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  • Chucking weight?

    I was fishing with a Dolly Llama for the first time today. I had some trouble with casting it. The weight made it difficult for me to load the rod in my back cast. Disclaimer, I am a poor fly caster to begin with. I basically wound up stripping the fly back at the end of my drift and than trying it shoot it out the line coiled at my feet on each cast. Any tips? It felt like a weird way to fish.

  • #2
    What weight rod were you using

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    • #3
      9' 6wt. El Cheapo Cabela's brand I bought 15 years ago.

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      • #4
        Im no expert but go on you tube and watch the essence of fly casting there should be a couple videos especially watch the double haul one .It's old but he knows what he is doing

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        • #5
          If you are bad at casting I would do some more casting without the dolly llama as that is a hard fly to cast. Maybe a wolly bugger or ESl until you get a better feel of it all. Smaller flys are easier to cast.

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          • #6
            Some tips for casting heavy stuff.

            Make sure you're using the whole rod, not just the tip.
            Slooooow down. Especially on the backcast, make sure you feel that tug back there.
            Minimize false casting.
            Drop your tip early, avoids a lot of rod smacking; the big ass fly isn't going to land pretty anyway, so go ahead, drop that tip.

            As you progress, you will learn to open up the loop. Casting heavy flies can't be done well with nice tight loops, you need to open up the loop, meaning your rod tip has to travel FARTHER than normal. More of an oval-ish pattern. This "cast" probably has some sexy name... but the gist is there. You can over-emphasize this by doing the backcast sidearm, and the forward cast normally.

            Don't be a ***** on the forward cast. Use some muscle. Not enough, and when something goes wrong that llama will bonk you in the noggin.

            My .02

            Edit: OR, get a rod designed to chuck heavy things. Makes a world of difference.

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            • #7
              Chucking weight is usually easiest using a very open cast, kind of a helicopter motion. Load your rod with the fly downstream, swing your rod over your bank facing shoulder (as you look downstream) and keep the rod loaded as you re-direct the cast upstream. A short haul just as you pull your fly from the water helps to load it. The fly on this cast will describe an arc behind your back rather than a classic backloop/foreloop. If this cast ends up a directly in front of you, instead of the 2 o'clock upstream, a second cast with a little more classic back cast fore cast as soon as the fly hits the water will let you get a good upstream position on the fly.

              As power drifter said, this is not the easiest cast to figure, as keeping the rod loaded and then transferring the load at the right time to move the fly forward take some practice.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the help. I can cast some I know I can cast the Wooley and ESL's. I had the same prob last fall fishing on the Kenai. My brother and I went on a guided trip and the guide had so much lead on to get the beads down I had trouble flinging it. I guess I just need to practice with more weight.

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                • #9
                  D cast(Not that sexy of a name)! Its the cast you use with two handers and when using sink tip! Like icb12 said, eliminate some of your false casts and shoot it out there!
                  Piscor Ergo Sum

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                  • #10
                    I'd stiffen the leader, too. Most that you buy are waaaaaay too limp in the butt. Make your own from P-line floro leader, which is a very good sub for the old Mason leader that was popular among steelhead and salmon flyrodders for most of the last 50 years due to its stiffness. Can't get Mason any more for the most part, but P-line is everywhere. I build mine with a fast taper for heavy flies, and the difference will put a smile on your face.

                    One of the tricks is to match the first section to the diameter of your fly line at the tip. For lines above 6-weight that is roughly 40-pound test. On 6-weight and lighter, 30-pound is fine for the first section. For a 7.5' leader I'd go 18" of 30#, 18" of 25#, 18" of 20#, then 12" each of 15#, 12# and 10#. You'll be very happy with that leader and weighted flies.
                    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                    Merle Haggard

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                    • #11
                      Lamas are "Chuck & Duck" at it's finest... Don't forget your hat with a bill and glasses. Safety first!

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                      • #12
                        I don't know how good of a caster you are, but what helped me learn how to cast was using a split shot on my leader when learning how to cast...........with that sinker on the line you feel the "tug" so you always know when to or about when you want to throw every thing forward. I think the important thing here is muscle memory. You do that enough your going to figure out "about where" your stuff should be before you throw it forward. The more line you have out the longer you have to wait but you get the idea.

                        Also like what was mentioned before you tube it! They have very thing on there.

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                        • #13
                          While keeping all of the above in mind, turn around and look at your back cast... A lot of problems can be fixed by observing what goes on back there.
                          "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Franken Fish View Post
                            D cast(Not that sexy of a name)!!
                            Not quite as sexy as the "Double D" cast...

                            Hayduke,
                            lots of good info here... Brown Bear's advice about a heavier butt section of leader is right on the money; its critical for turning over heavier weighted flies. Sometimes it helps to have a specialty fly line like the Rio Clouser thats designed to fish heavier flies...
                            The DL is a heavy fly, especially after its wet. Try fishing the same fly witha smaller conehead. Like Icb12 said, slow down and drop your rod tip after following thru on the forward cast to avoid some of that characteristic snap-back; this will help bring your line to the water as it unfolds rather that shock load at the end of your cast. If going for distance, keep some neatly coiled line in your hand, cast out and let your fly hit the water, then immediately back cast again and shoot all your coiled line. Watch your loops, back cast, open them up, and duck and cover.
                            Disclaimer: The DL will fish well regardless if you cast well!

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                            • #15
                              Sounds like I just need more time on the river "practicing". I think I'm not giving it enough time in my back cast.

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