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  • What type of Fly Lines?

    What type, and or brand of fly lines is everyone using for fishing, leeches, sculpins, etc.?
    Floating?
    Intermediate?
    Full sinking?

    Bill

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bill K. View Post
    What type, and or brand of fly lines is everyone using for fishing, leeches, sculpins, etc.?
    Floating?
    Intermediate?
    Full sinking?

    Bill
    For the type, the answer would be YES... I say yes because you need to be able to change your line and technique to match the conditions of the day. I have used all of the above on the same day in the same body of water. Different sections with different depths and current speeds call for different techinques. All in the fun of foolin' fish...

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    • #3
      Rio Versitip.
      Piscor Ergo Sum

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      • #4
        Alaskan Fly Guy has it spot on different water depth, current and conditions to include wind in theory calls for different lines for the most part considering proficientcy.

        I am lazy and don't depth charge anymore so I stick with a standard Weight Forward Floating line for all fishing. I fish alot of heavy flies and add weight as need to obtain the required depth I wish to fish. Again I am lazy and old so!

        I fish some Rio's, a couple of Shark Skins, Orvis Wonderline, Teeny Lines 3-5W, and when I am piggen and jiggen i.e. cast 9-11W on Fast Streams with lots of rock I use a lot of Cortland 333's. Just can't see trashing a great line fishing Reds and Kings. Ok I am lazy, old and Cheap!

        Tight Lines!

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        • #5
          Most of the time, if I am fishing leeches or sculpins I am throwing them with a two-hander on a Skagit setup. My out-of-the-box (as in, not custom) choice of lines is AirFlo Skagit compact in whatever weight happens to work for the rod/tip/fly combo. My personal fave for my 7132 is a 510 for most tip combos, but my all-time favorite line in terms of cast- and fishability was a chop-job 26'4" 500gr that I made from an old prototype line...I lost that particular one in CA this winter, so I made another from an old SA skagit "peach" that I got.

          The two hander really is the easiest way to throw big flies on heavy tips...I occasionally use 12.5'-15' of t-16 (200-240gr) and 7"-8" flies for big fish, and the only way to throw these effectively and efficiently is with a skagit setup.

          For singlehand leech fishing where a herky-jerky motion or lots of stripping is required (salmon, dollies), I fish with a floating line. The floating line imparts vertical action to a linear retrieve, making for an irresistible combination. Like Moose, I add weight to get down as needed, but I don't fish tips with the singlehander.

          For singlehand line choices, I like AirFlo Striper for working with bigger, heavier coho flies, and AirFlo Technical taper for working with smaller leechy-looking stuff.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Airflow Skagit-shorthead 390 with t-17 or a floater on the single hander
            I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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            • #7
              Hey Bill K I hate to hijack your thread but while folks are thinking of your original question I thought I would ask:

              What is the best shooting in all weather(winter Kenai to summer FBanks) floating line?
              I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

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              • #8
                I like 3m's shark skin. It is pretty decent and it isn't to steep about $95.

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                • #9
                  If you want the best SHOOTING line, I would go with AirFlo 40+ extreme. 87' of super-thin ridged running line mated to a 35' head, and the heads are up-weighted 3 to 4 line sizes. This line is capable of some amazing line speeds and incredible 120' + casts.

                  AirFlo also makes the Ridge RangeFinder Distance line, which is a 62' head with a long rear taper that is perfect for aerializing huge amounts of line. The ridgeline running line allows for less friction on the shoot, so if you have the mechanics, this line can easily go over 100'.
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Thanks, for the info.
                    I usually only fish intermediate's & sinking lines for stripe bass in saltwater.
                    When I fish for salmon & steelhead, I use a floating line, with split shot on the leader.

                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bill K. View Post
                      Thanks, for the info.
                      I usually only fish intermediate's & sinking lines for stripe bass in saltwater.
                      When I fish for salmon & steelhead, I use a floating line, with split shot on the leader.

                      Bill
                      Up here too - I think you can fish a lot of water using a floating line only, at least here in the Anchorage, Kenai, MatSu area.

                      Spare spool: I usually buy a spare spool for my main 7/8 wt rod/reel; for a multitip line. +1 on the Rio Versitip too, as suggested by Franken Fish. Been lucky for me.
                      No habitat, no hunter.

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                      • #12
                        Bill,
                        I fish a lot of sculpin and leech patterns myself and use mostly Rio lines. I fish their Outbound Short 7 on a 7wt single-hand or on my 6wt switch rod; it has a 30ft head of Type 6 with an intermediate running line... great for dredging deep when you need to. As far as floaters go, I like their Nymph and Rio Grand lines. Also, Rio lines have welded loops for quick leader connetions; sometimes I'll even run a length of T-14, loop to loop, for an instant sink tip set up.

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                        • #13
                          Jocko, thanks for the info. That is what I was looking for! I want to set-up, an 11ft.--8wt. switch rod. I will look at the Rio lines.
                          When you use the T-14---How long is it? And how deep of water, are you using it in?
                          I have used the T-14 in deeper saltwater, it does get down.

                          Bill

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                          • #14
                            I went with the Sharkskin Steelhead line. Thanks for the input. I am taking it to the Kenai this weekend so we'll see how it works.
                            I have such a hard time trying to decide which outdoor activity to do every chance I get!! Living in AK is a mental challenge

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ADUKHNT View Post
                              I went with the Sharkskin Steelhead line. Thanks for the input. I am taking it to the Kenai this weekend so we'll see how it works.
                              You wont be disapointed!

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