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ANCHOR RIVER CLOSES .... Wed June 15

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  • ANCHOR RIVER CLOSES .... Wed June 15

    Hot off the press....

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...1478&year=2011
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

  • #2
    Thanks for keeping us updated!

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    • #3
      Too little too late for the Anchor...

      First-ever king cap placed on Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery

      The North Pacific Fishery Management Council has voted to establish the first-ever limit on chinook salmon bycatch in the Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery, a news release said.

      In 2010 the groundfish fleet caught over 51,000 chinook salmon. This all-time high number reinvigorated a call from coastal Alaskans and members of the NPFMC to pursue a limit for future years. While a limit on chinook bycatch was established for the Bering Sea pollock fishery in 2009, this will be the first salmon bycatch restriction in the Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery.

      "This is a critical time for getting king salmon bycatch under control," said Theresa Peterson, Kodiak Island salmon fisherman and community coordinator for Alaska Marine Conservation Council. "Central Gulf chinook runs are hurting and salmon fishermen are restricted. This is a time for the groundfish trawl fleet to be part of the solution."
      "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
      sigpic
      The KeenEye MD

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      • #4
        Originally posted by fishNphysician View Post
        First-ever king cap placed on Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery

        The North Pacific Fishery Management Council has voted to establish the first-ever limit on chinook salmon bycatch in the Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery, a news release said.

        In 2010 the groundfish fleet caught over 51,000 chinook salmon. This all-time high number reinvigorated a call from coastal Alaskans and members of the NPFMC to pursue a limit for future years. While a limit on chinook bycatch was established for the Bering Sea pollock fishery in 2009, this will be the first salmon bycatch restriction in the Gulf of Alaska pollock fishery.

        "This is a critical time for getting king salmon bycatch under control," said Theresa Peterson, Kodiak Island salmon fisherman and community coordinator for Alaska Marine Conservation Council. "Central Gulf chinook runs are hurting and salmon fishermen are restricted. This is a time for the groundfish trawl fleet to be part of the solution."
        Good to hear. 51,000 is a lot when a single streams escapement can be planned around 1000-3000 fish.
        Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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        • #5
          it will be interesting if we see an improvement in returns over 2012 and 2013. if so then the suspicions may be proven out.

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          • #6
            When will they shut down the fishery(s) on the KP before they know they can't meet the SEG ? Wait until the SEG is met - then open up some fishing....not the other way round.

            Some shut down in the salt in the area are in order also IMO - see what that does. Set the minimum SEG at the upper threshold right NOW....if it isn't reached then - voila - no fishing for anyone.

            It sure seems that the resource is NOT being put first in most, if not all, of the (mis)management plans.
            Last edited by Bullelkklr; 06-14-2011, 07:12. Reason: add NOT to last sentence

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            • #7
              +1 man that's exactly the point.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bullelkklr View Post

                It sure seems that the resource is NOT being put first in most, if not all, of the (mis)management plans.
                You just answered the big question right there. It's an extremely profitable business and the only thing these people have in mind is $$$$$$$, not sustainability. They will fish it until the fish are extinct if they can. Look at what's going on with the blue fin. That population in almost below a naturally sustainable number, yet when a single fish can sell for over $300,000 on the Japanese market, you bet you sweet ass that fishing will continue. It'll be the same with the kings. "Feel good" laws will be made, but will not be followed and nothing will be done about it. It's all about the profit and always will be.
                Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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