Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sheep Survey being mailed out

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • trapperJ
    replied
    I'll definitely be filling this out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Meknowy
    replied
    This is great news. Thanks to everyone who put in time on this. I can't wait to get mine in the mail.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bear
    replied
    I hope everyone takes this seriously and takes the time to fill it out and return it . Todd put a lot of work into this and A lot of folks shared their time. Pretty important issues.

    Leave a comment:


  • bushrat
    replied
    Steve,

    Yeah, Todd sent out the first draft to the focus group members, and some of us sent back some comments on possible revisions, which I think he made. Hopefully most of the hunters who receive the survey will take the time to fill it out. According to what was presented at the Fbks BOG meeting, F&G and BOG were supposed to have results by October of this year. Not sure if that has changed or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • stid2677
    replied
    Thanks for your work on this Sir,, I have seen the draft survey and feel that it is well put together and will be a great tool if used properly.

    Leave a comment:


  • bushrat
    started a topic Sheep Survey being mailed out

    Sheep Survey being mailed out

    http://www.iab.uaf.edu/news/news_rel...release_id=118

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    15 May 2014

    FAIRBANKS, Alaska
    Concern over competition, crowding and conflict among Alaska sheep hunters, guides, transporters and nonresident hunters is being addressed by a University of Alaska Fairbanks survey of Dall sheep hunters.


    “An increasing number of proposals requesting changes to sheep hunting regulations have been submitted to the Alaska Board of Game in recent years,” said Todd Brinkman, project leader and a wildlife biologist with the UAF Institute of Arctic Biology. “Many of the proposals have noted conflict among resident and nonresident hunters, guides and transporters. This is something most sheep hunters in Alaska are aware of.”


    Many of the proposals have requested changes in hunting season dates and changes in the proportion of sheep tags allocated to nonresidents.


    Brinkman’s survey is designed to examine the issues, attitudes and behaviors of a large and representative cross-section of Alaska sheep hunters. Hunters are asked about their hunting patterns, how they feel about hunter competition and crowding, hunting season timing and the cost of resident and nonresident sheep tags, for example.


    “Because sheep hunters are interested and motivated and care a lot about this resource, I anticipate they’ll take the 20 to 30 minutes to do this,” Brinkman said.


    The survey will be sent to anyone, at least 18 years old who has hunted or received or applied for a hunting permit in the last five years.
    “I did a survey like this on Sitka black-tailed deer and on antlerless moose hunts in Interior Alaska and it helped to identify the extent of the central problems,” said Brinkman, whose research focuses on the human dimension of wildlife. “This survey should be able to tell us how the typical sheep hunter feels about the current situation and how it might be improved.”


    Brinkman conducted nearly 100 in-person focus-group discussions with sheep hunters, guides, transporters and sheep biologists from across Alaska (including Fairbanks, Tok, Palmer, Anderson, Healy, Glennallen, Wasilla and Anchorage), and held teleconferences with stakeholders in several communities off the road system to develop the survey. He expects the survey results to provide a resource for the Alaska Board of Game and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to use when developing regulations for the management and allocation of sheep.


    Postcards will be sent out the week of May 19 encouraging a few thousand hunters to complete the survey online. A mail-in option will also be available in early June for those who don’t complete the online version. A separate survey for guides, transporters and air taxis providing services to sheep hunters will be conducted in about a month. Participation is voluntary and respondents will be anonymous.
    Brinkman anticipates survey results will be available at area ADF&G offices and on their website in 2015.


    ADDITIONAL CONTACT:
    Todd Brinkman, assistant professor, Institute of Arctic Biology, Department of Biology and Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 907-474-7139,tjbrinkman@alaska.edu.

Footer Adsense

Collapse
Working...
X