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Side Stripe Shrimp

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  • Side Stripe Shrimp

    So I know everyone targets the spot prawns out of whittier. But if my recollection serves me correctly, the side stripe shrimp is a bit closer to the Amaebi (sweet shrimp) found in higher end sushi places.

    Are there decent populations in the whittier area? I figure its like asking where I can catch pink salmon during the king salmon season so I thought I'd ask.

    I've read they are more mud bottom types then Spot shrimp which are more structure and rocks kinda environment.

    If I HAVE to settle for spot shrimp, then so be it. lol.

  • #2
    There has been a commercial sidestripe fishery out of Whittier for quite some time now, but all the fishing is done by dragging, not pots. I'm not sure if this is because the sidestripes aren't attracted to bait or because of the depth they're found at, but it's all dragging to my knowledge. The fishing is concentrated in Port Wells and Perry Passage, and yes, that is primarily a muddy bottom.

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    • #3
      Only a few of the shrimp I catch are side stripe. Mostly spot. I don't particularly care for the taste of spot shrimp so I usually just throw them back. Just kidding.

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      • #4
        You are right Brian, they are vegitarian. But you will catch a few in pots now and then. Some places do allow PU shrimp trawling.

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        • #5
          The side stripes and there's quite a few of them out there, are in the mud. I think your mistaken on the side being sushi grade shrimp. I will trade you my sides for your spots. LOL I throw my sides back. They taste like mud to me. Not chicken

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          • #6
            Interesting stuff. Vegetarian? Thanks. I have bought sidestripe at the store and they were great raw. But I can see if they live on the mud bottoms how they could "acquire" the taste.

            I was thinking if you could find them shallower since I want to try some shrimping from a kayak this year or just untargeted, it might have some decent results. Okay, sounds like there is a reason for targeting the spots. No harm in sticking to the spot shrimp!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mallardman View Post
              You are right Brian, they are vegitarian.
              I thought that was the case, but I wasn't certain...didn't want to pass along inaccurate information.

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              • #8
                For those that say you toss them back and that they have a muddy taste, are you sure you're not referring to either coonstripe or pink (humpback) shrimp? I can't recall ever catching a sidestripe shrimp in a pot in PWS. I'm sure it happens, but it would be rare at best. I do catch coonstripe and pink shrimp with regularity, though. As for coonstripes, I think they're sweeter than the spots.

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                • #9
                  Your right Brian I assumed he meant coons. I call them stripes. They may be sweeter there also mushier and muddy tasting to me. IMO I as do most prefer the spots for the best table fair.

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                  • #10
                    Here's a link with a photo of all the shrimp you are talking about.

                    http://www.monkeyfacenews.typepad.com/

                    Its a big page but just scroll down about a third of the way and you'll see the photo with 5 species of shrimp. Pretty cool for figuring out what you're catching. I've mostly caught spots and only a few coons.
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      tastey little buggers those sidestripes... What about pink shrimp?
                      I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Trakn View Post
                        Your right Brian I assumed he meant coons. I call them stripes. They may be sweeter there also mushier and muddy tasting to me. IMO I as do most prefer the spots for the best table fair.
                        I agree that spots are king of shrimp when cooked. The others it seems like most are good but enough are soft and mushy it turns me when boiled or steamed.

                        I am talking about eating the shrimp raw. The spots are also excellent, texture very firm for raw shrimp but to me, it seems like they aren't as sweet. But I can't say I have ever tried them side by side.

                        I was interested in the other species because if they were under harvested like say pink salmon by sports fishermen, maybe they would be easier. Plus I was looking to fish something shallower since I want to do it out of a kayak and I also hear that you have a higher chance of catching an octopus in shallower pots...say 300 ft or so. As long as eventually I got enough shrimp, for eating preference I'd prefer to see an Octopus come up in a pot. A large part due to the fact I can buy shrimp but it seems rare to be able to come up with good quality Octopus for human consumption around here and its never fresh (not frozen) or raw.

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                        • #13
                          Kardinal84
                          When you catch that 80 pound Octopus and your in your kayak, call me... I want to watch that show play out.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Trakn View Post
                            Kardinal84
                            When you catch that 80 pound Octopus and your in your kayak, call me... I want to watch that show play out.
                            Ya you bet! I will need the help. I should have a video rolling so I will post it. haha. I've wondered what would happen. I plan to carry a burlap bag specifically for the purpose. The goal for kayak fishing this year is to catch one of those either in a pot or any other method out of a kayak.

                            I've wondered what i would do if i ever hooked into something too big fishing alone like a 100 pound halibut which is completely within the realm of possibility if not rare. As I day dream, jubilation of towing in a big fish like that quickly gets wiped out by a salmon shark or sea lion slamming it and me being in the water with them. Or maybe the halibut just wakes up. Either way, tied off to a 9ft Kayak probably ends up in a very bad outcome for me. Reality is I will probably freak, squeal like a little girl, and either cut the line or drop the rod before it ever gets to that point. I'd love to catch one, but I don't need to die trying to eat one...there's always Sagaya's.

                            lol...hijacking my own thread...

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                            • #15
                              In this town if you go to a sushi bar and they serve you raw shrimp it will be side stripe, and if you’re lucky they will serve up tempera shrimp heads. Usually the tempera shrimp heads are free because a lot of folks will not eat them. First time I had them it was a bit of a challenge, now just bring it on. Grab the pointy snout and dip in some sauce and chomp em down.
                              The problem with spot shrimp is they are not commercially available except for a short time in the spring, and this will be the second commercial year for spot in many years. I also think side stripes are more stable with the heads on for prolonged periods because that is how the sushi restaurants receive them, could be wrong on this.
                              Jay
                              07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
                              OurPlayground.

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