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Best way to store 600' of leaded line?

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  • alaskabliss
    replied
    Headach

    I have personally thrown my coils instead of running the line out to test if it would lay right, after watching deadliest catches of coarse, and every pot was tangled. I always run my line out and I always take the time to coil my line even if im going to reset. I don't have the time to have a pot not working properly. I run 600' on all 5 pots and use a "baby puller"( Ace line hauler) to retrieve my treasures.

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  • potbuilder
    replied
    Originally posted by akfishnut View Post
    Potbuilder - I always thought it would be kinda interesting to test your theory on sunkin pots. If a person could get a couple boats together and drop a very heavly weighted line down - say 200 feet off each boat - and then run a line between the two, you could kind of dredge by trolling for sunken pots in the middle - that's if they still had the floats attached and were just submerged out of site and drifted off. ????
    I'd go at least 1200' between boats, and if you do catch a ball of pots do you think those pullers you have will have the balls to pull it up.
    My grapple i used lobsterin' was a 50lb lead pig with 10' of HEAVY CHAIN in front of it and the chain had hooks welded on it to snag the gear. If i remember correctly i used aprox. 4 times the depth of the water to get this to tend the botton.

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  • jrogers
    replied
    Dreding for sunken pots

    If someone wants to give this a try some time just let me know. I bought a grappling hook a few year back after I lost three pots on one string. I drug it around several times, since I has a GPS point when I dropped them, but with no luck. I put several hours into this with 20' of heavy chain on the grappling hook. You would think it would wrap around the line from the pots to the sunken buoy pretty easily, but I had no luck.

    Jim

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  • akfishnut
    replied
    Test Your Theory On Sunking Pots

    Potbuilder - I always thought it would be kinda interesting to test your theory on sunkin pots. If a person could get a couple boats together and drop a very heavly weighted line down - say 200 feet off each boat - and then run a line between the two, you could kind of dredge by trolling for sunken pots in the middle - that's if they still had the floats attached and were just submerged out of site and drifted off. ????

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  • potbuilder
    replied
    Originally posted by Doug from Anchorage View Post
    Steve, How far apart do you space your pots? Will an Ace line hauler pick 5 donaldson baskets on one shot of line?

    Your advice is appreciated

    Doug
    I'm going 100' apart right now, any closer and if you try and use a buoy at each end they may have a tendency to marry up and tangle on tide switches. I don't know much about those baby pullers but whenever i go by somebody pulling pots with one they sure seem SLOOOW pulling. You've got to remember that even spaced 100' apart you'll have all 5 pots hanging straight up & down before you get the first one up to the boat(in most conditions) so it will be a lot of strain on those little gears(pot metal??) in those pullers not even thinking of how hot the motors will get. Maybe somebody else will chime in and prove me wrong on the toy pullers. I'll have a hauler(puller) at the shows that you might be interested in if you don't have a puller already. They anin't gonna be cheap but you'll only buy it once.

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  • Doug from Anchorage
    replied
    Spacing Pots

    Steve, How far apart do you space your pots? Will an Ace line hauler pick 5 donaldson baskets on one shot of line?

    Your advice is appreciated

    Doug

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  • potbuilder
    replied
    Originally posted by ak4195 View Post
    If your setting pots somewhere where theres decent current,running out the gear can cause more drag through the water,hence more driftage.
    Run with what works for you and is simplest/safest too,just tried to explain things from my commercial experience.I dont think I would have the patience or writing skills to adequatly do the subject justice.
    As far as running out the gear vs throwing,Ive thrown miles and miles of bouyline over the years(in my past life).For single potting one or 2 sport pots its probably a moot point,but if say you wanted to longline 3 or 4 pots over a cliff for spots then what?

    ak
    If your going to set in a spot with a good current running you gotta get uptide and lob'em in there lots of weight in the pots helps sink'em fast and on target, the rope don't matter. What you have to remember is that even a well weighted pot will take aprox 4-5 minutes to get to the bottom in 100 fathoms, with a good tide running they sail quite a bit. Thats why i believe 85% of the "stolen" pots just float away, most folks don't have enough buoy line and/or enough weight in them & they sail/drift right into the deep, sink the buoy or just float away like a bobber and worm floating in a lake for sunfish..
    I do fish all 5 pots on one line and have buoys w/900' buoy line at each end, once i run out my buoy line i cleat it off and drag the buoy till i get to the spot i want to set on then just run out the pots and the other buoy line done. All i fish are "steep & deep" locations and i hit my target area most of the time.
    25 years of fishing lobster back east taught me a lot about setting & hauling gear & i can do it FAST. If i didn't gillnet all summer i'd be rigging a boat for shrimping in the sound when they open it to commercial fishing.
    If your at any of the shows this spring stop by and say hello.
    Steve
    Last edited by potbuilder; 01-22-2009, 23:35. Reason: bad spelling

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  • ak4195
    replied
    Originally posted by potbuilder View Post
    "Less gear driftage,which can mean way less bouyline needed in the first place.":confused:
    Please 'splain this to me or am i missing something?? Why do you need less buoyline?? The depth your gonna fish is the depth your gonna fish no matter how you set the gear and you still need 25-30% more buoyline than the depth of the water.

    "Then theres the topic of "running out the gear" vs throwing it out,you can set a pot and throw out 100 fathoms of well coiled bouyline in maybe 5-10 seconds,tub or no tub vs running it out"

    I'm :confused: again? So the extra minute it takes to run out 100fathoms of bouyline and knowing that its set right vs. a throw it out in a coil and hope that a ******** in the rope doesn't snag up the whole mess, sink the buoy and /or float your pot/pots away(somebody stole my gear :eek makes sense ? Me i'll take the extra few minutes to set my gear running out the lines. (but what do i know:rolleyes
    If your setting pots somewhere where theres decent current,running out the gear can cause more drag through the water,hence more driftage.
    Run with what works for you and is simplest/safest too,just tried to explain things from my commercial experience.I dont think I would have the patience or writing skills to adequatly do the subject justice.
    As far as running out the gear vs throwing,Ive thrown miles and miles of bouyline over the years(in my past life).For single potting one or 2 sport pots its probably a moot point,but if say you wanted to longline 3 or 4 pots over a cliff for spots then what?

    ak

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  • Vek
    replied
    I have a tremendous aversion to coiling those long lengths of rope. For checking pots during the day with intent to reset, just flake the rope loose onto the deck. Pots go back in the drink the reverse order they came out (last goes in first, first goes in last).

    For rope storage between sets, it depends on the pot in use. For the round net stacking pots or other pots with large doors and high internal capacity, I flake the rope by hand loose into the pot and close the bottom. When the time comes to deploy the pot, just pull or dump the flaked wad of rope onto your deck (be smart about it - rope to go out first should be at the top of the heap) and fire away.

    For rope storage using pots like Potbuilder's, you'll have to use some sort of separate storage means as suggested here.

    This year, I'll be running three of the stacking pots each with its own rope and buoys, and two of Potbuilder's pots each with a 100' shot of rope to piggyback onto two of the stacking pots.

    In general, I have looped ends on my ropes. One end gets shackled (wire the shackle closed) to a pot, the other end shackled/wired to a short buoy rope. This allows maximum versatility.

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  • Doug from Anchorage
    replied
    Garden Reel is the Most Compact

    My brother n law gets 3 shots of 600' on one reel. It takes two people though. I've attached a picture of it.

    Doug
    Attached Files

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  • Paul H
    replied
    Costco had 2 packs of plastic tubs for holding sodas, somehting like $15 for two of them. They are perfect for coiling shrimp lines, large dia and low sides. Also good that they come in a 2 pack, as I didn't tie mine down when we anchored up in a blow while the pots were soaking, and I lost one of them.

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  • Larsenvega
    replied
    Originally posted by jrogers View Post
    Larsenvega, are you saying that you pull your pots from an inflatable with a 600' line by hand (no davit), and coil the line on a spool?

    Jim
    No, not on the spool. That would be quite the feat though, and would certainly solve my storage problem! As it stands right now, all cordage on my boats (anchor and pot lines) get hand pulled and coiled onto the deck as neatly as possible. I've never had them tangle on the way back out, but it isn't easy to walk around the piles of rope laying around. Plus, on the zodi, deck space is very limited. When you add a cooler, tackle box, net, rods, 6 gal fuel tank and battery, there is just enough space to comfortably fish by myself or with one other person. Here's a pic of what I'm working with!
    Attached Files

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  • Boater
    replied
    Line

    I use an Ace Line Hauler and the line pretty much coils itself on the deck as it comes off. Then, I just pick up the coiled line and drop it inside the collapsible pot (I have 600' on each pot). That way, the pots and line are all together and sit in a corner of the deck.

    When I had the rigid square pots and was pulling by hand, I put each pile of line on top of its pot and used two bungee cords across the top to hold the line in place. This worked well enough that I could even turn the pots up on their sides for more convenient storage in the back of the boat. Never had a problem with the line getting tangled.

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  • hoose35
    replied
    I have a 22' glasply, not much deck space. I haven't shrimped a whole lot, but what I have done is just pull the rope in and pile on the deck. Then later when I got time, I coil it into a 5 gal bucket. The only reason I use the 5 gal bucket though is because anything bigger would really clutter up my deck.

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  • jrogers
    replied
    The baskets that MRFISH has a link to are sold at Donalson's or at least they were last year. I looked at these, but then went with small (5 gallon?) trach cans from AHI with holes in the bottom. They have the really tough gray ones (I forget the brand) that should last forever. I coiled for a while onto spools, but then I figured out that I don;t have enough friends, nor good enough friends to sustain this. Dumping into a bucket works well, and as long as you feed it back out and don't dump the bucket, it never tangles.

    Larsenvega, are you saying that you pull your pots from an inflatable with a 600' line by hand (no davit), and coil the line on a spool?

    Jim

    Leave a comment:

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