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When have you observed burbot spawning in Alaska

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  • When have you observed burbot spawning in Alaska

    I am just curious what other people have observed. I have my own opinion about when they spawn based on my observations, but I wanted to see what other people have observed. I know when you look up online when do burbot spawn you will find a general answer of anywhere from December to April, but that is a really vague answer. I personally think it is a very narrow 2 week window of time. So I am curious what other people are seeing. When have you observed burbot spawning. Feel free to record where you observed it occurring because I know there is a lot of variation depending on the location.
    2
    December
    0%
    0
    January
    0%
    0
    First couple weeks of February
    0%
    0
    Last couple weeks of February
    0%
    0
    First week of March
    0%
    0
    Second week of March
    50.00%
    1
    Third week of March
    0%
    0
    Fourth week of March
    50.00%
    1
    First couple weeks of April
    0%
    0
    Last couple weeks of April
    50.00%
    1
    Last edited by Bushwhack Jack; 02-24-2021, 15:40.

  • #2
    Really??? I can't be the only one on here that has personally witnessed a burbot spawn. I'm just asking for timing for educational purposes (to educate myself), not asking for people's personal fishing spots

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    • #3
      Have never caught one nor watched one, but I sure would like to. Rookie question - under what conditions are you watching them/what are you seeing? Lakes are frozen, so what are you actually seeing? Movement into a different area that is their spawning habitat, or...?

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      • #4
        Yeah, I like to cut a big hole in the ice, like the kind you use for spearing pike. A trick I learned from AKhardwater. Then you can watch them. It's pretty fun. Burbot are usually deep water fish and only come up into the shallows at night to feed, but during the spawn, you can catch them in the middle of the daytime right in the shallows. It can be pretty exciting. Sometimes big groups come in and they will rub up against your tube jigs and act all crazy. LOL

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        • #5
          I just can't believe nobody is sharing any information. It's not like I am asking for secret knowledge. Just thought this would be an educational topic where everyone could benefit from the shared knowledge. But oh well. No worries. I'll be out fishing for them regardless. I just enjoy being a student of my quarry. I am always trying to gain more knowledge about the animals I am after. And sometimes you can learn more from the hunters, trappers and fisherman than the fish and game biologists.

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          • #6
            i just dont think many people fish for them. I think they are a pretty underrated fish and to the rookie eye probably a trash fish. While in college in northern minnesota we found them in 2' of water in the part of the river that didnt freeze. Not sure if it was legal or not but we were able to just grab a couple for dinner. I would guess it was around mid april or so there. As we know there really is not that much research on them up here and i think what they do when they do is very different depending on the lakes they are in. I dont think their spawn is as predicable as other species. I also think they spawn in different areas with different structure and not just one location.
            I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
            but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kwackkillncrew View Post
              i just dont think many people fish for them. I think they are a pretty underrated fish and to the rookie eye probably a trash fish. While in college in northern minnesota we found them in 2' of water in the part of the river that didnt freeze. Not sure if it was legal or not but we were able to just grab a couple for dinner. I would guess it was around mid april or so there. As we know there really is not that much research on them up here and i think what they do when they do is very different depending on the lakes they are in. I dont think their spawn is as predicable as other species. I also think they spawn in different areas with different structure and not just one location.
              Roger, good points kwackkillncrew

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              • #8
                Just do a google search I found a ton of info in one simple search.
                DENNY

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by boneguy View Post
                  Just do a google search I found a ton of info in one simple search.
                  DENNY
                  You obviously didn't read my initial question. I know how to do a google search and yes I know what all the google searches say under the sun. I wasn't asking for a textbook answer like "Burbot spawn in the winter under the ice some time between December and April" Yada yada yada. I was asking for people with actual experience in the field who have personally fished for burbot in the spring time when they are spawning (like myself) and what their own personal experiences were. If you read all the internet articles yourself you would find out that burbot spawn at different times in different locations and in different habitats. That is why I am asking for information from the fisherman, not the "so-called" experts who write scientific journals. Sorry, I am not trying to be sarcastic or mean, but your response kinda got under my skin a little bit. I've done PLENTY of internet research. Believe me.

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                  • #10
                    I think it's a privacy issue, I generally look the other way whenever I catch someone spawning. Sorry I didn't have anything constructive to say.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mark knapp View Post
                      I think it's a privacy issue, I generally look the other way whenever I catch someone spawning. Sorry I didn't have anything constructive to say.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well, I can say that they are not spawning in the Tanana in mid-february. Caught 2 during 4 days of fishing. Nice size, but not many. was hoping for more.

                        I guess that assumes fishing will be good during spawn. Couldn't see anything down the hole, like in a lake.

                        I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts on trying to fish the spawn. Is it like salmon, where they don't feed, rather protect territory during spawn. Wouldn't make sense as they broadcast their eggs and don't lay in a clutch. But read that their livers loose all the fat during the spawn, which sounds like they don't feed during it.

                        In the Tanana, you're not jigging or using visual lures (I thought burbot were **** near blind), but I haven't fished any lakes for burbot, so don't know how you are fishing for them.
                        Last edited by akgeoengineer; 03-03-2021, 18:27. Reason: More thoughts and no-one has replied to my post.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hey AKgeoengineer, thanks for the input. Yes burbot do actually eat during the spawn and I have found them to actually feed more aggressively. But burbot are iteroparous spawners, and can spawn multiple times over and over, unlike salmon who are semelparous who only spawn once and die. Burbot also have to build up their energy reserves for the spawn starting in late fall and by the time the spawn kicks in their reserves are about all spent so perhaps this is why they feed so aggressively. Never heard about their livers losing all their fat but that makes sense. I know they have oily livers. I've fried their livers in a pan before. Don't even have to add oil. Their is so much oil in them you can just use it's own natural oils to fry it.

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                          • #14
                            I'll have to start keeping the livers. Sounds good. Sounding more likely that we'll get to try some more fishing this weekend! I'll post again if we do.

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                            • #15
                              Burbot are feeding pretty voraciously about ice-out. They seem to be timing their runs up the clear water rivers when the smolts and juvenile Lamprey eels are coming downriver. The Burbot are also just behind the early Spring Whitefish runs, as are many predator fish...Pike, Sheefish...

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