If Redoubt Blows it's top...

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  • HainesAKFisherman
    replied
    I won the office pool.

    How many people here were betting on when it would blow> and how many people were growing tired of the geologists reports thinking it was never going to happen... One guy in my office pool chose January 2020 as his date.

    Leave a comment:


  • DRIFTER_016
    replied
    Originally posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    Yep, she popped her cork last night.
    Who had 10:30PM March 21st in the pool?? ?? ??

    OOPS, I meant March 22nd.

    Leave a comment:


  • DRIFTER_016
    replied
    Yep, she popped her cork last night.
    Who had 10:30PM March 21st in the pool?? ?? ??

    Leave a comment:


  • garnede
    replied
    I guess it is no longer if.

    Leave a comment:


  • JOAT
    replied
    However, volcanic ash isn't "dirt"... it would be similar to taking very finely powdered sand blasting abrasive compound and running that through your motor. All the unfiltered 2-strokes and similar small engines can be quickly destroyed by ash. Summer is a terrible time for an eruption and the ash will not only fall, but will continue to be blown around by every breeze and all the vehicle traffic for weeks to months afterward.

    Leave a comment:


  • profishguide
    replied
    Engines breathe too.

    I would be more worried about my outboard, as they do not have air filters, get caught in ashfall and destroy an engine. I've been told it only takes 8 oz of dirt to wear out an engine (over its life, however long or short).

    Leave a comment:


  • JOAT
    replied
    Originally posted by skydiver View Post
    http://www.avo.alaska.edu/

    Link to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

    I would not be the least surprised if it just kind of fizzled out.

    For now.
    Doubtful... it can rumble for months before it blows. I wouldn't stop keeping a close eye on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ak_powder_monkey
    replied
    Originally posted by garnede View Post
    So tell us how that ash effected the fishery there. I would be interested to see what other people think it would do to our fishery if Redoubt droped a foot plus of ash on us.
    Kodiak has done ok since 1914 I believe there was 5 feet of ash from novarupta

    Leave a comment:


  • skydiver
    replied
    http://www.avo.alaska.edu/

    Link to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

    I would not be the least surprised if it just kind of fizzled out.

    For now.

    Leave a comment:


  • markopolo50
    replied
    Redoubt?

    Any news on Redoubt? I haven't heard anything lately and wondering how it is perculating now? Thanks, Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • skydiver
    replied
    Originally posted by Cohoangler View Post
    You seem to be assuming that if Mt Redoubt erupts that it will be similar to what happened in 1989/1990. However, what happens if it erupts and dumps 2 feet of ash over all of SC Alaska, including the Kenai Penninsula and all of Anchorage?

    Just outside of Portland, Oregon (my location) there are layers of rock where the volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens is over 2 feet thick. Those layers are not that old....

    My point is that volcanos don't play by a set of rules. All of the volcanos around Cook Inlet (and Oregon) are capable of producing enough volcanic ash to crush every house in Anchorage (or Portland), if the wind is blowing the right/wrong direction. They've done it in the recent past and they could again. Volcanos are dangerous and unpredictable. I'm not an alarmist, but I would not underestimate what could happen.
    Mt. St. Helens is a totally different situation than Redoubt. I would just listen to what the USGS says and not worry too much about it. Pick up one or two air filters for the truck, washer fluid, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • upinak
    replied
    Originally posted by Cohoangler View Post
    You seem to be assuming that if Mt Redoubt erupts that it will be similar to what happened in 1989/1990. However, what happens if it erupts and dumps 2 feet of ash over all of SC Alaska, including the Kenai Penninsula and all of Anchorage?

    Just outside of Portland, Oregon (my location) there are layers of rock where the volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens is over 2 feet thick. Those layers are not that old....

    My point is that volcanos don't play by a set of rules. All of the volcanos around Cook Inlet (and Oregon) are capable of producing enough volcanic ash to crush every house in Anchorage (or Portland), if the wind is blowing the right/wrong direction. They've done it in the recent past and they could again. Volcanos are dangerous and unpredictable. I'm not an alarmist, but I would not underestimate what could happen.
    I lived in Wyoming as a small child when Helen's blew. Wyoming got some of the dusting too... then I moved to Alaska within that same month. Interesting how lifes changes yet stays the same in some ways.

    The difference is the placement and disposition of the magma as well as the rock chemistry surrounding it. Ask a geologist in your area.

    Also Ash is a natural and very powerful fertilizer. Besides making the grass greener, your garden thrive. It also can fertiloze the waters (rivers, lakes, streams, etc) and the banks making things thrive like you wouldn't believe. The year after redoubt blew in 89-90 up here the fish were great (trout, salmon, etc) a little dusty from the ash blowing around, but not bad. Then again... would you rather have ash in the air or wild fire smoke?

    Leave a comment:


  • garnede
    replied
    Originally posted by Cohoangler View Post
    You seem to be assuming that if Mt Redoubt erupts that it will be similar to what happened in 1989/1990. However, what happens if it erupts and dumps 2 feet of ash over all of SC Alaska, including the Kenai Penninsula and all of Anchorage?

    Just outside of Portland, Oregon (my location) there are layers of rock where the volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens is over 2 feet thick. Those layers are not that old....

    My point is that volcanos don't play by a set of rules. All of the volcanos around Cook Inlet (and Oregon) are capable of producing enough volcanic ash to crush every house in Anchorage (or Portland), if the wind is blowing the right/wrong direction. They've done it in the recent past and they could again. Volcanos are dangerous and unpredictable. I'm not an alarmist, but I would not underestimate what could happen.
    So tell us how that ash effected the fishery there. I would be interested to see what other people think it would do to our fishery if Redoubt droped a foot plus of ash on us.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cohoangler
    replied
    Volcanos have no rules......

    You seem to be assuming that if Mt Redoubt erupts that it will be similar to what happened in 1989/1990. However, what happens if it erupts and dumps 2 feet of ash over all of SC Alaska, including the Kenai Penninsula and all of Anchorage?

    Just outside of Portland, Oregon (my location) there are layers of rock where the volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens is over 2 feet thick. Those layers are not that old....

    My point is that volcanos don't play by a set of rules. All of the volcanos around Cook Inlet (and Oregon) are capable of producing enough volcanic ash to crush every house in Anchorage (or Portland), if the wind is blowing the right/wrong direction. They've done it in the recent past and they could again. Volcanos are dangerous and unpredictable. I'm not an alarmist, but I would not underestimate what could happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • alaskachuck
    replied
    Originally posted by dirtface View Post
    Really??? You can remember that long ago?

    Remember what???????:confused:

    Leave a comment:

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