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  • Shrimp size?

    At the below listed website the charter company show prawns of a large size being cooked on a grill (you have to scroll down a bit to see the picture). Any take on what types they are and do they always cook them in their shells? Thanks, for I didn't think AK produced such large sized shrimp.

    http://www.saltwaterexcursions.com/photos/?nggpage=2

  • #2
    I would say those are spots. Lot's of ways to cook 'em, but BBQ is one of the best. I peel mine before I put them on the grill.

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    • #3
      I have found that leaving them in the shell is easier on my fingers as it makes everyone peel their own. I have also found that folks who peel their own eat a lot less than those who have them peeled for them!
      Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
      Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

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      • #4
        They look like spot shrimp, and yes they are typically pretty large. As to why they'd be cooked in the shells, it's difficult to remove the shell from a fresh raw spot shrimp, much easier to peel them after they've cooked.

        I've marinated them in lemon juice and garlic and grilled them up on the beach in a cast iron skillet. Between my wife kids and myself we can polish off a gallon bag of tails fairly easily. Few things better than fresh spots on the beach.
        Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

        If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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        • #5
          I have found that if you freeze them for an hour first, peeling is much easier. By found, I mean the search function on here after the first go round with peeling them.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Floridascuba View Post
            I have found that if you freeze them for an hour first, peeling is much easier. By found, I mean the search function on here after the first go round with peeling them.
            That works well or you can blanch them for a few seconds. I use a pair of kitchen sheers and cut them down the back. They peel much easier after the cut.
            sigpicSpending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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            • #7
              You can't guess how many people that I have cooked shrimp for that, while eating them, ask me why I didn't peel the little fellas for them.

              Beggars can't be choosy - after all - I spent HOW much per pound and how much labor to get them - and these ungrateful dirty lil bastages want me to peel them for them also....NOT gonna happen.

              I like to eat the legs too. They are crunchie.

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              • #8
                I don't have any problems peeling shrimp, raw or cooked??? I get about 25 to 30 in a sandwich bag when processed. It takes less than 5 or 6 minutes to peel them all, raw or cooked. I just peel the first two sections of tail-shell (fat end), then just squeeze the bottom tail end and the meat comes right out.

                You really should try eating the whole shrimp, just lift off the top of the body,then carefully get the little black gut bag (about the size of a small used pencil eraser) and vein out of the middle of the body, and eat the rest. It's very good!!! If it's your first time, you might want to have a cocktail or couple of beers first to get your courage up, but trust me, they're very good, especially fresh on the beach or boat, grilled or steamed. My Son always saves the big jumbos and throws them on the barbeque whole, then we and the kids eat the whole shrimp. yummm!!!

                Here's another way to cook them that I've tried this winter. Peel them raw, grind them up in your meat grinder, grind once course then re-grind fine, add a little baking soda and your favorite cracker meal or bread crumbs then make fritters and fry. yummmmm!!!

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                • #9
                  I love the whole head on shrimp that is tempura fried at japanese restaurants.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sockeye Salm View Post
                    I don't have any problems peeling shrimp, raw or cooked??? I get about 25 to 30 in a sandwich bag when processed. It takes less than 5 or 6 minutes to peel them all, raw or cooked. I just peel the first two sections of tail-shell (fat end), then just squeeze the bottom tail end and the meat comes right out.

                    You really should try eating the whole shrimp, just lift off the top of the body,then carefully get the little black gut bag (about the size of a small used pencil eraser) and vein out of the middle of the body, and eat the rest. It's very good!!! If it's your first time, you might want to have a cocktail or couple of beers first to get your courage up, but trust me, they're very good, especially fresh on the beach or boat, grilled or steamed. My Son always saves the big jumbos and throws them on the barbeque whole, then we and the kids eat the whole shrimp. yummm!!!

                    Here's another way to cook them that I've tried this winter. Peel them raw, grind them up in your meat grinder, grind once course then re-grind fine, add a little baking soda and your favorite cracker meal or bread crumbs then make fritters and fry. yummmmm!!!
                    I've been wondering about this issue and watching every video available/read many threads and this is the first I've heared someone address removing the black vein. Back east I used a de-vainer [curved plastic probe ~ 8" long]. I swear I've seen most folk pop the shell on the prawns and eat them without removing the vein.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AKluvr95 View Post
                      I've been wondering about this issue and watching every video available/read many threads and this is the first I've heared someone address removing the black vein. Back east I used a de-vainer [curved plastic probe ~ 8" long]. I swear I've seen most folk pop the shell on the prawns and eat them without removing the vein.
                      Eat them like that al the time. Often wondered about it though. Lots of years eating shrimp and I'm still here. (Cough..Cough).
                      Seems I remember seeing a tool and B&J's for deveining shrimp.

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                      • #12
                        In my post above, I only meant getting the gut bag out of the body. If I'm just doing tails I just pull the head off and don't worry about the vein, it's unnoticeable. My preferred way to just cook tails is steaming them in a vegetable steamer for about a minute and a half or there abouts. keeps them nice and juicy, and retains the sweetness.

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                        • #13
                          When I peel the shell of shrimp that I've thawed, I first remove the shell and then pinch the end of the tail to remove the meat from that part. What I've noticed is that unless you pull the meat from the pinched tail part really fast, the vein will pull out out the body along with the pinched part. And if it doesn't, then that doesn't stop me from eating them anyway!

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                          • #14
                            I leave my shrimp in the running live well for 20 - 30 minutes. they tend to clean themselves out. Or they seem to as they are clean when I pop the heads off and very rarely see anything in the vein. And the water tends to get dirty pretty fast.
                            2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
                            5.0 Mercruiser Alpha 1

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                            • #15
                              Just remember that the "vein" is not a vein, it's the, well for lack of a better term, the shrimps poop tube.
                              Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                              If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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