Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

halibut jigging rod suggestions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • halibut jigging rod suggestions

    I'm looking for a halibut jigging rod to buy. Last time I went halibut fishing was with Capt. Brian out of Homer and he had a sweeeeeeet Calstar rod, but I was unable to solicit the model number from him in email. I'm sure he's very busy now. Do any of you have some good suggestions for limber, yet worthy rods for jigging halibut? If you have a good Calstar suggestion, that would be even better.
    "Wine can of their wits the wise beguile, Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile." - Homer, Odyssey

  • #2
    Whopper Stopper rods, they're extremely short and lightweight. I can fish with them all day long, they've caught 4 100+ pound fish on them. The guy that makes them is at the sportsmans show every year. I bought one from him then the next year bought 5 more, its all I use now.


    Comment


    • #3
      Loomis Bacara

      I have a Loomis Bacara 6'6" rod that is an excellent jigging rod. Great for butts and lings as well as rockfish. You can jig up to a 24 oz jig without problems. Loomis also makes a Muskie Stick that is about the same. I also have several friends that are guides that use the same rod. I am using a Shimano Calcutta 700 reel with 50# Power Pro line that works very well with the rod. Buy a good quality reel as well and you will have a great outfit.

      Comment


      • #4
        rod

        6'6" G.Loomis Bucara w/ a Avet sx reel w/65 tuff line xp is the sweet set up for jigging. Light, very durable. Never broke one and hae caught hundreds of halibut on them. Hereis a photo of a salmon shark we hooked up on a jig by mistake this year.
        Attached Files
        www.graylightalaska.com
        http://www.saltwatersportsman.com/ga...arter-captains
        (800)566-3912

        Comment


        • #5
          I like the 5'0 lamiglass rod. It has done real well for jigging this year.
          Living the Alaskan Dream
          Gary Keller
          Anchorage, AK

          Comment


          • #6
            Short and stiff, whichever brand. You want the jig to move with a minimum of effort in order to have more control, especially as depth and jig weight increase. Tuff/Spyder type lines really help because they virtually do not stretch. For light line jigging we use "muskie" style rods or jig rods from Florida. For heavier lines and jigs we use very light "California standup" styles. You won't find any single brand that gets it right for all line weights. Better to handle them each yourself before making up your mind.
            "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
            Merle Haggard

            Comment


            • #7
              Personally I think for jigging, less is more. Ie, meat sticks are great for dropping canon balls, but not the best for jigging. I like a rod that is more along the lines of a king salmon rod, and at most 50# spectra line. There are darn few cases where you will break 50# line, and having a lighter rod and thinner line allows you to use lighter jigs, all of which allow you to jig all day w/o wearing yourself out. For reals, I think Shimano's Torium with the 6:1 retrieve is about perfect, you can reel up and switch jigs in a jiffy.
              Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

              If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

              Comment


              • #8
                My personal criteria ...

                Since I am going to be moving the rod up and down and up and down and .... (well, you get the picture) I opted for the lightest (weight) rod I could find that will still handle big fish. With this in mind, I picked up 2 Ande Standup rods and matched them with Quantum Cabo 80 PT reels (I think). I also threw on 100# test PowerPro (or Spiderwire, I can't remember). I think the rods are 5'6" or 6' in length. The whole setup is about half the weight of my Lamiglas/Penn 114H 'bait' poles AND I know they can handle big fish because we have pulled up some nice 150#+ fish.

                In reference to the Whopper Stoppers, I also picked one up with the idea of using it specifically for jigging, but after catching more than a few on it, I prefer the extra length the Andes give. I just never felt comfortable fighting/reeling in a good fish on my whopper stopper. Now mind you, it wasn't because I was afraid they would break (those things are TUFF), it was the position of the reel and the lack of leverage available.

                Although I have a couple of different Loomis salmon rods, I have not used the Bacura. However, if you can afford one, I am 100% positive that you won't be disappointed. With my salmon rods, I sure havn't been.

                Additionally, I will second Paul H's comments on using extra-heavy duty salmon rods as good jigging rods. However, the heaviest jigs I have been able to use on these rods were the 5 1/4 ounce wilson darts. The sensitivity is amazing, (but if you are fishing in deeper water, you will need to use the heavier jigs thus requiring a stouter rod). However, IMO, with the salmon rod setup, you lose so much of the sensitivity if you are jigging at any depth over 120-140 feet. Add to the fact that if there is much (or even a little) current, you are going to have to keep giving line and 'walking' the jig in order to keep it on the bottom. If the current is moving .. .. well lets just say you may as well be trolling for sails, because you just can't keep it down where it needs to be.

                Jigging can't be beat if you are willing to put in the time and the effort to keep at it.

                -- Gambler

                Comment


                • #9
                  I agree with you Gambler, the whopper stopper needs to have a bigger butt on the rod. And the length does become an issue when you have to go around the twin outboards, but normaly it isnt a problem. Ive only gotten one line stuck in the props.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Iagree with the other post. To me one of the most important thing is the butt stock. I like a long enough one that I can dig into. Yes light weight is nice. Another is the line. This will make the difference. I use power pro #80. no stretch and it's small diam. help out allot.
                    Living the Alaskan Dream
                    Gary Keller
                    Anchorage, AK

                    Comment

                    Footer Adsense

                    Collapse
                    Working...
                    X