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Boat landing net recommendations

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  • Boat landing net recommendations

    Outfitting an old boat with waist high rail and seems like we may need something with a bit of reach. What brand, length, and hoop/net bag size do you find most useful? Anything to stay away from? One piece or telescopic (are telescopic strong enough?)? Thanks for the tips!

  • #2
    A couple of comments on the rubber nets you may be considering. They have their place, mainly the charter boats mooching silvers with a single hook seems to be their favorite so they can net and dump fish out quickly since their main feature is the hooks don't snag in the net But, I troll with 2 hook herring rigs and that second hook will catch on a web when you try to dump it out on the deck and break it so that feature is not as much help. And they are heavy and you can't scoop through the water as easily as a nylon net so unless you're experienced netting with them, you might consider nylon instead. Much easier to handle IMO.

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    • #3
      Thanks, that is super helpful information. I was able to go into B and J yesterday and almost bought a net but was specifically wondering about rubberized net bag.

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      • #4
        Some more details would help us get you dialed in. The best net for you depends on how much room you have in your cockpit, how good your net and rod men are, what you are targeting, and your style of fishing. If you have the room, and a crew of knuckleheads, bigger is better: go with an 8' handle and 3.5' - 4' hoop like the party boats use. I am in a similar situation to you as far as the boat goes; I usually fish out of a boat with waist high rail and a 2' swim platform. We are constrained by a hardtop over the cockpit, supports in the transom corners, and a cockpit depth of 6'. We tried a 6' handle once; it was great for netting fish, but everything else was a nightmare. There just wasn't enough room for it. We have settled on a 5' handle and a 30" teardrop hoop. Whatever you end up with make sure the bag is at least 3' deep; having a 50# flop out of the net because the bag was too small is a 'one that got away" memory you do not want to have.

        Big_E

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        • #5
          Big_E, Thank you for the excellent information. We have an old GlasPly 235. I would say our deck is pretty small, hardtop, with swim platform, two downriggers. However, I likely won't have any canvas up or supports, so the back deck should be pretty clear. I will likely have a mix of good rod men and some novices. I will be fishing kings when I can and silvers in July/ August.

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          • #6
            Nice Alaska boat! It sounds like you have the crew and the room for a 6' handle, and a ~3' hoop. The net should be at least 3' deep, and more is better for that possible encounter with an 80# king. Having a crew with a mix of skills is almost as good as having a bunch of pros. A good net man will coach the rookies. Two rookies is often a disaster. I let it happen once in a while on a small fish to show people how easily things can go south in a hurry, and for a little bit of amusement.

            Big_E

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