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  • washington state first trip to alaska this summer

    Hi everyone its me again sorry to keep bothering you all but your info is so very much valuable..As you know my partner and i are coming to the Alaska fishery for the first time this summer. We have a thursday to tuesday fishing window in a motor home. originally we were planning a june trip but we have decided b4 we go to get sum advice. June july or august what would be our best chance at hitting the most fish..Kings are always fun but what about the silvers? It doesnt bother us to have to walk to get to the fish and away from the people........any help would be so much appreciated thank you very much....washington state

  • #2
    Any of the above.

    Your timing most definitely depends on the experience you are looking to enjoy. My forte is on the Kenai Peninsula, so others can pipe in on other areas.

    June, good king fishing on the Kenai and Kasilof. Early June you can find kings in the lower peninsula streams as well (check the regulations for the openings). The halibut fishing in the inlet is going really good as well. The early sockeye runs are weak but fishable. The Russian River opens on the 11th but doesn't peak until around/after the 20th. The lake fishery is great... normally the ice goes out in late April early May, so the water temps are still low enough to keep the fish within reach. June is not nearly as crowded as July, so campgrounds and lodging should be available.

    July, Great salmon fishing! Kings peak on the Kenai and Kasilof around the 15th as do the sockeye (as do the people!). The last two weeks of July would likely be the most productive if you are looking to fill the freezer. Likewise the halibut fishing is going great. The silvers are available out of Seward, but will likely require a charter to get to them. We also catch a few silvers at the end of July on the Kenai, depending on the commercial fishery openings. The lake fishing is a bit tougher because the fish normally go deep and become virtually unreachable. As mentioned in other threads, however Crescent Lake opens for grayling on July 1 and the fishing is usually very good (high mountain lake).

    August, most king salmon fishing seasons are closed. Still some sockeye available on the Kenai (up thorugh the 10th) with great fishing on the Russian. Silver fishing picks up around the 10th adn peaks around the 15th on the Kenai and Kasilof (depends on commercial openings). You might also find some great pink fishing at Resurrection Creek, Bird Creek and other spots, however pinks return to the Kenai (and other areas) on even numbered years. The crowds will have dispersed.

    So, when to plan your trip.... simply think about the experience you are looking for. Check out the book store on this site and pick up a couple of books.... basically anything by Gunnar Pedersen, but particularly The Highway Angler. This guide book will help you to find some great out of the way (or in the way) places to fish.

    Good luck in your planning.

    Cheers

    Comment


    • #3
      pinks

      however pinks return to the Kenai (and other areas) on even numbered years.
      Would this apply to all of Alaska? Like the Southeast also? I have never salmon fished and am currently planning a trip. Would I expect to catch none or very few pinks this year? Sorry about the basic question, just trying to figure it out. Thanks.:confused:

      Comment


      • #4
        Good question!

        Originally posted by louisiana View Post
        Would this apply to all of Alaska? Like the Southeast also? I have never salmon fished and am currently planning a trip. Would I expect to catch none or very few pinks this year? Sorry about the basic question, just trying to figure it out. Thanks.:confused:
        I have not fished in Southeast, so I don't know the answer to your question. I know that there are areas in Prince William Sound that get pinks every year (as well as Cook Inlet as noted in my previous post).

        While it is certainly entertaining to play with the pinks, if you get them either in the salt or fresh in the river, they are very good to eat. There are also techniques to avoid pinks if you are targeting silvers... for example, fish the faster water or soak eggs without an attractor. You will still catch pinks, but not as many as if you were to use spinners or plugs. So, bottom line, keep your options open, and if pinks are in the area, all is not lost...

        Cheers

        Comment


        • #5
          Fish Processing

          Make sure that you do not take your fish for processing to any commercial processor that sells to the publics.

          YOU WILL be left with scraps as they take the slabs and sell them commercially and give you the small fillets left from the floor.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by louisiana View Post
            Would this apply to all of Alaska? Like the Southeast also? I have never salmon fished and am currently planning a trip. Would I expect to catch none or very few pinks this year? Sorry about the basic question, just trying to figure it out. Thanks.:confused:
            There's plenty of pinks in Southeast all years, the difference is like on a pink year 160 million will get caught whereas an off year only 130 million will get caught... I think odd years are big years in SE anyway
            I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ilikesalmon View Post
              Make sure that you do not take your fish for processing to any commercial processor that sells to the publics.

              YOU WILL be left with scraps as they take the slabs and sell them commercially and give you the small fillets left from the floor.
              I don't agree with this statement at all. Do you have any evidence to back it up? The sale of sport caught fish is illegal in Alaska, and it's an offense that's taken very seriously...

              I've worked both the commercial and sport side of most Alaskan fisheries, and I have seen 2 occasions (first-hand) of sport caught fish being sold commercially... one was a charter guide who got busted selling clients' fish, and the other was a restaurant that was serving sport caught halibut.

              All of the processors I've worked with in SE go to great lengths to keep sport and commercial fish separate, and all do a superb job processing your catch and turning it into the best possible product for their clients.

              -Case
              M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by countywarrior View Post
                Hi everyone its me again sorry to keep bothering you all but your info is so very much valuable..As you know my partner and i are coming to the Alaska fishery for the first time this summer. We have a thursday to tuesday fishing window in a motor home. originally we were planning a june trip but we have decided b4 we go to get sum advice. June july or august what would be our best chance at hitting the most fish..Kings are always fun but what about the silvers? It doesnt bother us to have to walk to get to the fish and away from the people........any help would be so much appreciated thank you very much....washington state
                August is my favorite month to fish silvers and bottom fish in SE. Once lings are re-opened, the fun just never stops between salmon (silvers, keta and even a few feeder kings), rock fish, halibut and sablefish, there's always something to fish for, even on bad weather days.

                My one "concern" is that you mention walking to where the fish are... for the best variety you'll want to consider a boat-based option: either a bare boat rental, skiff, or charter. I quit fishing the road system here many years ago, as there's just not nearly as much available if you don't have good access to the salt.

                Happy Alaska Travels!
                -Case
                M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
                sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ilikesalmon View Post
                  Make sure that you do not take your fish for processing to any commercial processor that sells to the publics.

                  YOU WILL be left with scraps as they take the slabs and sell them commercially and give you the small fillets left from the floor.
                  You have spoken your mind on several ocasions. Time to give this one a rest

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ilikesalmon View Post
                    Make sure that you do not take your fish for processing to any commercial processor that sells to the publics.

                    YOU WILL be left with scraps as they take the slabs and sell them commercially and give you the small fillets left from the floor.
                    Originally posted by kgpcr View Post
                    You have spoken your mind on several ocasions. Time to give this one a rest
                    My point exactly! Without any facts or evidence presented, This sort of comment reeks of "bashing" a competing business. Or perhaps ilikesalmon had a bad experience with ONE processor... but to make generalized statements about ALL processors is just plain bad form. The fact that I've worked with numerous processors who DO NOT do what he/she alleges is proof positive that the statement is false.

                    I just hope anyone reading is intelligent enough to know the difference between real advice and uneducated babble!

                    Happy Alaska Travels!
                    -Case
                    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Proof

                      Yes, we took pictures of our catch and filed the complaints with the BBB.

                      It is well documented. There are several other people who sent me emails who got robbed the same way.

                      DO NOT take your catch to a commerical shop that sells to the public. You will lose any decent fillets you get. You WILL get left with the scraps.

                      I'll be back every year to tell my story so fishermen who come from miles and spend thousands do not get robbed. The will be informed.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Processor bashing...

                        BBB isn't a law enforcement agency. What bothers me about your posts is their general nature that implicates all processors in the state. I've had FAR more processing experience than you and I've had some very good jobs done.

                        If you have a complaint against a SPECIFIC processor, great. I'm sure we would all like to know who to avoid. If you have tangible (and legally admissible) evidence of sport caught fish being sold, I'm sure the Alaska State Troopers would be happy to investigate.

                        To say all processors violate the law is would be like me saying that all commercial fishermen are thieves and all non-Alaska residents are murderers and liars... Obviously not true statements.

                        -Case
                        M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Who to stay away from

                          I'd like to post their name but it seems they have quite a bit of control over the content of these boards.

                          Sponsorship has it's privileges. No name bashing allowed.

                          No, over the research I've done and the people who've responsed to me it seems concentrated on two very large operations who also have a large commerical shops.

                          Yes, I've talked to the AK Troopers as well. They've heard the same complaints.

                          Who know, hopefully they will be doing some kind of sting this year.

                          Ha, my guess is the commercial fishermen would love to do their own investigative reporting.

                          Listen, we called the processor and gave them the out saying they mixed our fish with someone elses. The response was nasty and sharp. We got cussed out.

                          When we compared the fish weights with what was turned in we were sure we were shorted.

                          Then we wound up with many more tail fillets than haili we caught. We caught some white kings and in the fish given to us there were none.

                          I've heard the smaller mom and pop shops are great and honest. Just stay away or you come home "BLUE".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sponsorship has changed

                            Man, just goes to show if you don't pay attention.

                            I see Big Blue no longer sponsors this forum.

                            There you have it. Outed.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Big Blew Steals Fish

                              I can attest for the fact that Big Blew steals the fish it processes for sports fisherman. I received 3X as many tail sections as halibut caught. Explain that. Further, my team landed 2 40+ kings, and 8 in the 12-22 pound range. Filets being filets, some must be thicker. Having fished for 40 years, I found all of the filets came from fish in the 10-20 pound range. Where did the 40s go? Finally, Big Blew blew the order ... the first 2 days were all ordered smoked, the final day fresh filets. Big blew chopped all fish and froze it. Might as well have turned it into fertilizer.

                              Word of advice - do not use Big Blew to process your fish. There are several alternatives. Skippers use them as they get a kickback from big blew. The outfits guarantee you bring your catch home, and they do it right. Big blew is a big fraud.

                              For the record, salmon fishing at Sitka is the best I've ever seen. There are just some shady characters ruining the experience for the rest of the legit operators.


                              Originally posted by CanCanCase View Post
                              I don't agree with this statement at all. Do you have any evidence to back it up? The sale of sport caught fish is illegal in Alaska, and it's an offense that's taken very seriously...

                              I've worked both the commercial and sport side of most Alaskan fisheries, and I have seen 2 occasions (first-hand) of sport caught fish being sold commercially... one was a charter guide who got busted selling clients' fish, and the other was a restaurant that was serving sport caught halibut.

                              All of the processors I've worked with in SE go to great lengths to keep sport and commercial fish separate, and all do a superb job processing your catch and turning it into the best possible product for their clients.

                              -Case

                              Comment

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