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  • warning shot poll

    I have fired a warning shot in a wildlife encounter and the results of the warning shot were positive for the one time I have although I cant 100 percent say the results would have been the same if I had not fired a shot
    50
    Negative (animal became more aggressive or other negative)
    14.00%
    7
    Neutral (animal had no change)
    34.00%
    17
    Positive (animal responded as I wanted)
    52.00%
    26

  • #2
    Only tried it once myself, with a Sow Brown Bear, two cubs in tow,
    and I am pretty sure she only became more convinced that an aggressive approach to me was what she wanted to do.
    Did not slow her in the slightest. Lost the Deer she was interested in.

    Have watched another guy use it on Bear also, this one was just encountered on a trail, while packing Deer, and he took off running, tho he didn't run very far (maybe 50yds) and hung out in some Alders. while he passed through, sure didn't seem real effective, like the Bear was really run off very well.

    I don't believe in it myself, maybe too sharp a sound, not clear enough who you are ??
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    • #3
      I've had mixed results on two separate occasions. First one was a solo bear hunt in the late 80s. It was around midnight and I was skinning a bear when I had at least one other bear in the brush 30-40 yards away. I shot my .44 mag into the ground and the bear left. I quickly finished the job and left as well.

      The other was in the early 90s. We were in our tree stand, and had a small blackie on our bait site that simply wouldn't leave, yet we were already late to get home. We started talking, thinking the bear would startle and leave, but it just glanced at us a couple times and went about his business. We hollered at it, but no luck, the bear couldn't have cared less that we were there. My partner then fired his .338 into the ground. The bear ran about 10 yards but turned around and came right back in. We did this twice and the bear just wouldn't leave. At this point we discussed the fact that this bear had absolutely no fear of us and my partner decided to harvest the bear; a boar, about 5'5".

      Conclusion? The only sure way to get a bear out of the area is in your back pack.

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      • #4
        I had a small blackie that was following us gradually back off following a warning shot. Made my first hunting day in the state memorable.

        Comment


        • #5
          I will just offer up this for folks to consider.

          This spring I helped out with a hunter-ed class/course in Fbks. One of the things taught and heavily stressed is to know what's behind your target before shooting, and the dangers of shooting at skylined animals etc.

          Warning shots often pose this same danger when shooing past an animal, over its head etc. Another danger in a "warning" shot whereby attempt is made to shoot near the animals front legs to disturb the ground or water in front of it is that there have been cases of hitting the animal in the paw or leg, especially if it is running toward you, or ricocheting off the water and into the animal.

          Sadly, I still see this advised on the internet, as with this: "
          If a bear continues to approach your area and gets too close, it is time to use bear spray or fire a warning shot at the ground or water in front of the bear."
          http://www.alaskafishingak.com/alask...ear_attack.htm

          That is terrible advice imo to suggest to fire a shot into the water in front of an animal. Not only could it glance off the water at a shallow angle and hit that animal, but anything beyond that, including other anglers or other bears.

          Just want to stress these aspects when "warning shots" are discussed, as usually things happen in the heat of the moment and few I think consider what they may have been taught as far as hunting safety concerns.

          Mark Richards
          www.residenthuntersofalaska.org

          Comment


          • #6
            HaHa... I like that

            Conclusion? The only sure way to get a bear out of the area is in your back pack.[/QUOTE]

            Comment


            • #7
              Bushrat,
              Seriously real concern as I have learned from reading others experiences. I wonder if Joe Want is around to share a story I read once in a hunting book regarding a warning shot on a Brooks range bear. It shows the reality of bushrats point and would be cool to read it direct from him.

              Originally posted by bushrat View Post
              I will just offer up this for folks to consider.

              This spring I helped out with a hunter-ed class/course in Fbks. One of the things taught and heavily stressed is to know what's behind your target before shooting, and the dangers of shooting at skylined animals etc.

              Warning shots often pose this same danger when shooing past an animal, over its head etc. Another danger in a "warning" shot whereby attempt is made to shoot near the animals front legs to disturb the ground or water in front of it is that there have been cases of hitting the animal in the paw or leg, especially if it is running toward you, or ricocheting off the water and into the animal.

              Sadly, I still see this advised on the internet, as with this: "
              If a bear continues to approach your area and gets too close, it is time to use bear spray or fire a warning shot at the ground or water in front of the bear."
              http://www.alaskafishingak.com/alask...ear_attack.htm

              That is terrible advice imo to suggest to fire a shot into the water in front of an animal. Not only could it glance off the water at a shallow angle and hit that animal, but anything beyond that, including other anglers or other bears.

              Just want to stress these aspects when "warning shots" are discussed, as usually things happen in the heat of the moment and few I think consider what they may have been taught as far as hunting safety concerns.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just what is it that makes Bears attracted to you guys..........???????

                In all my years of hunting , fish camps, trapping and just 'living' among the three Bears 'found 'round here, I have yet to have a bad Bear encounter.....

                Wish I could vote....be I can speculate a bit.....

                I guess my "warning" would come in the same form of any 'sympathy' I have, and comes in the form of a brain scrambling shot to the head.....
                If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.:topjob:

                "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
                  Just what is it that makes Bears attracted to you guys..........???????
                  Won't speak for anyone else, but the two events I referenced were both directly associated with a bait station. I'd like to think the bears didn't want anything to do with me personally, but I wasn't particularly interested in proving myself wrong.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yaaaaa, I imagine a bait station would be a good reason to have a Bear encounter or three......I do nothing to activly encourage Bears to arrive, as someone plans when setting bait.

                    I do not do such, but you have a great reason
                    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.:topjob:

                    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The only time I've fired a warning shot was at a HUGE brown bear in my yard. I went outside to see what the dogs were barking at to find him in the back of my pickup. I yelled at him and he slowly crawled out of the truck. My 12ga was loaded with 00buck (for dogs) followed by slugs. I figured I'd hurry him along a little bit so I smoked that 00 into the ground beside him. He stopped, looked right at me, and my brain said "uh, oh", a split second later he walked off at a slow pace. Definately wasn't a DLP situation, but he sure wasn't impressed by the boom of my 12ga. I decided that day that warning shots aren't coming from me again.
                      Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        walkin my trap line last year (about 4 miles or so) I was charged by a moose, So i jumped off my trail to let it past and it ran over me, then turned around and charged me again, and I shot in the air with my 22 revolver and it left.
                        Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I was on Kodiak deer hunting in the alpine and a bear came out of the brush about 200 yards away. He was digging roots. After watching it for a while I stood up to leave and the bear saw me so I waved my arms and shouted at him. This was like calling a dog because he started running towards me. He was not acting aggressive just curious. When he got about 50 yards from me I fired a warning shot into the ground with .44 pistol. He immediately stopped and looked across the canyon where the echo came from. Then he resumed running towards me when he got to about 25 yards (with me still waving my arms and hollering at him) he stopped and looked me over real good then turned and ran down the hill. The warning shot sure did not scare him.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've done it once. I used to lead groups of 20-30 teenagers across Crow Pass every summer, and we had our fair share of bear encounters out there. Only twice did we have bears that were a bit too curious for comfort. Once we were well above treeline and were able to keep the bear out of camp by yelling, throwing rocks, etc. while always keeping a visual location on it. The other time we were camped down in the timber and the bear kept coming in at different locations, never moving too far away at our yelling and such. I put one round straight into the ground about 5' in front of where I was standing. The bear quickly changed directions and did not come back again. I can't say that the shot was the magic trick, but it seemed to work at that moment. If discharged straight into dirt, I can see the usefulness of trying a warning shot in certain situations.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by jnalaska View Post
                              Bushrat,
                              Seriously real concern as I have learned from reading others experiences. I wonder if Joe Want is around to share a story I read once in a hunting book regarding a warning shot on a Brooks range bear. It shows the reality of bushrats point and would be cool to read it direct from him.
                              Heard 2 stories about want 1 he was banned and 2 was no longer posting.
                              Kxj66

                              Comment

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