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Northern Pike on the Kenai??

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  • Northern Pike on the Kenai??

    I know pike have been quite successfully eliminated on the Kenai Pen. However, I find it hard to believe that it could be ďentirelyĒ.

    So if I really wanted to catch a few in my backyard, where would I go?

    I grew up catching huge pike every year on Northern Saskatchewan fy-inís (Reindeer Lake and Lac LaRonge). I know I wonít find that kind of action, but Iíd like to find a close spot where the kids could experience a bit of the excitement.

  • #2
    I hope it is 'entirely' so people won't be stocking their favorite lake with them again.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
      I hope it is 'entirely' so people won't be stocking their favorite lake with them again.
      Yeah. I grew up fishing for bass, crappie, yellow perch, walleye, pike, musky...and sometimes I miss that kind of fishing. But those fish don't belong here.
      ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
      I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
      The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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      • #4
        Had a conversation with a co worker who got on the soap box of how pike have killed the Matsu salmon runs and that they serve no purpose other than eating everything in their path and no river/lake systems with salmon could endure pike predation. He was aghast when I told him the Nushagak Drainage and Wood Tikchik Lakes in Bristol Bay are full of pike and always have been. Iím surprised pike never made it to the Matsu area over the last thousand? or so years. Just shows how delicate an ecosystem can be. I personally love Pike, but there are places they didnít belong. Time to head to Figure 8 for pike control.

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        • #5
          Back when I commercial fished a setnet site out in the cook inlet (off of Beluga River) we caught pike in our gillnets a couple of different times so they definetly can spread and could very well make their way to the Kenai. Was interesting though, they were a reddish color verses the green mottleback so probably didn't like the saltwater much

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          • #6
            I would suspect fishing for them is a waste of time here anymore.
            While there might be a scant few around I would think you'd be hard pressed to find them.
            That and many former Pike lakes are closed to all fishing at this time.
            If you really want some head north to the Matsu area lakes that still have pike in them.

            Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
            "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

            "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Seafish View Post
              Back when I commercial fished a setnet site out in the cook inlet (off of Beluga River) we caught pike in our gillnets a couple of different times so they definetly can spread and could very well make their way to the Kenai. Was interesting though, they were a reddish color verses the green mottleback so probably didn't like the saltwater much
              Very interesting observation, Seafish. Never heard of them in the salt, and never saw them in Bristol Bay waters, though as NERKA says above, they are in the lakes and rivers of the Bay. Fish are funny like that. For instance, no lake trout in the Wood River drainage of Bristol Bay, but plenty in the Tikchik drainage and across the bay in the Kvichak drainage.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Seafish View Post
                Back when I commercial fished a setnet site out in the cook inlet (off of Beluga River) we caught pike in our gillnets a couple of different times so they definetly can spread and could very well make their way to the Kenai. Was interesting though, they were a reddish color verses the green mottleback so probably didn't like the saltwater much
                Wouldnt hurt my feelings if they migrated that way, I bet the Kenai could produce some real trophies

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by iyouktug View Post
                  Wouldnt hurt my feelings if they migrated that way, I bet the Kenai could produce some real trophies
                  As if our Kenai King salmon population needs another predator!
                  No thank you!

                  Another aspect that has occured to me is that if you did happen to catch a pike or two on the Kenai peninsula you would be obligated to tell ADF&G about it immediately.
                  I would hate to see a member here get accused/charged because you had a pike in your possesion and they thought you were transporting/releasing it.
                  Especially since they feel they have successfully erradicated them here.

                  Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
                  "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                  "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
                    As if our Kenai King salmon population needs another predator!
                    No thank you!

                    Another aspect that has occured to me is that if you did happen to catch a pike or two on the Kenai peninsula you would be obligated to tell ADF&G about it immediately.
                    I would hate to see a member here get accused/charged because you had a pike in your possesion and they thought you were transporting/releasing it.
                    Especially since they feel they have successfully erradicated them here.

                    Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk

                    I se your point of view, that would be very interesting if they started catching a few here and there.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by iyouktug View Post
                      I se your point of view, that would be very interesting if they started catching a few here and there.
                      Nope. Don't want any pike here. If you want to catch pike, take your fishing gear with you on your fly in hunts across the Inlet.
                      Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE=SmokeRoss;1676524]Nope. Don't want any pike here. If you want to catch pike, take your fishing gear with you on your fly in hunts across the Inlet.[/

                        Its only a matter of time SmokeRoss, only a matter of time! The pike are just spreading here there and everywhere.

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=iyouktug;1676534]
                          Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
                          Nope. Don't want any pike here. If you want to catch pike, take your fishing gear with you on your fly in hunts across the Inlet.[/

                          Its only a matter of time SmokeRoss, only a matter of time! The pike are just spreading here there and everywhere.
                          In case you were unaware we had Northern Pike here on the peninsula for many years.
                          I have personally caught quite a few of them.
                          But ADF&G has essentially eradicated them here by using Rotenone to kill them off in all known lakes.
                          One of the pike lakes even connected to the Kenai river.
                          I suspect if we stay diligent we can keep them away or remove them if they do return.
                          I know I wouldn't want to be caught with a live pike here now days.
                          The fines alone are probably more than I make in a year if you couldn't prove it was just caught as you were fishing.

                          Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
                          "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                          "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            [QUOTE=kasilofchrisn;1676535]
                            Originally posted by iyouktug View Post

                            In case you were unaware we had Northern Pike here on the peninsula for many years.
                            I have personally caught quite a few of them.
                            But ADF&G has essentially eradicated them here by using Rotenone to kill them off in all known lakes.
                            One of the pike lakes even connected to the Kenai river.
                            I suspect if we stay diligent we can keep them away or remove them if they do return.
                            I know I wouldn't want to be caught with a live pike here now days.
                            The fines alone are probably more than I make in a year if you couldn't prove it was just caught as you were fishing.

                            Sent from my S41 using Tapatalk
                            If I pulled one up, hammer handle or larger, from one of the places I suspect they still exist, I would kill it immediately. All anyone would see is a frozen stiff, assassinated pike.

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                            • #15
                              Quite a few years back wasn't there a lake on the peninsula that had an established population of yellow perch which ADF&G eradicated?(thankfully). In more recent times wasn't there also another lake that had Muskies? While there are some species in the lower 48 that have integrated (Brown Trout) without too negative of an effect there are others (Common Carp, Silver Carp, Snakeheads) have had a devastating impact on natural fish populations.
                              I am no longer surprised at what I am no longer surprised at ---Bill Whittle

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