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  • Shrimping

    After reading sound fisher posts and pics I'd like to know if shrimping is still a popular sport for the average fisherman in Alaska? Or is it mostly commercially done? What is the status of the shrimp population in Alaska compared to say 5 years ago? More/less shrimp? And do shrimp reproduce quickly so as to restock their masses or are they slow to recover from depletion? It sounds like pods of 30 pounds or more are a common occurrence in Alaska. Is that correct? Or is that a lucky day in the eyes of you fisherman?

  • #2
    Hmm.... I have only dreamed of the day I pulled up even 15 lbs. I am relatively new to shrimping but its not that easy to find them.

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    • #3
      I would say it's very popular for the sport fisherman. And to find them...I don't think it's that hard, you've got to go deep and cold, preferably with a glacier nearby. I'm averaging 200-300 shrimp a drop with 4 pots now, I would say thats pretty good, but not 30 pounds!

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      • #4
        30#s of shrimp

        I am the person who posted I got 30#s of shrimp.I did not get tham all in a single pull. That was a whole day of shrimping. I usually pull every 3-5 hours, and sometimes much longer depending on how the fish are biting. It took me many tries to finally find a decent hole. Great pulls are not always the norm. When I started it seemed that I was lucky if I came home to show the wife my gallon ziplock filled with tails. Then I had to split it with my fishing partner. Often it just didn't seem worth it. Many people say that its "easy","there everywhere",but I was not that lucky or good. Persistance finally paid off, and now I do know a few good spots.Many miles and gallons of gas later. Ive always been a hard learner !!!!!!!!?????? How long do you other guys soak for?

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        • #5
          The area biologist in Cordova recommends setting your pots so that you fish a complete tide. Spreading your scent trail the furthest. Fishing thru a tide change messes up your scent trail.

          I always plan to pull and reset pots at the tide change every six hours or so. If I am in a particularly hot spot I pull every 4 hours and do well. More work, but better total catch for the day.

          I have been using the commercial shrimp pellets with good results. On the last trip I started adding a herring to each trap also, back to my old ways. They were stripping them to the bone. (sea lice were helping with that)
          John
          www.alaskaadventurejournal.com

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