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Rod And Reel For Silvers

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  • Rod And Reel For Silvers

    Hi Im in need of a new outfit for fishing Silvers in August .Not too expensive 4 pice hope to use the same rod for soaking/ drifting eggs and casting spinning gear.fixed spool reel.I suppose a general purpose kind of outfit.
    I use fly gear when I can.
    Any ideas guys?


    Thanks In advance Graham

  • #2
    8 foot ugly stick and a Abu Garcia reel will get you all salmon. Even some rock fish


    Sent while partying

    Alaska swamp man pro staff
    I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
    but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

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    • #3
      I use either a 6 or 8 foot ugly stick depending on location. Longer pole will work better for flipping though.

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      • #4
        Shakespeare makes a great rod for this. This is a very versatile piece of equipment:

        Single piece rod with reel combo. Great travel-ability (is that a word?). 12 pound test works real nice. Color is gender dependent - or maybe not - not that there is anything wrong with that.

        Very reasonably priced. Lasts 2 years, then buy another one.

        http://www.basspro.com/Shakespeare-B...58_41408622871

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        • #5
          6 foot ugly stik is my preferred weapon of choice for any salmon larger than a pink. Although that being said, I've landed a 12lb king salmon with my 5' ugly stik with 6lb test. Talk about a fight! I like the 6ft because it's large enough to handle a 5-20lb fish, yet has enough bend that it gives you a good play/action and isn't overly stiff.

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          • #6
            get an 8'6 shimano convergence with a sienna reel. should be able to get both with line for under 100% lifetime over the counter warrantee on the rod. If you go shorter you will be frustrated when the guy next to you with the long rod is rocketing his spinners twice as far as you to the slot the fish are holding and you can barely get you line to it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bullelkklr View Post
              Shakespeare makes a great rod for this. This is a very versatile piece of equipment:

              Single piece rod with reel combo. Great travel-ability (is that a word?). 12 pound test works real nice. Color is gender dependent - or maybe not - not that there is anything wrong with that.

              Very reasonably priced. Lasts 2 years, then buy another one.

              http://www.basspro.com/Shakespeare-B...58_41408622871
              Fantastic post Bullelkklr this is not only a top piece of fishing kit how cool would I look on the Russian !
              I almost pi**ed myself laughing.

              I did actually see a guide at clear creek two years ago make a big show of getting the same rod out and just jigging some jig head fly.
              He landed a few good chums to the great delight of his clients .

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              • #8
                Thanks for the replies .As live4chrome suggests I would go for a longer rod we tend to use longer rods here in Scotland so It would make a good salmon rod for home as well .
                Last trip at willow my Freind's were hitting chums way out with long spinning rods I only took the fly rod and blanked .The local guys were all fishing close in and blanked that evening.
                So it has to be a long casting rod for me .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by fearnot View Post
                  Thanks for the replies .As live4chrome suggests I would go for a longer rod we tend to use longer rods here in Scotland so It would make a good salmon rod for home as well .
                  Last trip at willow my Freind's were hitting chums way out with long spinning rods I only took the fly rod and blanked .The local guys were all fishing close in and blanked that evening.
                  So it has to be a long casting rod for me .

                  I am assuming every one was standing way out in the water? Every time I have gone to Willow every one likes to stand out as far as they can. If every one would have stayed up on the shore I bet you more fish would have been caught up close. The places I like to go every one usually stands on dry ground. Last year my 7 year old son was catching silvers no more than 20 feet off shore weekend after weekend. That is one reason I dont go to willow, every one always wants to wade way the heck out where the fish should be and push the fish further out.

                  I use 15 or 20 lb test braided line and can cast plenty far enough with my 6 foot pole. If you prefer longer poles though then go for a 8 footer, I think you will like that better.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AllAlaskan View Post
                    I am assuming every one was standing way out in the water? Every time I have gone to Willow every one likes to stand out as far as they can. If every one would have stayed up on the shore I bet you more fish would have been caught up close. The places I like to go every one usually stands on dry ground. Last year my 7 year old son was catching silvers no more than 20 feet off shore weekend after weekend. That is one reason I dont go to willow, every one always wants to wade way the heck out where the fish should be and push the fish further out.

                    I use 15 or 20 lb test braided line and can cast plenty far enough with my 6 foot pole. If you prefer longer poles though then go for a 8 footer, I think you will like that better.
                    Last year the fish were in the silt line way out. If you didn't have a pole that would cast far, you were not getting any fish. But, you have to have good roe also. That stuff you buy at Freddies ain't gonna catch you many fish. I use an 8 1/2' Kunnan (not available anymore) rod with a Penn International 975 loaded with 60lb dacron. With a little weight on it, I can cast that thing a mile. Sometimes you can find these old Kunnan rods on eBay for fairly cheap. Kunnan made great rods for awhile then their factory burned down. I think they are back in business, but not nearly as good as the original rods were. Good luck.

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                    • #11
                      For the life of me I cannot fathom the popularity and recommendations of the "ugly stik" when directly related to coho fishing and soaking eggs. A durable and stout rod they are, no doubt, but they are better served doing almost anything other than bait fishing for cohos. The ugly stik is the least sensitive rod I have ever fished and they cast poorly with light terminal gear such as a #6 Vibrax and 12lb test mono, after discovering this using my 6'6" M action (10-25lb test) it became my dedicated "troll" rod for silvers sporting 20lb test.

                      A graphite composite fast action 7' one piece light (3-17lb test), using 12lb test has been my go-to for years, it has infinitely superior sensitivity to an ugly stik when fishing roe or casting hardware in the salt or freshwater. It will detect the softest "take" or "mouthing" that cohos are notorious for and that means many more chances at hooking up with a fish.

                      Do yourself a favor and purchase a graphite rod with high sensitivity, you will not regret it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by .338WM View Post
                        For the life of me I cannot fathom the popularity and recommendations of the "ugly stik" when directly related to coho fishing and soaking eggs. A durable and stout rod they are, no doubt, but they are better served doing almost anything other than bait fishing for cohos. The ugly stik is the least sensitive rod I have ever fished and they cast poorly with light terminal gear such as a #6 Vibrax and 12lb test mono, after discovering this using my 6'6" M action (10-25lb test) it became my dedicated "troll" rod for silvers sporting 20lb test.

                        A graphite composite fast action 7' one piece light (3-17lb test), using 12lb test has been my go-to for years, it has infinitely superior sensitivity to an ugly stik when fishing roe or casting hardware in the salt or freshwater. It will detect the softest "take" or "mouthing" that cohos are notorious for and that means many more chances at hooking up with a fish.

                        Do yourself a favor and purchase a graphite rod with high sensitivity, you will not regret it.

                        Its because Ugly sticks do not cost an arm and a leg to buy and they ARE a tough rod. The 6 foot ugly stick I use is the lighter one (but not Ugly Stick Light) of the two 6 footers they make. Its basically a trout rod. Last summer I had no issues casting completely across Sheep Creek with high water levels with size 4 Vibrax or roe. Also because its a lighter rod the tip is pretty sensitive and I had absolutely no issues with the tip not being sensitive enough for bait. It was sensitive enough I could tell the difference between bites and fish just hitting the line. Maybe thats why I enjoy mine is because it is lighter than what most people use for Salmon.

                        One of these days I will buy a graphite rod, but I have little kids and the last thing I want is for one of them to drop something on the pole or the pole itself and get a hairline crack and have the pole shatter on a fish lol. I dont think any one would would argue that a graphite pole is a more enjoyable rod to use how ever not every one can afford to buy one be it the cost, or the possibility of little kids having accidents around it and damaging it (meaning you have to buy another pole) lol. How ever if some one asks about a rod and is looking to stay within a budget I usually recommend the Ugly stick (the size I have) for silvers since they can be had for cheap yet are a durable rod and if you get a smaller one plenty sensitive for bait fishing. Of course any one who has the $$$ to spend on nicer gear a graphite rod is the way to go compared to a Ugly Stick.

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                        • #13
                          At trustys you can get a decent graphite rod for 40$ spend 70 and you can get one with a no questions asked over the counter lifetime warrantee (shimano)

                          Originally posted by AllAlaskan View Post
                          Its because Ugly sticks do not cost an arm and a leg to buy and they ARE a tough rod. The 6 foot ugly stick I use is the lighter one (but not Ugly Stick Light) of the two 6 footers they make. Its basically a trout rod. Last summer I had no issues casting completely across Sheep Creek with high water levels with size 4 Vibrax or roe. Also because its a lighter rod the tip is pretty sensitive and I had absolutely no issues with the tip not being sensitive enough for bait. It was sensitive enough I could tell the difference between bites and fish just hitting the line. Maybe thats why I enjoy mine is because it is lighter than what most people use for Salmon.

                          One of these days I will buy a graphite rod, but I have little kids and the last thing I want is for one of them to drop something on the pole or the pole itself and get a hairline crack and have the pole shatter on a fish lol. I dont think any one would would argue that a graphite pole is a more enjoyable rod to use how ever not every one can afford to buy one be it the cost, or the possibility of little kids having accidents around it and damaging it (meaning you have to buy another pole) lol. How ever if some one asks about a rod and is looking to stay within a budget I usually recommend the Ugly stick (the size I have) for silvers since they can be had for cheap yet are a durable rod and if you get a smaller one plenty sensitive for bait fishing. Of course any one who has the $$$ to spend on nicer gear a graphite rod is the way to go compared to a Ugly Stick.

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                          • #14
                            I would go with graphite way lighter weight. if you fish like me which is all day in summer you dont want to carry fiberglass pole all day hiking to remote spots or cruizing around catching fish. after 200 cast you will know why you pay a little more. they got st.croix and lamiglas rods
                            Got to look good even in defeat. IMAGE is everything.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the posts guys.Ill go graphite ,over 8 ft maybe pay a bit more for a good brand Ill just wait and see what feels good on stocking up day in Anchorage .

                              Need to decide on a fixed spool reel for cums /silvers that will work with my surf caster with bait from the homer spit etc.
                              Cheers Graham

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