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Drift or Anchor for Halibut in Cook Inlet?

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  • Drift or Anchor for Halibut in Cook Inlet?

    I did a search but didn't find a whole lot of answers so I thought I would make it a poll this time.

    For years all I ever did was anchor and always did pretty well. But as I've gotten older and knowing that research shows that most accidents happen while being anchored up, since I got a different boat a few years back, all I've done is drift. I've still caught fish drifting but not like I used to anchored up. But I know people that ONLY drift. I only fish halibut in CI and as most of you know the tides can be a real pain, so this year I'm really trying to decide if I want to go ahead and buy a bunch of rope and start anchoring again or just keep on drifting?

    With the cost of going out halibut fishing these days....gas, bait, food etc..., a guy really wants to try and do the best he can when he's out there. So I'm mainly curious as to what most of you do to get your best results?

    Again, I'm just speaking about halibut fishing in Cook Inlet.

    Thanks.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  • #2
    Well I tried to make it a poll, but it obviously didn't work....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    • #3
      With the exception of one trench, I fish 100% percent on anchor. Make sure to keep a sharp knife near tbe anchor rope. And instruct everyone on board to cut it the second someone goes overboard. Dont fish out the tide to the point that the tide is really ripping hard. When you can't stay down with 2's its time for me to pull anchor anymore. Not too bad then. Wait longer and it gets exciting.

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      • #4
        The only time I ever drifted for Halibut, was when the currant from the big tides got too strong. Or, I'd pick up anchor in the middle, and move into a kelp bed and anchor back up.. We've always caught fish drifting but nothing like we would on anchor.. I sold my "halibut boat" back in 2000 because my knees were going south on me, and a time or two one of them would suddenly give out, and I came close to taking a cold bath.. Now, However, I went in halfies with the younger Son and he can do all the grunt work.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 4merguide View Post
          so this year I'm really trying to decide if I want to go ahead and buy a bunch of rope and start anchoring again or just keep on drifting?
          Thanks.....
          Don't you mean...line? Rope is for cowboys!

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          • #6
            You forgot a very effective method... Trolling.
            a nice slow troll with a big hoochie off the bluffs will get you all the halibut you need.
            I like to troll until I get a few hits, then stop and jig. Never fails.
            Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
            http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by homerdave View Post
              You forgot a very effective method... Trolling.
              a nice slow troll with a big hoochie off the bluffs will get you all the halibut you need.
              I like to troll until I get a few hits, then stop and jig. Never fails.
              I have to say that's one method I haven't tried yet. What depth of water are you usually trolling for them in?
              Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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              • #8
                I don't anchor in Cook Inlet anymore. Too much of a PIA and then a friend got stuck and almost lost his boat. I always felt that anchoring was more effective but now I just drift. The advantage is I don't need the heavy weights, just a little jig with some enhancement. I still catch plenty of halibut.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 4merguide View Post
                  I have to say that's one method I haven't tried yet. What depth of water are you usually trolling for them in?
                  50'-80' for the most part. If I am running two downriggers the one 10' off the bottom gets the halibut. I have found a hoochie and an Abe & Al metal flasher better than herring.
                  Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
                  http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by homerdave View Post
                    50'-80' for the most part. If I am running two downriggers the one 10' off the bottom gets the halibut. I have found a hoochie and an Abe & Al metal flasher better than herring.
                    Thanks Dave.....
                    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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                    • #11
                      Speaking of launching...........does anyone know what the launch fee is going to be at Deep Creek this season??? New owners.

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                      • #12
                        drifting is a PITA, as far as i am concerned, it is effective, and good for exploring new bumps and troughs, hard to drift with more than 3-4 people unless your people really know what they are doing. I am an anchor only kind of guy, really like to get close to where i think the fish are, and let them come to you. gonna be interesting this year finding a 29" hole!
                        and FWIW, Dave is spot on with the trolling, that can be very effective.
                        www.polebendersfishing.com

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                        • #13
                          If you are worried about anchoring when there is strong current just use a large buoy on your anchor line, then run a tag line to your bow so you can just drop it if need be. That is how power boats rig for anchoring in rivers, and you can get your anchor back later. It is also good for when you hook a monster and have to chase it.

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                          • #14
                            Drift or Anchor for Halibut in Cook Inlet?


                            Got this one drifting in 60' of water. Using a 1 1/2 oz barbless jig and a 6" screw tail grub. Right at #50 on the scale.


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                            Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
                            http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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                            • #15
                              dump the anchor every time!! :topjob:

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