high and tight.
                        Winter is Coming...

                        Go GeocacheAlaska!

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                        • #13
                          For those of us that don't know anything about this item: I found this clip on what the unit is and how to use it:

                          The Prepper Project.com "How to Treat a Traumatic Gunshot Wound"

                          Thanks for the heads up. I will be adding some of these to our first aid kits.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JOAT View Post
                            No, it's not "just gauze". The Israeli bandage is a gauze-wrapped cotton trauma pad attached to an elastic ACE-type wrap. The trick item that makes them really cool is the half-moon shaped plastic clamp that is attached to the wrap. The clip allows you to create a pressure dressing and apply a significant amount of pressure over the wound.

                            You can do the same thing with standard dressings, but you need 3 pieces to do it. You need the 5x9 trauma pad, a roll of 3" or 4" gauze, and a roll of 4" ACE wrap. Put the trauma pad on the wound. Put the roll of gauze on top of the trauma pad and directly over the wound. Now hold that in place while you use the ACE wrap to secure it all with moderate pressure. The bulk of the gauze roll creates the pressure point.

                            The advantage of the Israeli dressing is that it has everything in one vacuum package, taking up about 1/4 of the physical space of the other 3 items, and it costs less than the combined cost of those items. You can get the Israeli dressings in 3-packs for less than $20.

                            But aside from all that, the tourniquet is the real life saver. If you have notable bleeding (especially arterial) on an extremity, don't mess around and go straight for the tourniquet. After you have stopped the blood loss, deal with the wound itself. We've been doing it backwards for years. Tourniquets first and fast; high and tight.
                            Yeah, it is just gauze. I used and trained with these things for 20 years as a field medic in the military. It's a gauze pad with a way of securing it packaged in a plastic pouch. It does the same thing a wadded up t-shirt or sock will do when secured with and ace wrap or duct tape.

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                            • #15
                              OK. I guess your 20 years trumps my 24, since ya had the need to start dropping certs around. I bow to your wisdom. Nothing to see here folks. It's just gauze. The other parts are just a figment of your imagination. Move along.

                              Though I have to say (for the benefit of the lurkers, of course), Duct Tape and socks are NOT appropriate bandaging materials. But if you would rather carry a $12 roll of duct tape and a $10 pair of socks, all weighing in at over a pound, instead of a $7 Israeli dressing that weighs about 1.5oz, then go for it. Best of luck, and I hope you never get hurt in the woods.
                              Winter is Coming...

                              Go GeocacheAlaska!

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