Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anchoring

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Anchoring

    I Am Heading To Pws At The End Of July And I Was Wandering If Anyone Had Suggestions On Anchoring And Camping On Shore. I Have A 22' Sr W/ht And I Will Be In The Blue Fjord Vacinity. I Have A Small Inflatable Dingy I Can Take To Shore If I Anchor In Deeper Water. Never Left The Boat Out In The Water Over Night And I Was Hoping For Some Suggestions On How To Assure When I Wake Up The Next Day It Will Still Be There.

  • #2
    Anchoring in the Sound

    I use the forest service cabins on the western side of the Sound once or twice each summer. Just returned from a 4 night stay at the Pigot Bay cabin yesterday. Fishing was slow, but we did real well on the shrimp!!!
    As for Anchoring---Its not too hard. First find a protected bay with about 30 feet or more of water. Place your anchor where you want it and put out 3 2 to 3 times anchor line as water depth. Make sure you choose a location to Anchor that will not permit your boat to go dry with the low tide, or be windblown to shore. Once setting anchor---tie what I call a ground line ( another rope) to the rear of boat and hop in your dinghy with rope and row to shore. Tie other end of ground line with plenty of slack( 20 or 30 feet) to stump or something solid on shore above high tide line. Now you can pull yourself in dinghy to boat on ground line. I always carry 2 anchors and line so that I can leave my mooring anchor in place with a float when I go out fishing or what ever for a few hours and still have another anchor in boat. When you return just pick up ground line and dinghy from shore and motor out to anchor float and tie to bow and stern. Back in the dinghy to camp again.
    I know this got kind of wordy, and sounds kind of complicated--but its really simple and a great way to feel good about mooring your boat. Not only do you have it anchored in the bay, but you also have the ground line attached in case of anchor line failure.
    This system works great for me and I see lots of other boats using it too. Hope this helps. If you want to talk more about it let me know.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks

      Thanks For The Information. Much Appreciated. I Will Post How It Goes!

      Comment


      • #4
        sack anchor may be needed

        Last May, south of Homer, I ran into a new problem while trying to do just what you are doing; anchor out, dinghy ashore. The problem was, we got into gravel that was marbles and I could pull my anchor in with one finger. It absolutely would not hold one iota. We tried dragging it all over the show to get it to bite, but that was worthless. (There was zero wind and limited tide shifts, and we were in a protected bay, too.) We finally took one dry bag and filled it with rocks. That was our anchor for 3 days. A friend said he sometimes uses a plastic mesh sack (concrete places have them for something) that he carries with him all the time just for this reason. I will be carrying some kind of tough mesh sack from now on. As someone else mentioned, put a second rope on your boat, too; one that is tied to shore. Good luck. j

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks
          I Will Fing Something To Fillup With Rocks To Bring With. Appreciate The Heads Up! I Can't Wait To Get Out Of The Boat To Camp, It Just Isn't The Same In The Boat.

          Comment


          • #6
            some bays in PWS have mooring bouy (sp) just drive up to them and tie your boat off. There is a book you can get crusing PWS. A very good book. It's at the libary or you can buy the new updated version.
            Living the Alaskan Dream
            Gary Keller
            Anchorage, AK

            Comment


            • #7
              Running a line from your anchored boat to shore may be acceptable if you are in a completely protected hole but if exposed to any winds you'd better make sure your boat can turn its bow into the wind. Make sure your extra line doesn't wrap around your anchor rode as the boat spins on its anchor. If you really don't trust your anchor to hold should you leave the boat while anchored?

              Comment


              • #8
                Main Bay

                There's good space for what you want to do on the north (right side as you enter) shore about half way in.

                Get the Cruising Guide To Prince William Sound as mentioned above. It's the Bible. You shouldn't cruise the Sound without it, and it will greatly help you enjoy the Sound every time out...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cruising Pws

                  Where Can I Purchase This Book? I Am In Sterling, And I Have Not Seen It Down Here.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    purchase

                    I think titlewave books in Anchorage has it (or used to at least) and also another book store on maybe 4th, 5th, or 6th street in downtown Anchorage. Maybe you can get it shipped to you. The authors have a web site and I tried to order it from them. Left messages that they never returned. So you may not want to go that route.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Mooring Anchor Pulley Setup

                      Check out the setup this guy devised. I built one but have never used it - always sleep on the boat (Hewes 26' AK Searunner). Seems to work pretty well for a small boat - not sure how great it would be for a larger boat. Your call. Easy to build though.

                      Mort

                      http://www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Book

                        This website sells "a cruising guide to PWS". just go to the bookstore link at the top of this page. Also, Alaska Mining and Diving has it. its worth its weight in gold when you are out there.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Since you're in Sterling, try checking at River City Books at the "Y" in Soldotna. If they don't have it on hand, they can order it for you pretty quick. They usually have a pretty good stock of Alaska outdoorsy kind of books. Might also check at Wilderness Way, since they sell sea kayaks and such...may possibly have it there (probably not too likely though).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            good setup

                            Originally posted by Mort
                            Check out the setup this guy devised. I built one but have never used it - always sleep on the boat (Hewes 26' AK Searunner). Seems to work pretty well for a small boat - not sure how great it would be for a larger boat. Your call. Easy to build though.

                            Mort

                            http://www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/
                            I have been using this setup for years. We modified it from the way we used to anchor set nets out in Ugashik bay. Just make sure you have enough tag line to the boat to allow it to fully float during high tide without floating your anchor. I don't use as long of anchor line as he suggests which may be why I have floated my anchor a time or two.

                            Problems - floating the anchor, setting the boat down on an unseen rock at extreme low tides (been there), jamming up with seaweed. Other than that it works great!
                            AKmud
                            sigpic


                            The porcupine is a peaceful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

                            Comment

                            Footer Adsense

                            Collapse
                            Working...
                            X