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Valley Stillwater Flyfishing

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  • Valley Stillwater Flyfishing

    I started fly fishing last summer and I really enjoy it. I mainly flyfish the Valley Lakes due to the convenience. I also wanted to start hooking into some of those monster trout I would see while spearing in the winter. I'm just curious if there are other stillwater flyfishers in the Valley? Maybe we can meetup this summer and exchange tips and tricks.

    Darkhousefisher

  • #2
    Get ahold of Cube01 on this board.

    He fishes the lakes.
    Good fishermen and all around good dude.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by darkhousefisher View Post
      I started fly fishing last summer and I really enjoy it. I mainly flyfish the Valley Lakes due to the convenience. Darkhousefisher
      I'm in the same boat you are but I'm down in Kenai & almost a year behind you getting started!
      I just barely got started last year but had a ball! I only got out to a lake once (Fuller) & for a very short period of time. Had a few grayling hit but didn't hook any (Now I've heard you give them a couple seconds from the visible take so you don't take it away from them). I also hit Quartz creek for maybe a total of 3 hrs fishing.
      I really want to get up & fish Quartz creek, the Kenai, etc., but at the price of fuel & shortage of time I will probably spend a lot of time trying to learn to fish the local lakes. They are close & easy to access. There don't seem to be many folks fly fishing the lakes. Everyone is on the Kenai or Quartz, so we are definetly a minority.

      Have float tube & WILL fish this year!!!
      Vance in AK.

      Matthew 6:33
      "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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      • #4
        Originally posted by icb12 View Post
        Get ahold of Cube01 on this board.

        He fishes the lakes.
        Good fishermen and all around good dude.
        I second that opinion.

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        • #5
          I just wish cube01 would weigh in on this thread so I could learn a thing or 2
          sigpic




          I'm taking a poll
          <--------click this star if you think I should run for Gov

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          • #6
            yup lakes are pretty fun when I only have a few hours in the afternoon to go fishing.

            A few tips:
            -Look for C&R only lakes in the regs.
            -When all else fails, try and adult dragonfly pattern
            -where allowed dropper rigs are sweet
            -always have some midge patterns
            I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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            • #7
              I had fun last year at the end of may, but the mosquitos were thick. After that I spent a lot of time rafting/fishing rivers. Hopefully I'll get the canoe out on the stillwater a little more this year.
              My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                yup lakes are pretty fun when I only have a few hours in the afternoon to go fishing.

                A few tips:
                -Look for C&R only lakes in the regs.
                -When all else fails, try and adult dragonfly pattern
                -where allowed dropper rigs are sweet
                -always have some midge patterns
                Thanks for the advise. I have been using dragonfly nymphs, midges, and bunny leeches and intermediate line which seems to work well. I really like being on a small lake on a sunny day, what I really like is 90% of the time I'm the only one there.

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                • #9
                  This is what I get for spending too much time trolling the fly tying forum - people start saying decent things about me in the fly fishing forum and I don't get a chance to defend myself.

                  Anyway, darkhousefisher, e-mail sent...

                  Everyone else - I'd appreciate it if the next time someone wants to say something nice about me that they be a man and say it to my face!
                  "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

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                  • #10
                    It's seems to be more common in lakes in the Pacific Northwest but does anyone use chironomids with indicators (the ones that slide after you set the hook so you don't have a 14 foot leader in your face while floating in a tube?). Have heard good reports of success by some rather novice anglers using this technique, kinda bobber fishing, but another tool to have in the box.

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                    • #11
                      Right after iceout or while ice is still on the water but open enough float my cat I like to ply the banks with a size 8 woolybugger type and do well. Also a dragonfly nymph is a great lure at this time as well. I have tied up some chironomids and will give them a go this spring.

                      Being early on the lakes I take nice fish in lake that don't boast larger trout.

                      George

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                      • #12
                        Catch It, I just arrived up here from eastern WA. Chironomids under indicators can be THE MOST EFFECTIVE technique when the midges start coming off! A stillwater bonanza, if you will. They key in on chronies and gobble them up like Pacman. I only use the "quick release" indicators when fishing deep water but , as of late, have been using a type VI or VII sink line with a short 3-4' leader, fished nearly vertical. It gets down there quicker and hugs the bottom where the pupa are staging. Just a slow retrieve, an inch at a time. The takes are ridiculously powerful and shocking!!! Especially in lakes with large rainbows! Chironomids usually show up first in the shallower, warmer water along the banks after ice out, at which time we'd use indicators set to match water depth. On these occasions the indicators were fixed, though, say 8' up in 8-9' of water. What still amazes me, to this day, is sliding a barbless size 18 zebra midge from the snout of a 24-26" rainbow! Just doesn't seem right, although throat samples have filled vials with sometimes hundreds of pupa of all colors! I cannot wait for this doggone ice to melt so I can launch my pontoon on new water! And yes, I will initially be staring at an indicator!

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                        • #13
                          I've seen fish key in on chironies in the valley. I get way to bored to fish that way but they work really good whenever I break down and try em.
                          I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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                          • #14
                            I tried the "long leader" thing once, where you're throwing 20-plus feet of leader, or more, in deep water. It worked, but casting was problematic while seated in a pontoon boat. I've know other guys to do it, but from a standing position in a john boat! Took forever for my pattern to slowly sink down to the level the fish were at. I'd wiggle out a couple extra feet of line, which essentially became my strike indicator until I began that dirt slow retrieve. Now that was boring! Made me want to just return to kick finning and stripping a true blue, time-honored olive wooly bugger!

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