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Do red's bite?

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  • Do red's bite?

    Marcus and I are have a disagreement about reds. I say the bite, he says they dont. What do you guys think? Any flysfishers out there?

    How about catch and release? Read the thread by CapP (I think)about pinks.

  • #2
    Reds Definately Bite Sometimes....

    Just finished a float trip in Southwest Alaska - caught all 5 species of pacific salmon :-) Mostly Kings, Chum, and Reds. The majority of reds were caught on flys & it's hard to say if they chose to bite or not, but also had non-fly fishermen/women tossing spinners and witnessed a number of reds chasing and biting Mepps! Most of the time when the reds chased and hit the spinners, there were very few fish just temporarily resting or actually moving upriver. A few times though, pods of reds at rest would have an anxious fish or two go on the chase and bite.

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    • #3
      Well I don't know if they bite or not but I do know that when using fly fishing tackle 90% of the reds I hook are in the mouth. I have heard some say they do and some say they don't so it's all conjecture.

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      • #4
        Not what I said. . .

        Originally posted by SockeyOrange
        Marcus and I are have a disagreement about reds. I say the bite, he says they dont. What do you guys think? Any flysfishers out there?

        How about catch and release? Read the thread by CapP (I think)about pinks.
        SockeyOrange: I did NOT say reds don't bite. What I did say is that the method commonly and currently used to catch them is "flossing." To set the record straight, I know reds will bite at times, but I believe the great majority of them are caught by being flossed. Please don't misrepresent me. Thanks. . .

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        • #5
          I have had plenty of occasions where, when I have been fishin bows on the russian and many other streams where I have seen reds bite my flesh pattern. Matter of fact I watched one do just that this year...but I would say they are not very big biters...its more out of aggression I think...but who really knows except the fish.
          sigpic
          "I Envy Him And Him Only, That Catches More Fish Than I Do" Izaac Walton 1653
          The question of hunting is not a matter of life or death... it's more important than that

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          • #6
            Yup they do...

            I fish the Russian pretty hard...have also fished southwest Ak... Slap on a shrimp pattern (yes in freshwater) and let the fun begin....They'll tackle that fly time after time.....also had a good amount off success with different streamers.....
            “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
            "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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            • #7
              I had 2 people tell me, one a biologist and one an experienced guide, that ALL salmon on their way to spawn bite out of aggression rather than the need to eat. It doesn't matter what color, what type or what time you put it in front of them...if it doesn't piss em off, they wont take it.

              Please tell me what is right if what I "was told" is incorrect.

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              • #8
                here is my take which is not worth much

                Salmon have a very small and I suspect simple brain. Therefore, when a stimuli turns on a portion of the brain they react. So if something causes the feeding response they will do it out of reaction not because they are needing or wanting food and if aggression to defend territory is the stimuli they will respond to that. Therefore, they bite. However, Marcus is correct, Flossing for reds is a great way to catch them in the mainstem Kenai and they do not have to react at all – just swim upstream

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                • #9
                  I was wondering when we would hear from you on this. I was wondering what your degree is in? Mine is in math, so I guess we think somewhat a like if yours is in biology? Do you read journals to keep current or do you work in the field at this time?

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                  • #10
                    one way to tell

                    Originally posted by KirovPDR
                    I had 2 people tell me, one a biologist and one an experienced guide, that ALL salmon on their way to spawn bite out of aggression rather than the need to eat. It doesn't matter what color, what type or what time you put it in front of them...if it doesn't piss em off, they wont take it.

                    Please tell me what is right if what I "was told" is incorrect.
                    I too belive that they only bite a fly out of aggression or protecting there spawning ground, wich is not that often. One way i can tell is when I land my fish , the hook ( 99%of the time) is set on the outside of the mouth. I dont think i have ever had one swallow the hook like fish do when they are trying to eat something. Next time you catch one take a look at where your hook is set , i bet it will be hooked on the outside of the jaw.

                    good luck,
                    AKpredator
                    sigpicLOVE MY LITTLE SKULL CLEANERS

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                    • #11
                      Reds bite!

                      OK I'll chime in on this one. I agree with Marcus' assessment that the majority of reds are caught by "flossing". I believe that this is particularly true when the density of reds is very high. Nevertheless, last year, in August, while fishing silvers, I had a red practically swallow a vibrex and even had 2 seperate reds take the "glow and goo" (that is the eggs and spin-n-glow).

                      It is very clear biologically that the salmon do not digest when they enter fresh water. The aggression theory is very sound in regards to the vibrex, however I'm not so sure about the eggs. I suppose that it is possible that the fish are relying on the feeding instinct triggered by the scent or the attractor.

                      Bottom line: Reds bite, but not always; some are victims of circumstance.

                      BTW, 2 reds on Kwikfish earlier this year.

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                      • #12
                        Reds are the least aggrissive fish out of all pacific salmon. I really do not have any proof to back that up except my fishing experiences. What it boils down to is red salmon just plain do not attack lures like silvers, kings, chums, or pinks. Do they bite? I am sure they do everyone once in awhile, but I agree with Marcus, most reds are caught by flossing.

                        Its really easy to say a red bites when hundreds of thousands of reds pass through a single watershed in one season. Eventually your going to get lucky and hook a few in the mouth, the Kenai or Russian would be a great example. Try fishing a creek or river that has a marginal red count, say a couple thousand. You will almost never catch a red without flossing. Atleast that is what happens in my experience.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Imho

                          I have a question to ask of all of you. When was the last time that you saw a red caught on eggs, herring or any other bait in fresh water? I can't say that I have ever seen it happen, never! As with most animals, this includes fish, if you irritate it enough it will strike. As with the other salmon species they strike at a variety of bait or lures. In general you will have greater success catching most salmon with bait, although there are many variables that play into this. As for a red actually biting at your lure for what ever reason, the chances are extremely slim. As someone else stated previously, look at where your fish is hooked, 99.9% of the time you will see that if you have legally hooked a red, the hook will have entered the fish on the outside of the mouth. If you pay attention to this you will also see that depending on which side of the river you fish from dictates which side of the mouth the fish is hooked. Keep in mind the fish is almost always looking upstream not downstream. Another note to add is that you will almost never see a red that has inhaled any kind of lure/fly. Any fish that strikes at a lure/fly will consume it as if it were really food or it would crush it in its mouth as to destroy it as kings and silvers do with eggs.

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                          • #14
                            Over the years I've caught a few reds on eggs while king fishing.

                            I've also been shown a technique of making a very simple red jig that's very effective at catching reds. I've used them in slack pools where the fish are stacked up. You can definitely entice them to move and bite.

                            Even at the Russian, where I tend to floss them, if I change colors and patterns often I'll have more success, particularly when the fish get fewer and the fishing gets tougher.

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                            • #15
                              AkBighorn, from what I have been told and from what I have seen, reds do not feed on herring or other bait fish, they feed on plankton and small krill like shrimp. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong.

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