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  • #16
    It's the same on the rivers - access is always a problem and everyone wants to go the same places. I upgraded to a boat to 'get away' from people and ended up finding a new group of people to try and avoid. I don't do well with planes so I'm either going to start hauling my wheeler in my boat or I'm seriously going to consider forgetting the fact I hate the noise and look into buying an air-boat.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by AlaskanOutdoorsman View Post
      I'm seriously going to consider forgetting the fact I hate the noise and look into buying an air-boat.
      Or you could find a guy with an airboat and go with him. I would not mention you hate airboats. One other thing, I have an airboat and its no guarantee you will get a animal you still need to know where to hunt.

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      • #18
        Point well taken Mr. Moose; I should have stated 'don't care for'. (My SportJon is loud I suppose so I shouldn't much complain). That said, I agree that outdoor toys don't guarantee success - I just love getting away from people and enjoying Alaska for what it is. The boat helps, but I'm still seeing more people than I want which is frustrating. Ah well.. sooner or later I'll find someone with an air-boat and get some first hand knowledge; until then, it's me and my SportJon.
        "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

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        • #19
          so I have my trusty Gazatteer to help.
          Don't trust your Gazatteer anymore. It's a good tool, but it really tells you absolutely zero about land use in all areas of Alaska. Want to know who owns what? Go to the Mat-Su Borough website and look around at their maps. Once you become proficient with that it can become a very useful tool. You can find the owner of just about every parcel in the borough.
          Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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          • #20
            Originally posted by AKDoug View Post
            Don't trust your Gazatteer anymore. It's a good tool, but it really tells you absolutely zero about land use in all areas of Alaska. Want to know who owns what? Go to the Mat-Su Borough website and look around at their maps. Once you become proficient with that it can become a very useful tool. You can find the owner of just about every parcel in the borough.
            No doubt about the gazatteer statement. Practically useless. I would also be skeptical of BLM maps. They are NOT reliable if more than a year or so old.
            "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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            • #21
              I do not belive if someone is lost and stumbles onto someones property that it is criminal trespassing. I do agree that the maps available are lacking in accurancy. Your best resource for land info is sometimes that property owners in the area. If they don't seem to friendly then it might be best to find another area. Good luck
              Ignorance is not Bliss, it's insanity

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pike_palace View Post
                No doubt about the gazatteer statement. Practically useless. I would also be skeptical of BLM maps. They are NOT reliable if more than a year or so old.
                The Gazeteer (the Alaska Atlas) was never intended to be the definitive tool for determining land ownership. But it is an essential hunt-planning tool because it shows general topography and waterways. So you use it to examine general locations and such. All the air charters use it for this purpose too, so you need one when you're working out details with your air service. But if you've been using the Atlas for determining land ownership, you're using the wrong tool for the job.

                The BLM has printed maps that also show general land ownership status, but they show the entire state or large blocks of it. They are color-coded with the general boundaries of state, federal, private and native-held lands. But they are intended to show only generalities. For specific boundaries of private land in smaller locations you have to go to the BLM public lands information office or look online. They have maps intended for this specific purpose.

                I disagree with the comment that the best source of private land boundaries is the landowners themselves. But not because they're going to claim land that's not there. It's because it's not really practical in most cases. To engage a landowner in a discussion about boundaries of their land suggests that you're already in the field and perhaps trespassing on their property. Figure it out ahead of time and make sure you know where you are. Then of course if you encounter a land owner in the field it's always a good idea to talk with them and let them know that you're trying your best to remain on public land. They usually respect that.

                -Mike
                Michael Strahan
                Site Owner
                Alaska Hunt Consultant
                1 (406) 662-1791

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by squab View Post
                  Lack of access to state land is the problem. To many folks/agencies trying to shut others out of their spot is the problem. To many folks/agencies trying to limit means of access, is the problem. It was not that long ago access was easy, the infrastructure that made the access to the current developments has come to a halt state wide. The trails we blazed as young men, now have houses on them, with out the addition of new trails for the access people desire.

                  A simple look at new zoning plans in the boroughs, show that ease of access is only getting more difficult.

                  Too many Humans is the problem, and it is only going to get worse at an accelerating rate. The other part of the problem is too many humans live in cities, then at the same time they all want to catch a fish, or they all want to bait a bear. There is NO "Access to wilderness" problems for those who walk/hike. The people crying for more access are the ones with machines.

                  I am in the wilderness nearly every day, and I know by tracking the human footprints where people stop. If people want there own private wilderness experience, all they have to do is avoid trails, and go for a walk/hike.
                  ALASKA is a "HARD COUNTRY for OLDMEN". (But if you live it wide'ass open, it is a delightful place to finally just sit-back and savor those memories while sipping Tequila).

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                    Public access out that way is VERY limited. Unfortunately sport hunters (mostly ATV folks) disregard the signs and go in there anyway and it leads to problems. A close family member of mine lives out there and someone even shot their dog. So they are understandably reluctant to welcome outsiders.

                    And no, they don't post signs on public land. Sheesh.

                    You're better off finding some public land. Go to the Public Lands Information Office. They have the maps and can fill you in on what's what.

                    Mike
                    Thanks for the info Mike. I've never been in that area and saw where the road ended on the Gazatteer and wanted to check it out. Just to clarify, there was no arguements or anything. I was on a public road and happended to see a guy out by his mailbox, so I stopped to chat. The guy was now overly-friendly, but not rude. AK is a big state, if they don't want people there, I will move on. No reason to stir up a hornet's nest.
                    "What is it about a beautiful sunny afternoon, with the birds singing and the wind rustling through the leaves, that makes you want to get drunk? --Jack Handy

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
                      Too many Humans is the problem, and it is only going to get worse at an accelerating rate. The other part of the problem is too many humans live in cities, then at the same time they all want to catch a fish, or they all want to bait a bear. There is NO "Access to wilderness" problems for those who walk/hike. The people crying for more access are the ones with machines.

                      I am in the wilderness nearly every day, and I know by tracking the human footprints where people stop. If people want there own private wilderness experience, all they have to do is avoid trails, and go for a walk/hike.
                      The problem with walk-in access is the walk-out if you are successful. I have been trying to find good walk in areas but the thought of dragging the game out is a definite downer. Sheep, deer, and goats would be the only thing I would consider as walk-in animal up here. Also to walk in means to sacrifice a lot of comfort.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
                        Too many Humans is the problem, and it is only going to get worse at an accelerating rate. The other part of the problem is too many humans live in cities, then at the same time they all want to catch a fish, or they all want to bait a bear. There is NO "Access to wilderness" problems for those who walk/hike. The people crying for more access are the ones with machines.

                        I am in the wilderness nearly every day, and I know by tracking the human footprints where people stop. If people want there own private wilderness experience, all they have to do is avoid trails, and go for a walk/hike.
                        On that i may agree to some extent, though over the last few decades Alaska population has not grown exponentially as people imagine.

                        What has changed is the amount of private land owner ship. Throughout the 80's and 90's the state sold off parcels, made home stead areas, and encouraged people to expand. A trip along the Parks or Glenn highways these days, show how many people that have homes in Anchorage, Mat-Su and other places, now also have remote cabins on 5-10 acre of land. Many have more then one. Combine that with the Native land allotments, the Mental health allotments, the university of Alaska allotments all throughout the last 25 years, and private land ownership along our travel corridors has gotten tight.

                        Today the Federal Government still maintains control of nearly 89% of Alaska Lands, the final transfer of state lands was supposed to happen by 2012. However the funds for that transfer of title was cut in the $12.00 congress managed to remove from the budget. Transfer of title to the state lands, is now projected to approximately 2021 or later.

                        Currently the State has over 200 letters to the Federal government contesting the quite title act, and access issues. The current administrations policy is that public lands are held in trust for the public, however should a member of the same public wish to use those lands, that use is considered personal use.

                        Personal use is subject to permits and fees, all of which will be suspended during the Federal survey and designation of wild lands.

                        through out the early and middle parts of the 1900's here in Alaska, exploration was a daily factor of life, trails, roads and other were cut and mapped. until the late 1970's and early 1980's when the Environmental attitude of save the last frontier from its self took a strangle hold on our state. Law suits, budgetary constraints and other, have hamstrung the infrastructure that helped develop the early stages of Alaska's settlement.

                        In short, we now live in a bottle necks society with nowhere else to turn with out turning on our selfs, and that my friend has become the grand plan of it all.
                        squab (probably of Scandinavian descent; skvabb, meaning "loose, fat flesh") is a young domestic pigeon or its meat

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