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Bowhunting Goat

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  • Bowhunting Goat

    I've read previous post on subjects regarding bowhunting goats, but wanted to get fresh experiences and suggestions. From what I've read goats tend to hold their ground a little more often than sheep (instead of running off) & your best bet is to get above them in hopes of a good clean shot. Any thoughts or tips to share?

    Anyone been successful?

    Thanks-

  • #2
    there was a great story on an archery goat hunt in one of the last traditional bowhunter mags... within the last three issues, i think.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    • #3
      Yeah, I think I read that one...great story. I've read a lot of stories, but most of them don't really talk about tips on hunting goats with a bow. I'm looking for tips that may increase my chances of being successful & I don't always get that out of the mags. However, I still like reading about their hunts & some of the info & strategy they use is helpful.

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      • #4
        tip:

        wait until they are somewhere you can put a good stalk on them before starting your stalk.

        Works for photographing sheep...
        I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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        • #5
          PS theres a pretty good article in this months tradtional archery on bowhunting goats.
          I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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          • #6
            Not an expert but I've been on three guided BC goat hunts in the last four years. On a couple of occasions my guides and I have used a white painters suit to get closer to goats. In both instances once the goats saw us they came in for a closer look. We were in some pretty remote spots so I doubt that these goats had ever seen a human before especially one in a white suit.

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            • #7
              they will seem to allow you within 400-500 yards easily usually. and if your destination seems to be to one side or the other they don't get alarmed. but will watch you. also they can not count....if you are spotted and there are two of you one can stay in plain sight and the other hunter can keep out of sight and get closer. above is where you want to be . the tend to lay down from 10-2 if you spot them before that you have 3-4 hrs to get into place.
              long fluffy hair makes them look larger and allows for poor arrow placement
              have proper gear.
              Goats are my favorite animal to hunt I have hunted them alot but have never gotten one with a bow. I have put two arrows thru the fluffy hair:mad:
              losing weight to try it again this fall.....at 60 it is really a tough hunt to consider. last year tried twice but had boat issues that ruined one hunt or restricted access on the other. working on that issue as well.
              RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
              MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

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              • #8
                either way

                The main difference I see between goat hunting and sheep hunting is. The goats look down at you from 2000 feet and say "look at that dumb###, I wonder what hes doing coming up here". A sheep looks at you from a mile away and says "I see a dumb***, Im outta here! Either way you gotta come in from the top if your gonna stick a arrow in them. Ill be humbled by one in 363 this fall .

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