Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lets start a pool

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Lets start a pool

    When will king salmon restrictions happen? The Deshka weir counts have finaly fallen behind last years as of June tenth by a hundred fish. A great day on the Little Su has been a 20% catch rate(based on fee booth numbers). Most days are at about 10% Will it happen? When? What should be done?

  • #2
    I think sooner than later would be better! You can always open it up again later in the season. Its just a shame though, I remember being a kid and going to the little su and almost always limiting out with fish all over 35lbs.... Its a bummer. On a side note, I wish Fish and Game would put the weir way further downstream on the little su to get a more realistic count of fish. I know for a fact that alot of fish dont even past the wier, especially silvers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Given our immediate past experience, they won't make the call until the very last minute.... it'll be "wait and see" until they are 100% convinced the fish aren't gonna show.
      "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
      sigpic
      The KeenEye MD

      Comment


      • #4
        starting next weekend! (jun 17 or 18) If I had to put money on the guess.

        Comment


        • #5
          This Is Sad

          I have to think that it is a sad day for fishermen in Alaska when people start to bet on what date king fishing will be closed by the state F&G.
          Whether it will happen or not isn't the point.........if a closure is needed and warrented that is fine.But to even think about wagering when that'll happen and start a betting pool................:confused:
          Anyone else see a warped sense of humor here ?:mad:

          Comment


          • #6
            Mark,

            It is going to be even sadder when the mighty Kings come no more. It will start with F&G lottery drawings to see who can fish for their one day...then it will be done, caput, over.....humans have a way of messing lots of things up.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have to agree with you about human destruction.I am optomistic enough to hope that doesn't happen (total closure).Maybe that optomism is what keeps all fishermen coming back to try again and again.I just wanted to comment on starting a pool.The whole concept saddened me.
              Not trying to start a debate over causes,hatcheries,and all that this could grow into.........just saying that attitude strikes me as totally defeatist......sad

              Comment


              • #8
                I started the thread based on the last couple of years and the wait and see method. It was sarcasm. last year they waited and had just over 500 spawners in the Little Su. If that same method is used again how will the fishing be in 3 and 4 years? I say let a few more spawn and look to the future not catch what we can this summer. It is sad...everyone knows kings are not what they used to be.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I realize this was started by a MatSu dude, but it looks like the casualties have begun.

                  Anchor is the first one to fall....

                  http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...1478&year=2011
                  "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                  sigpic
                  The KeenEye MD

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I knew I was gambling when I bought that king stamp this year.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mark Collett View Post
                      I have to think that it is a sad day for fishermen in Alaska when people start to bet on what date king fishing will be closed by the state F&G.
                      I'm personally against betting so I wouldn't have anyway. I was more stating my opinion that "the writing is on the wall" and shutdowns are inevitable and that likely they will be starting before this weekend.

                      I've taken one too many stats classes in college to not see where the trend is going for 2011.

                      I'm not liking it any more than any other fisherman, at this point I'm thinking the run is poor enough I'm going to put away my king tackle for the year. Not because I don't think I can catch one but that I'm thinking I probably shouldn't.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        how about fixing the root of the problem
                        seven billion miracles is enough

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by fishNphysician View Post
                          Given our immediate past experience, they won't make the call until the very last minute.... it'll be "wait and see" until they are 100% convinced the fish aren't gonna show.
                          Guess they're officially 100% sure now.

                          Sleep tight ol' girl..... til next year.
                          "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                          sigpic
                          The KeenEye MD

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Salmon super highway no more? Yukon joins the list of the fallen... AGAIN

                            Yukon River king salmon run in question


                            by Tim Mowry / tmowry@newsminer.com

                            Jun 14, 2011 | 2780 views | 11 | 9 | |







                            FAIRBANKS — The first wave of king salmon hasn’t even hit the Yukon River yet but the Alaska Department of Fish and Game isn’t taking any chances. The state has already closed subsistence fishing in the lower Yukon.

                            As part of its plan to get more king salmon to their Canadian spawning grounds in what is predicted to be a weak king run, the Department of Fish and Game on Monday pulled one 36-hour subsistence fishing period in District Y1, which covers the first 63 miles of the river.

                            “We pulled that period anticipating that first pulse would start up,” Yukon area management biologist Steve Hayes, who is stationed at the mouth of the river in Emmonak said late Monday afternoon. “We’re still waiting for that first pulse.”

                            The Yukon’s king run typically begins in late May or early June and continues through mid July. The run is marked by three or four large pulses of fish that comprise the bulk of the run. The first pulse contains a high percentage of fish bound for Canada.

                            In recent years, the state has struggled to get enough of those fish across the border, failing to meet obligations mapped out in an international treaty with Canada. As a result, the state has adopted a conservative management strategy that reduces fishing time on the first pulse of kings.

                            Based on historical averages, the first pulse of kings is detected in a test fishery at the mouth of the river between June 12-15 and lasts four to five days.

                            If the fish started showing up Monday night or early today, it could still prove to be a good conservation move. If they don’t, the department jumped the gun in the name of conservation, Hayes said.

                            “That’s what makes Y1 so tough,” he said. “You don’t know until they’re here.”

                            The state’s subsistence fishing schedule went into effect last week on the lower river. Fishermen are allowed two 36-hour subsistence fishing periods each week. Subsistence fishermen farther up the river can still fish seven days a week, though that will change as fish move farther up the river.

                            Through Sunday, slight more than 7,000 kings had passed a sonar counter about 120 miles upriver from the mouth at the village of Pilot Station. That’s only about half of the historical average but Hayes called it an “encouraging” start compared to last year when no fish had passed the sonar by that time.

                            “We saw a pretty good group of early fish,” he said. “It was encouraging to see that.”

                            Some fishermen on the lower Yukon said there were more kings entering the river in the first week of June than they’ve seen in several years and Hayes said subsistence and test net catches were better than past years. Since then, catches have dropped off in both fisheries.

                            But the high number of early fish has fueled speculation that the run may be better than biologists were predicting back in April when the state announced it would reduce subsistence fishing time on the first pulse of kings to enter the river as part of an effort to rebuild what in recent years has been a shrinking king run in the state’s largest subsistence fishery.

                            “We still don’t have enough in-season management information to know what the run is doing so far,” Hayes said. “Once we see that first pulse and can assess it then we’ll have a better handle on what the run will look like.”

                            Until then, the department is sticking to a conservative management strategy, he said. That means less fishing time for subsistence fishermen and no commercial fishing.

                            The first fish that enter the Yukon usually do so in a trickle effect starting in late May but this year the early part of the run arrived en masse over a five-day period in the first week of June, Hayes said. That group of fish was detected at the Pilot Station sonar between June 5-9, Hayes said.

                            But it wasn’t big enough to be considered a pulse and the age composition of the fish as determined by biologists examining scales of the fish back up that theory, he said. Most of the fish were males, a sign that the first pulse has yet to arrive, Hayes said.

                            The department won’t announce any additional subsistence closures in districts further up the river until they know the first pulse of kings is in the river, Hayes said. If the first pulse is not detected in District Y1 during the current closure, the department will pull another fishing period when the fish arrive, he said.

                            “If we totally missed the first pulse in Y1 we may have to do it later,” he said.

                            Contact staff writer Tim Mowry at 459-7587.


                            Share This Article|


                            Read more: Fairbanks Daily News-Miner - Yukon River king salmon run in question
                            "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
                            sigpic
                            The KeenEye MD

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Its not all doom and gloom out there. Northern District guys have just about 2000 kings for the year now, which is at or above their 3 opener average.

                              Comment

                              Footer Adsense

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X