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  • Fishing Secrets!

    There's a lot of experience on this forum. So here goes:

    What are some of the "secrets" you have come across while fishing? Big rainbows in a strange place or time of year? Secret fly that no one uses and never fails? Not looking for any one to reveal exact locations or whatever just something in general that is unusual and exciting and worth sharing just for curiosity sake.

    --Kim

  • #2
    If I told you I'd have to kill you!!!!
    I'll hold on to my Bible & my Guns, you can keep the change!!!

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    • #3
      Really?

      Not quite a "secret" then, innit?
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Oh you people are mean. I have no problem sharing some of that data. I find Rainbows in water after the ice goes out in water between 1-4 deep If the stream has a salmon run I like to fish the egg drop on the Gulkana, Tal, Willow, Montana Creek, Russion River between the lakes near the upper falls and the Kenai. I also like to fish certain section of the Copper River system from the headwaters at Copper Lake through Chitna. If the stream does not have a salmon run I like to fish pocket water and structure.

        When Fishing my above listed spots I use several flies during the time that egg drop is not on to inlcude but not limited to scuplins, stone flies, everything bead-head and the occasional dry fly. I am somewhat of a traditionalist and do not chase them with anything but a weight forward fly line no double tapers for me no no no. I also only fish in days that end in Y between May and Oct.

        If times are tuff and the fishing slow I assisted in the development of a new Fly called a Dupont Spinner. Basically it represents only the last metamorphic phase of an adult mayfly. You have to use caution when casting it tends to be somewhat explosive and you best ensure you have enough time to back cast and release at least all 30 meters of fly line. Never fish the Dupont Spinner when people are around or everone will know your fishing skills. Please note concerning the use to be a secert fly is not considerd legal in any waters in the U.S. so I only fishin it overseas where explosive flies such as the Dupont spinner are legal.

        I know I know Sorry.

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        • #5
          Ok sorry but I had to have some fun it was and is a very long winter in Squarebanks. More to the point one thing that is a little talked about now and again but no shared or understood Kim is that Trout are Trout are Trout they have basic needs and there are some general rules of chasing them. Most road side fishing on the Parks Highway is not like let's say the Kenai or the Copper River systems i.e. not a lot of lakes for fish to hold over so that fishing tends to be better when first the available amount of water allows the Rainbows to meet their basic needs i.e. water depth, cover and food sources i.e. after ice out and before ice up. This just also happens to be about the same time the insects start to move around and become available and directly before the smolt start to move down stream which just happens to be directly prior for the most part before the Salmon start to return to the system to start the cycle of life all over again so timing / timing / timing. On systems such as the Kenai and let's say the Gulkana to inlcude the Russian which have lakes the game is similar however there are resident fish with slightly different holding water. Now mind you these are generalizations or loose rules of thumb and of course this all changes if you have Steelies in the system as well. The best fishing for the most part sorry to say is during the spawning cycle i.e. mid May through Early June and of course in order to protect the fish most if not all streams from the Kenai up to the Chulitna and across to the Copper river systems are closed to the fishing and taking of Rainbow trout till about 15 June and still most of those rivers are C&R. This does not inlcude steelhead in certain rivers but again a general rule of thumb.

          so secret number one is fishing early stick to attractor patters that match the hatch i.e. prior to smolt out fish your standard Stone attractor patters such as a Woolley Bugger size 8-4 weighted to getter down or a nice noraml stone or bead head Hares Ear etc... down and dirty I like a heavy weighted size 6 Bead head Bugger in Olive and Brown kind of a catch all that covers stones and small scuplins for most stream I fish. It also assist in matching Damsel, Crane and Draggon Fly nymphs so 1 pattern to cover 5 types of food. I still fish the same fly on the Russian during the first run of reds if I am down there and fish the structure i.e. behind rocks in pocket water behind holding salmon as well as near overhanging banks and logs and do well.

          Hope the information helps!

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          • #6
            Secret number one....Hit the lakes before ice out is complete like say when the ice is 10-20 feet out from shore cast right to the edge of the ice with nightcrawlers(Worms),Eggs...And be prepared for an exciting day..This works best at birch lake or quartz for me but may work at all lakes.
            There's a fine line between fishing....

            and standing on the shore like an idiot! ALLEN BRADLEY-TANGLE LAKES ADVOCATE/FANBOY

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            • #7
              Hey Moose and Bradley. Thanks for sharing. That's some good and solid useful info. Any one else have something interesting or unique to add that they have come across? Thought for sure this thread would see more posts?

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              • #8
                I've had the same success with this method fishing for early grayling... lay a spinner on the edge of the ice, slowly retrieve until it falls off the ice into the water, and D%mn that's fun..../John

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                • #9
                  A "secret" technique for me is fishing the lakes and small creeks at night for trout. This unfortunately only seems to work in open water and not ice fishing.

                  The best fishing often comes right as it gets dark. The big fish will continue to eat while it is pitch black out. I don't know how many times I have fished a small creek or lake catching 8 to 10 inchers all day and when it gets dark, the 10 inchers suddenly grow to 20 inch or larger fish. You don't need bait. They can see it. In fact some of the best success I have had is fishing flies when it is pitch black out. There's a reason its illegal in many area to fish trout at night in other states.

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                  • #10
                    Interesting thread.

                    To expand a little on what Kardinal stated above, started that trick targeting sea-run browns. In fact, night fishing for big, fat browns (and Atlantics) always worked best at night. Later found out it worked very well on rainbows and grayling too here in Alaska. Use black flies when night fishing as the fish can see the dark silhouette of the fly perfectly against the lighter night sky. Makes sense for a fish in the water looking up. Do not have nearly the same success rate using base colors such as red, yellow, white, etc. as they apparently do not provide the contrast needed that black does. Night fishing, black flies -- just does not seem logical at first.

                    Another item of interest. Found this spot in the Matanuska Valley where a relatively small late run of chums spawn (October) that attracts a good number of char, a few of which are almost as big as the salmon (6-7 pounds). Never seen another soul fish for them, despite this river being road accessible. Takes a little bit of a hike to get to the "hot spot" but well worth it. Location? Think I will keep that part a secret for now...

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                    • #11
                      Only wet hooks get bit.
                      "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                      sigpic
                      The KeenEye MD

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                      • #12
                        90% of the fish are caught the night before.
                        "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                        sigpic
                        The KeenEye MD

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                        • #13
                          Never leave fish to find fish.
                          "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                          sigpic
                          The KeenEye MD

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                          • #14
                            90% of the fish are in 10% of the water
                            Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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                            • #15
                              Fishing is always better yesterday
                              Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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