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  • carbon arrow fletching

    My set-up: Hoyt Aspen 40" axle to axle, 67# draw at 29"... Easton XX75 GameGetter II in 2315 @ 30".

    I want to try some carbon arrows and not sure where to start. I have used aluminum for the past 10 years and know nothing of carbon. One of my favorite things to do is to "build" my own arrows. Is this still possible to do with carbon? I currently use a Grayling fletcher but am willing to buy a different model if need be. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    Jed there a few things to consider. First off your shooting heavy arrows which I personally think is a good thing. You will have to decide if you are going to stay with heavy arrows or go lighter with your carbons. I have experimented with carbons and I shoot the same arrows you do, 2315's. Most of the carbons are set up strictly for your draw weight and length of arrows when selecting what you want so that part is easy. There are so many arrows out there to choose from though in so many different diameters so its a little overwhelming. I shot some Carbon Express Terminator Hunters that were almost the same weight as my 2315's (12 gpi) and hit with almost an identical POI at all ranges. I use a Bitzenburger fletcher and had no problem fletching the CE Terminator Hunters but if you go with some of the really skinny carbons like the Easton Axis you might have a little trouble but I dont believe so. You also use different adhesive for carbons than aluminum but other than that you should be good to go. Personally I think your setup is a good one but I know what its like to want to try something new.

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    • #3
      I think...

      you'll be glad you decided to try carbon arrows. I was a die hard Easton alluminum shooter until a few years ago when I switched. Carbon arrows are much stronger and will not bend like alluminum arrows so you don't have to worry so much about the abuse they will take at the range, constantly pulling them out of targets and such. They also don't ocilate (sp?) in flight as alluminum arrows may do. This ocilation can acutally change the impact point of the arrow as it hits the target, thus changing the angle of the arrow as it enters. Carbon arrows are stronger so they don't do that.

      And I'm not trying to rag on Alluminum arrows at all, a lot of people still shoot them and they are fine, great for hunting and target shooting, I just believe that carbon arrows are a step up...that's all. Not trying to ruffle feathers at all.

      You will still be able to build your own arrows no problem. I personally use arrow wraps to brighten up my arrows instead of cresting them (painting). They work fine stuck to the carbon and I've never had a wrap come off. You can glue on fletching right on top of the wrap. Get with your local pro shop and they can show you in person how to properly put in inserts and such in carbon arrows. It's defintately cheaper if you can build them yourself for sure! Carbon arrows are more expensive but they will last a lot longer than alluminum arrows.

      I personally shoot Beaman ICS Hunter arrows, although I have heard good things about Gold Tip and I'm sure Easton makes good ones too. I think you will be very happy once you shoot some!

      At any rate....good luck and let us know how you like them! Oh'yea...always great to get a post from another HOYT shooter!!!

      Take care...

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      • #4
        Gold Tip!

        I personally like using Gold Tip 7595's. They have proven to be extremely durable for me. I like the xt hunters or pro hunters. They are expensive but last a long time. I like using an Arizona e-z fletch with a 6 degree right hand offset. I also like using the Easton Uni-knocks instead of the gold tip knocks. Just personal preference.

        Durability is the main reason I switched to carbon. They take a lot of abuse without bending/breaking.

        Todd

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        • #5
          You might check with Alaska Bowhunting Supply in Anchorage.
          http://www.alaskabowhunting.com/
          Their Grizzly sticks are a hard shaft to beat. They carry everything you need to build the arrows, & your jig will work fine.
          Vance in AK.

          Matthew 6:33
          "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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          • #6
            CE Terminiator Hunter Selects

            Second on the CE Terminator Hunter Selects. Nice arrows. The biggest problem I have found is adhesive. Eventually I decided it was more the preparation than the glue. After I strip the old fletching I slightly abrade the shaft with fine sand paper and clean with alcohol. I also so the same to the fletching. The abrading of the two increases the surface area for the glue to bond too. I have not had any problems since.

            I also used to have the Easton Axis. I wanted something heavier henceforth the switch.

            Patriot Life Member NRA
            Life Member Veterans of Foreign Wars
            Life Member Disabled American Veterans


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            • #7
              Originally posted by NE to AK View Post
              I personally like using Gold Tip 7595's. They have proven to be extremely durable for me. I like the xt hunters or pro hunters. They are expensive but last a long time. I like using an Arizona e-z fletch with a 6 degree right hand offset. I also like using the Easton Uni-knocks instead of the gold tip knocks. Just personal preference.

              Durability is the main reason I switched to carbon. They take a lot of abuse without bending/breaking.

              Todd
              Second this but I use a Blitzenberger fletcher. My duravanes ar 4'
              Living the Alaskan Dream
              Gary Keller
              Anchorage, AK

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