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willow area ice

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  • Andy82Hoyt
    replied
    Originally posted by LIVIN907 View Post
    I was out there spearing yesterday and there was no snow, but today might be a few inches of the new stuff. There was also a solid 12 inches of ice.
    Awesome, thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • LIVIN907
    replied
    I was out there spearing yesterday and there was no snow, but today might be a few inches of the new stuff. There was also a solid 12 inches of ice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy82Hoyt
    replied
    How much snow is on Nancy? Anyone out that way today?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • homer907
    replied
    4-5 inches of ice at nancy lake

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  • mike h
    replied
    Haha a little side-by-side going through the ice isn't going to keep people from putting a whole lot of other things through the ice.

    Unless you're talking about the dog driving the jet ski.

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  • n8r
    replied
    Check out the front page of flatlake.com. It may put an end to the discussion. Be safe out there

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  • FishGod
    replied
    So, if you are skinny with size 16 shoes then you are safe on 1 inch of ice:shot:

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  • kwackkillncrew
    replied
    Best thread of 2014!


    Sent while partying

    Alaska swamp man pro staff

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  • mbrenna
    replied
    Yeah, pretty sure a wheeler is gonna break through thin ice before a person is all I'm saying. Way more weight in a small area.

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  • mike h
    replied
    Hovercrafts for ice fishing. How has this not happened yet? Sure it's a bit more expensive than a Vexlar, but there's some people pretty deep into ice fishing. You'd be able to fish on half-inch ice (or water).

    From a hovercraft entry: "The actual pressure under the craft is always the same - it's the weight of the craft divided by the cushion footprint area."

    Leave a comment:


  • AKmud
    replied
    It all depends on tire size. An 8" wide tire at 5psi won't provide as large of contact patch as a 12" wide tire at 5psi. Compare that to the same rig sporting Mat-tracks....0 psi air pressure, but a huge contact patch.

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  • mike h
    replied
    The Internet! I'll spare you the youtube video I watched, but here's Wikipedia:

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_pressure

    AKmuds point now seems embarrassingly obvious. Weight of thing divided by the amount of the thing touching the ground.

    But somehow that "roughly equals" the psi to which the tire is inflated.

    Another engineering type site said that "the air carries the load."

    Also, beware, Wikipedia says average orv has greater ground pressure than average human. Except that human ground pressure doubles while walking (because one foot is in the air), but it's still less than average wheeled orv.

    Abrams tank is also suprisingly low.

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  • Big Bend
    replied
    The tire pressure only effect the size of the foot print in this discussion. The higher air pressure results in a smaller foot print,the lower air pressure creates a larger foot print.A lower air pressure will create a lower pressure per Sq. in. weight wise on the ice.

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  • Cedarcanyon
    replied
    Weight of vehicle divided by contact area will be 5psi. The load is still concentrate over a small area, that could be a problem

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  • mike h
    replied
    Originally posted by AKmud View Post
    Mike, the psi inside the tire is how much pressure the air is putting on all the surface area inside (tread, sidewalls, rim). To calculate psi on the ground, it is the weight of the vehicle divided by the contact patch area in sq. inches of all the tires.
    I figured that if there's only 5psi against a particular piece of the tire, then the downward force could only equal the amount of pressure being put on that piece of tire, which would be 5 pounds. Just a guess on my uninformed, non-math inclined part.

    Do you have numbers to plug into your equation? I'm curious to see an example.

    How do you figure out contact patch?

    Leave a comment:

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