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  • Alaska Gray
    replied
    For those that use or seen a 3-d target. The instructors grade the shot if the shot would of taken a vital or not. The 3-d rings scores on the target do not mean anything when qualifing

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  • Longbow
    replied
    Originally posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Other people may do it in a different order and have other targets available. This is a "suggested" format for the course.

    1. Two shots, 19 yards kneeling, 18 yards standing. Deer
    2. Two shots, 21 yards kneeling, 26 yards standing. Elk or caribou
    3. Two shots, 20 yards kneeling, 26 yards standing. Deer
    4. Two shots, 14 yards kneeling, 11 yards standing. Black bear, elevated.

    Nothing over 30, there may be some bush in the way, could be quartering or broadside.

    Five out of eight arrows must be in the kill zone. At least one arrow in the kill zone per target.

    No time limit but I am not going to stand there at 10 degrees waiting for you for very long.

    KILL ZONE = I carry an arrow to check, I place it above the animal, inline with the shot. The vitals lines are for broadside shots. So a quartering away shot while missing the line, may actually hit the opposite lung or heart.
    Thiose distances are "ish" ... meaning I don't want to hear that "X-Target" is supposed to be exactly 27 yards ... some funny comments made out there. Also, 5 kills in 8 shots on four targets ... you have to kill one twice ... do it early. A lot of folks, who are good shots normally, feel the pressure as everyone is watching. Kill your first target twice ... then the pressure fades. Oh ya, you might see different 3-D animals then mentioned above, nothing smaller then your standard whitetail target. If you mess up, your are welcome to come back and re-shoot at the next gathering ... I have never, or ever seen someone turned away.

    And lastly ... all instructors are volunteers and they all want to see you pass the first time but if it comes down to it, and if you fail - the instructor didn't fail you ... you failed you (the instructor just marked the score).

    http://wildlife.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=he.bow_ed

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  • JMH
    replied
    thanks for the info.

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  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    Shots

    Other people may do it in a different order and have other targets available. This is a "suggested" format for the course.

    1. Two shots, 19 yards kneeling, 18 yards standing. Deer
    2. Two shots, 21 yards kneeling, 26 yards standing. Elk or caribou
    3. Two shots, 20 yards kneeling, 26 yards standing. Deer
    4. Two shots, 14 yards kneeling, 11 yards standing. Black bear, elevated.

    Nothing over 30, there may be some bush in the way, could be quartering or broadside.

    Five out of eight arrows must be in the kill zone. At least one arrow in the kill zone per target.

    No time limit but I am not going to stand there at 10 degrees waiting for you for very long.

    KILL ZONE = I carry an arrow to check, I place it above the animal, inline with the shot. The vitals lines are for broadside shots. So a quartering away shot while missing the line, may actually hit the opposite lung or heart.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 11-26-2006, 15:01. Reason: Additonal infor., cold fingers

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  • JMH
    replied
    what are the distances of the shoots? how many shots? is there a time limit per target?

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  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    Here

    Alaska is working on an online certifications course but it is not approved yet. This is basically the same thing as the archery cert. class in Alaska.

    http://www.bowhunter-ed.com/index.htm

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  • AlleninAlaska
    replied
    Thanks for the replies. Where can one find the the class curriculum online?

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  • Alaska Gray
    replied
    IF you qual with any bow then you can shoot any bow. Also if you have a range finder you can bring it to. But if you don't have one you can not ask a person with one how far the target is.

    It drives me nuts to see how many people go up there with out practicing and expecting to pass it.

    Leave a comment:


  • crossfoxAK
    replied
    bow certification

    I feel that the archery certification is a great requirement. If someone cannot pass the archery proficiency test they SHOULD NOT be allowed to hunt with a bow and arrow. I feel that any Tom, Dick, or Harry would buy a bow just to hunt the other seasons that Alaska provides. I think being an archer makes hunting not only more a challenge, but it brings out a true meaning of Hunting and not KILLING!! I take pride in shooting archery, and after doing it for awhile, I actually prefer it to rifle hunting. I would have to agree with Alaska Gray on the matter of practicing. Anyone can pull a string and release an arrow, but ethically when hunting you should be able to hit a vital. Not just wound an animal. Good luck

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  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    Yes

    There is nothing on your card or is it recorded anywhere, what you passed the course with.

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  • JMH
    replied
    a bow is a bow right? i mean, if you qualify on the recurve, you are good to go with the compounds?

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  • Alaska Gray
    replied
    Allot of people take it for granted and think it's easy to pass. Now if you practice it is, but I see allot of people come into the shop and ask for help cause they have the bow test in a day or two. I ask how long they have been practicing and they usally say last week or never. Better one I heard before can you help me pass my test this weekend. I need to pass so i can head up to the haul rd. ;ater in the week. This person never shot a bow before and no he did not go to the haul rd. He failed.

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  • Longbow
    replied
    There is also a workbook to complete before the classroom portion; not difficult but may take a few hours to complete. You'll get the "package" of material when you sign up for the class(es). Also, some don't pass the field portion on the first go around - I have seen folks 3 and 4 times before they cert.

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  • Alaska Gray
    replied
    It depends. Right now the pratical(shooting) part is closed for the winter and depending on the weather it could start in april. During the winter months you can take the class portion. In the spring you can do an all day class Class room portion then pratical part.
    One thing to keep in mind is in the spring these calsses fill up very quick. Give fish and game a call and ask for maggie lindsey she is in charge of the bowhunter section. If she has the 2007 schedule, she can give you the class dates and time. Or drop in and there should be a sign up book for the class in the hunting dept.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    One Day Usually

    Over here in Valdez we do an all day class with the shooting session in the afternoon, depending on daylight and weather. We start around 8 am. and go until all material is covered. We have had to postpone the shooting sometimes as most archers can not hit the target when it is 10 degrees and 30 mph winds.

    It should be about the same for most places. If you go to:
    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...type=bowhunter

    You will find a list of classes and times.

    Leave a comment:

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