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The TechnoWog - Coho Killer.

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  • The TechnoWog - Coho Killer.

    Hey y'all.

    I did an SBS for this fly about 4 years ago for a friend, and since then I have posted it a few place around the 'net - thought I would share it with y'all to help alleviate the shack-nasties.

    The original technowog is credited to Frans Jansen - this is a slight variation, with larger wings for more commotion, more foam for higher flotation in rough water, and color-fast yarn for a tail. This thing is an awesome coho fly, and can be adapted to many color patterns and sizes for different looks or different species.


    Materials are as follows:
    Hook: Tiemco 8089NP sz6
    Thread: Danville 210 denier flat waxed nylon, pink
    Tail: McFly yarn, 2 strands, flame
    Body: "Funky Foam Fun" 3mm closed cell foam, pink
    Cement: Zap-A-Gap (for tacking foam), Sally Hansen Hard as Nails




    Cut 2 strips of foam 3"x3/16", one strip 1 1/2"x7/16". Separate and cut 2 strands of yarn 1 1/2".

    Underwrap if desired, then wrap in yarn tail securely.

    Place one drop of zap-a-gap on wraps, then press the two longer strips together on either side of wraps, with 1/4" of foam extending past threadline towards the hookeye.



    Wrap foam securely in place, taking care not to cut it with excessive thread tension.

    Place the short, fat strip of foam on top of the fly, again with 1/4" of foam extending past threadline towards the hookeye.

    Wrap 3 times loosely, then increase tension slowly. Unwrap 2 wraps under tension, then rewrap as slack is taken out.



    Cross out of materials and wrap the hook forward, stopping 1/4" from eye.

    Place one drop of zap-a-gap on hook at terminus of thread (threadline).

    Fold the long strips forward under slight tension, creating a bow in the foam.

    Press the two pieces together and wrap 3 times.

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  • #2
    Loop the pieces back to form "horns" on either side of the hookeye and "wings" behind the wraps, and wrap 3 times.



    Fold the short strip forward under slight tension on top of the long strips to create a "hump"at the back of the fly and a "bill" at the front, then wrap as at the rear.



    Cross out of material, then whip finish at eye of hook.






    The wrapping of foam is a delicate art...foam is easily cut under tension. The "wrap and relax" method is a pretty good way to avoid this. Don't worry if the foam spins slightly on the hook...zap a gap it down, or underwrap the hook, and you will have a good fly.

    Notes on the t-wog...

    You can use something else (like rabbit) for the tail design, but mcfly foam accomplishes 2 things:
    1. It doesn't bleed red dye all over your box when wet.
    2. it acts as a "sea anchor" and keeps the tail of the fly in the water, preventing surface tear-out when popping in moving water.

    The wings can be shorter, but if they go longer, the fly spins while you cast.

    The "horns" can be long or short, but make sure they are at least out to the edge of the "paddle" on top...speaking of which, don't make that too long, or the fly doesn't "pop" correctly.
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    • #3
      Nice and simple! Thanks for sharing.
      -Tight Lines & head shakin
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Nice tie - and great pics.
        That kind of symmetry in the finished fly is tougher than it looks.
        No habitat, no hunter.

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        • #5
          G_Smolt Thanks for the interesting tutorial ... catch coho on a dry fly, make me crazy

          Thanks again.
          This land is your land, this land is my land

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          • #6
            Thanks for the step by step G_Smolt. It is really kind of you and others to post the the detailed instructions for those of us that are "challenged" at the vise.

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            • #7
              Nice. mind sharing input on scenarios in which you find coho likely to come up top for a wog?

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              • #8
                Here are some observations...

                Early-morning and low light conditions are good times to throw topwaters to coho.

                Estuary coho seem to be more receptive than river coho in most cases. I know of a few discrete populations that are very topwater-friendly through all stages of spawning migration, but these are the exception rather than the rule.

                Generally speaking, when fishing topwaters, lightly rippled or otherwise disturbed water is better than calm water.

                Pressured fish are a low percentage topwater bet, but occasionally the "new look" of the topwater is all it takes to get reluctant fish to bite.

                As far as how to fish them, here is a little blurb I wrote on another thread last year...

                Swing it, skate it, chug it, pop it, dead-drift it, grip n' rip it...let the fish tell you what to do.

                A good place to start with a topwater in moving water is to cast it about 45 downstream and just let it swing back to you. Do that a time or two, then change it up with a stripped retrieve. If that doesn't work, cast perpendicular and pop it back to you with short strokes. If that doesn't work, try a high-speed retrieve to wake up the pool. If that doesn't work, move to another location and repeat.

                When you get a player, wait a second or two before setting the hook...DON'T yank as soon as you see the fish, because you will pull the fly out from their mouth. Wait 'til they turn. Remember - JERK, AND BE ONE.

                If you get a swirl or splash and no fish, try stopping and dead-drifting the fly for a few seconds, then starting the retrieve again. Alternately, mark the spot where the strike occurred, and dead-drift over it on the next cast.

                Topwater silvers are just about the funnest thing going with a fly rod. Something about a 10+ lb fish torpedoing your fly, vee-waking at mach II from about 8 ft out, really gets the blood going.
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                • #9
                  Sweet, Thanks. I should be carrying a few. I bet you could get pinks in the estuaries to hit them too?

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                  • #10
                    Some days, you can't keep the pinks off of them.
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                    • #11
                      Man !! that is one hightec wog !! (sweet) I have hammerd them on wogs over on chichagof , estaury fish durring a falling tide love them , and thats great advice G , dont set the hook until you see your shooting head or (compact scaggit) leaving the area !!

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                      • #12
                        Do any other colors work well?

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                        • #13
                          Red works as good and occasionally better than pink. White is ok, and chartreuse gets some action when the pink seems a little off. I fish a smaller black version for A-run steelhead and it does well.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by G_Smolt View Post
                            Red works as good and occasionally better than pink. White is ok, and chartreuse gets some action when the pink seems a little off. I fish a smaller black version for A-run steelhead and it does well.
                            I use black or purple for silvers any time the water is glassy and there's direct sun on the water, white/red early or late on bright sunny days when the sky is bright but the sun is off the water. Blue is a great one in low water. Lavender is terrific on foggy days for some reason. Funny thing, I've tied and carried orange combos of floaters for close to 30 years and never taken a fish on one.
                            "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                            Merle Haggard

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BrownBear View Post
                              I use black or purple for silvers any time the water is glassy and there's direct sun on the water, white/red early or late on bright sunny days when the sky is bright but the sun is off the water. Blue is a great one in low water. Lavender is terrific on foggy days for some reason. Funny thing, I've tied and carried orange combos of floaters for close to 30 years and never taken a fish on one.
                              Only by ALOT of trial and error can you know this much. Hat's off to you sir.
                              I am no longer surprised at what I am no longer surprised at ---Bill Whittle

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