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newbie jumping into bow hunting, first bow recommendations?

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  • newbie jumping into bow hunting, first bow recommendations?

    Greetings all, i am looking into starting bow hunting and would like educated view points on what is a good beginner/intermediate compound bow. I am aware that there is a bow hunting safety class that is mandatory before i can begin hunting in bow only areas and such and plan on developing my shooting technique this fall through the winter and participate in the ADFG class next spring. I live in Wasilla/Palmer area and have a medium/fair budget based off what i see across the bow cost spectrum.

    Thanks in advance.

    2001 20' Alumaweld Intruder

  • #2
    If you want to hunt with a bow, don't buy a cheap beginner model. Also buy one you can crank the poundage up as you get used to it. I have mine set at 80 pounds. I'm still shooting aluminum shafts with old school Satellite 4 blade razor insert broadheads. I usually get pass through shots on moose. I have taken 19 moose with a bow.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
      If you want to hunt with a bow, don't buy a cheap beginner model. Also buy one you can crank the poundage up as you get used to it. I have mine set at 80 pounds. I'm still shooting aluminum shafts with old school Satellite 4 blade razor insert broadheads. I usually get pass through shots on moose. I have taken 19 moose with a bow.
      appreciate the insight, is +- $600 for a bow considered cheap? i was trying to leave room for purchasing a target, arrows, tips, etc
      2001 20' Alumaweld Intruder

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      • #4
        600 should be a decent bow. You can make your own target with a canvas bag filled with shrink wrap. I have one hanging from a 2x4 frame in the back yard. Mine is white and I painted several bullseyes on it. You should have a back stop behind it. You will likely have some wide misses at first. Start shooting from rather close until you get the hang of it. Learn good form. If you don't have good form and proper follow through, you'll not ever get your full potential for accuracy. I practice from 40 yards for most of my back yard shooting. I like to be within 20 yards for the 1st shot at a moose though, but I have taken longer first shots depending on the situation. Once I have a hit it's game on and I'm shooting every chance I get until it's down.
        Arrows and gear are expensive, but you really only need 3 or 4 practice arrows. Save the others for hunting. Shoot a few for a group, go pull them, and do it again.
        Don't just take the advice of some dweeb behind the counter either when it comes to gear, broadheads, etc. Talk with fellow hunters. Of course you'll be taking the bow hunter education course also.
        One of the biggest factors for bow hunters is knowing how to track and blood trail. It's best to spend some time with someone who has plenty of experience with that. I have had several buddies that have been with me on a blood trail that were surprised to see me get down on my hands and knees to blood trail. I take it slow and flag the trail as I go. I tracked one bull that was hit with a non fatal wound for 14 hours and covered more than a mile. Finished him off just before dark.
        Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

        Comment

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