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  • iofthetaiga
    replied
    Originally posted by SkinnyD View Post
    Originally posted by akgun&ammo View Post
    and maybe a human death do to curcumcises beyond yer control....
    I'm confused. :confused:
    Not sure the risk of death is especially high, but it's usually done at a very early age, thus, "beyond yer control".

    Does that help:question:

    Leave a comment:


  • cod
    replied
    Originally posted by Amigo Will View Post
    You know the parents can breed and survive and the calf has yet to prove themselfs. Think military where 17 years old can join and 18 go into combat. The best military would be folks from 25 to 45 but they are the future so we don't go that route.

    Ha!! Good one Will. We all know that folks 25-45 are already way too smart to do the foolish things in life like charge straight in to battle. That's why the young are needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Amigo Will
    replied
    You know the parents can breed and survive and the calf has yet to prove themselfs. Think military where 17 years old can join and 18 go into combat. The best military would be folks from 25 to 45 but they are the future so we don't go that route.

    Leave a comment:


  • akgun&ammo
    replied
    Skinny?

    Okay, I kan't spell very well since the stroke.. I git yer drift..

    Chris


    any body you know hit a moose with a car on icy roads?

    Leave a comment:


  • ERDucker
    replied
    Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
    According to the people who study this stuff for a living half of all calves alive in September do not survive their first winter.

    A large, single calf with mama has the highest chance of survival. Cows going into winter with twins tend to come out with just one, and a lone calf is probably a goner anyway.

    If it's legal, and a calf fits your needs? Enjoy your veal this winter.
    Taking a calf is a better management tool if there is a desire to increase populations. The chance of a mature cow surviving the winter is much higher than a calf, that alone should be enough to justify the hunt. In other areas of the world where moose are hunted, calves are hunted, same in in the lower 48.

    ADFG has a great article on this:

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...articles_id=52

    Leave a comment:


  • SkinnyD
    replied
    Originally posted by akgun&ammo View Post
    and maybe a human death do to curcumcises beyond yer control....
    I'm confused. :confused:

    Leave a comment:


  • Erik in AK
    replied
    According to the people who study this stuff for a living half of all calves alive in September do not survive their first winter.

    A large, single calf with mama has the highest chance of survival. Cows going into winter with twins tend to come out with just one, and a lone calf is probably a goner anyway.

    If it's legal, and a calf fits your needs? Enjoy your veal this winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • akgun&ammo
    replied
    lone calf on these road hunt areas should not warrent all the hate mail..

    A first year calve without Mama stands only a little chance at surviving.

    And most of that "survival" time would have to be near the road, so they can get around to feeding areas....

    leading more chances for vehicalur interaction.
    the main reason the road hunts are emplace, to reduce moose/vehicle colisions.

    Do I say go look for a calf? No.
    But, if the opertunity to eliminate suffering; and maybe a human death do to curcumcises beyond yer control....

    take the lone calf.. most will be in the 250-400 pound range, giving a fair start to your winter meat supply.

    Chris

    Leave a comment:


  • sambuck12
    replied
    Even if it were legal, not sure I would do it. I saw one a couple years ago an acquaintance took. I was less than impressed. He had to wipe the milk off its nose for the pic it was so small. I doubt he got much for meat. Maybe as much as a deer but no more. Let em grow I say.

    Leave a comment:


  • ERDucker
    replied
    Right from the regulations:

    Some male calves have a small amount of antler growth covered in hair and skin. These are still calves and are not legal in a spike, spike-fork, or antlered bull hunt. Male calves are only legal in antlerless, any moose, or any bull hunts that do not specifically prohibit the taking of calves.

    If it has no headgear and exterior plumbing, you are good to go. Stands to reason interior plumbing would be the same.

    Leave a comment:


  • anchskier
    replied
    As far as I know, if the specific hunt does not restrict the taking of a calf, then it would be legal. A calf (as long as it has not yet started growing antlers) would fall into the category of "antlerless". Like you said, some hunts do specify that taking of a calf or cow with a calf is illegal, but your hunt does not, so you should be good if you choose to do so.

    Leave a comment:


  • ERDucker
    replied
    Originally posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I have DM401 permit. It is antlerless. Some districts specifically call out that taking of a calf or a cow with calf is illegal. DM401 does not state that. Is it okay (legally) to harvest a calf? I'd not shoot a cow with a calf. I might shoot a yearling that is with a cow though - or maybe even a lone calf...but I would like more meat than that this year.

    I have had elk calf in the past and it was very good.
    That is interesting. My wife has the DM 410 permit and it specifically states calves are fair game, wonder why yours is silent. So if the regs do not prohibit the taking of calves or yearlings, and it does not have antlers, it should be fair game. That would definately warrant a phone call for F&G. No doubt that a yearling is fair game, calf is 12 months or less. A big yearling would be tasty.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bullelkklr
    started a topic taking a calf

    taking a calf

    I have DM401 permit. It is antlerless. Some districts specifically call out that taking of a calf or a cow with calf is illegal. DM401 does not state that. Is it okay (legally) to harvest a calf? I'd not shoot a cow with a calf. I might shoot a yearling that is with a cow though - or maybe even a lone calf...but I would like more meat than that this year.

    I have had elk calf in the past and it was very good.

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