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  • Russian River Flies

    I was just on the Cabelas web site and noticed they now carry some Russian River flies................HMMMMMM.
    They come pre-rigged on a 34" 30# mono leader and come 3 to a pack.
    Plus they are on sale. The chartreuse ones are 3 for $1.99, which doesn't seem too bad.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...174&hasJS=true
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    www.arcticangler.ca
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy_7mPiqoqw&t=11s

  • #2
    And on Gamakatsu hooks, too....

    I found a few of these locally last year near the end of the season, and while I didn't use them for the Russian, I did use them for coho in an area where they were fished in a pretty similar fashion. The only difference was the coho would actually follow them and bite...didn't necessarily have to line them in the mouth. I had one scare the crap out of me...hit as I was pulling it in to flip it back up stream, only about two feet from my knees.

    I hope they improved the materials a bit, though, as one fish would pretty much tear the material off (rather then bucktail, they were made with some plastic stuff that just didn't hold up in a fight).

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    • #3
      Those fly's made out of synthetic material tend to float too. I have seen people have a hard time getting them "down" to where the fish are. Thats why I use only the real stuff.:eek:
      Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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      • #4
        30lb leaders for cohos:confused:
        For use in silty water only?

        Wow those flies would take about 30 seconds to tie! I can't believe how sparse it is. Does anyone know the advantage of the tube used near the eyelet? It looks like there's a small tube that the line feeds through and is knotted to the hook eyelet, I don't understand the purpose of doing that versus just tying that material and leader/line right onto the hook. Thanks for any insight.

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        • #5
          so those are tube flies (material is on the tube not the hook), anybody know if tube flies are legal in fly fishing only waters?

          Those might be decent trolling setups, or put a couple spin and glos on em and you got a nice drifting rig, not so sure about sockeye fishing with em
          I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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          • #6
            Not a big Fan

            Not that I wish to bash any store trying to get by in the world by paying retail plus shipping is a tad excessive for fly gear. Sportsmans I do believe is selling them 3 for .99 without the leaders or at least that is what I saw last year however not on quality hooks but hey they are Russian River Flies which in most cases in this state end up in the back of reds on some stream. Sorry for the reality posting!

            That being said 30 LBS leaders is WAY OVERKILL unless your doing the Pig and Jig and not wishing to play with your food.

            Average Joe after a little practice can turn out about 2 DZ an hour of those bad puppies figure 13 bucks 100 Mustads, 4 bucks x 2 for a coupleof bucktails most places if you already own a vise, bobbin and thread 21 bucks will get you a hundred Russian River / Coho flies or about .5 cents each and that is pruchasig material at retail at a place like Sportsmans. Commercial tiers can produce 3-4 DZ and hour honest. Being that a lot of larger stores that offer commercial tied flys purchase from overseas the over all cost with labor is not that far off becuase they purchase in bulk i.e. 10,000 dz hooks of one size which brings the price down and covers third world country labor cost. I think last year when I was contacted they were charge $2.50 per dz which included shipping. That of course did not inlcude the leader :-)

            I suppose it is a mute point if you do not tie your own. :-(

            Sorry for rambling Again! It is Friday the 13th. Hope I did not step on anyones thoughts was not my intent.

            Final note $1.00 per fly or $12.00 is a little on the high scale for Coho Flies IMO.

            Tight Lines and Best Wishes.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
              so those are tube flies (material is on the tube not the hook), anybody know if tube flies are legal in fly fishing only waters?

              Those might be decent trolling setups, or put a couple spin and glos on em and you got a nice drifting rig, not so sure about sockeye fishing with em
              They don't looks like actual "tube flies" that I've seen or read about, but heck I sure don't know? heheheh. I recently got a ton of fly tying stuff and included were some tube flies and tube fly attempts, the ones I got look more like these:

              http://www.flyfisherman.com/ftb/bctubeflies/index.html

              Maybe there's just different style of tubes. From that article, I can understand why tubes present new and different options, but looking at those flies on the cabela's site, I don't see that they add anything. I have tubes, hooks, and ideas, but that's as far as I've gotten with it.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by FishnPhil View Post
                They don't looks like actual "tube flies" that I've seen or read about, but heck I sure don't know?
                Yea these aren't very "traditonal" tube flies you do see a lot of "flies" tied like that for saltwater trolling they are used like hoochies and I'm sure work very good. Anyway they are marketed as tube flies.
                I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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                • #9
                  Those Russian River flies are probably for the Russian River in California.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                    so those are tube flies (material is on the tube not the hook), anybody know if tube flies are legal in fly fishing only waters?
                    why wouldnt they be legal in fly fishing only waters? look like a fly to me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was talking to the Gamakatsu guys at last years sportsman's show about these flies. They are made for the Alaskan version of the Russian River. That is the whole intent, anyway.

                      But, yeah...I wasn't impressed when fishing with them. Too sparse, as someone mentioned, and they did float, so leader length became even more important. Plus, like I said, one fish would pretty much tear the "fly" up, leaving you with less then what you started with, which isn't much to begin with.

                      I like the fact that they are on Gama's and that they put an effort into producing what is essentially a one-river product for us, though. Now we just need to convince them to use real bucktail and we're in business. They probably would be good for trolling behind a flasher, though.

                      I used to tie my own coho flies, and yes, it's easy and all that....but I also have less time and more kids now, so I tend to not tie anything and buy for simplification. Is it over-priced? Yes, but so is just about anything related to fishing. It's called "profit." How much do you think it actually costs to make a high-end fly rod? I do believe they make a killing....

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by akriverrat View Post
                        why wouldnt they be legal in fly fishing only waters? look like a fly to me.
                        because they are not tied on a hook they are tied on a tube which is threaded on a line before the hook is tied on.
                        I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just a thought.... we are talking sockeye flossing here aren't we?

                          What difference does it make if virtually all the material shreds away after one stinkin' fish? If you're flippin' N rippin', the almost-bare hook will probably work better anyway.

                          BTW, the best thing you can do to a typically way over-dressed commercially-tied bucktail "Russian River" streamer is to whip out your scissors and trim away about 90% of the buoyant hollow hair affixed to that hook. Much less likely to rip one in the back. Take that one to the bank.
                          "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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                          The KeenEye MD

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fishNphysician View Post
                            Just a thought.... we are talking sockeye flossing here aren't we?

                            What difference does it make if virtually all the material shreds away after one stinkin' fish? If you're flippin' N rippin', the almost-bare hook will probably work better anyway.

                            BTW, the best thing you can do to a typically way over-dressed commercially-tied bucktail "Russian River" streamer is to whip out your scissors and trim away about 90% of the buoyant hollow hair affixed to that hook. Much less likely to rip one in the back. Take that one to the bank.
                            I agree with fNp - sparse is the way to go. Not only does bucktail make the fly more buoyant (since it's hollow) but a bunch of bucktail also causes more drag/friction in the water, which further decreases how quickly the fly sinks.
                            Pursue happiness with diligence.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fishNphysician View Post
                              Just a thought.... we are talking sockeye flossing here aren't we?

                              What difference does it make if virtually all the material shreds away after one stinkin' fish? If you're flippin' N rippin', the almost-bare hook will probably work better anyway.

                              BTW, the best thing you can do to a typically way over-dressed commercially-tied bucktail "Russian River" streamer is to whip out your scissors and trim away about 90% of the buoyant hollow hair affixed to that hook. Much less likely to rip one in the back. Take that one to the bank.
                              I was just giving my impressions. Like I said, I was fishing them for coho, and they do like something to chase, so sparseness became a problem. However, if all you intend to do is rip n flip at the Russian, by all means go as bare as possible. I realize that's the intent of these flies, but they can be used in other applications like any coho fly, and they just don't hold up well.

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