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big trout fly

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  • big trout fly

    I dont do a lot of fly fishing so I was hopeing some of you could help me out. There is a lake I fish in a lot that has a huge trout in it! I honestly think this fish is over 30 inches. I have been playing cat and mouse with this fish for 2 years with spinning tackle. I can never get it to strike. On almost every trip I go on I get this fish to follow my bait or lure back to the boat but never take it. I have even tried fishing for it just at night. I had luck catching some stubborn big browns this way back in arkansas but so far I cant catch this fish. As soon as the ice melts I am going to start after the fish again but this time with a fly rod. I am looking for advice on flies that do better on bigger fish. I know that the lake has a lot of small green fish in it with a spine on their back. I tried using a small green jig to mimic them but had no luck. The fish does follow the green jig back to me more than any other lure. One of the first flies I am going to try is going to be an olive wollybugger. I have had luck catching big browns with them back in Arkansas. I have not tried them up here. Thanks for any advice.
    "A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine." Marley and Me

  • #2
    reason

    Im only asking because this is my last summer here. I'd love to catch the guy and take a picture to get a replica made but I'll be just as happy when I leave knowing it won. That fish has my respect either way.
    "A dog has no use for fancy cars or big homes or designer clothes. Status symbol means nothing to him. A waterlogged stick will do just fine." Marley and Me

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    • #3
      bunny leech

      Try a green or black bunny leech, or maybe a dolly llama.


      Jake
      All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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      • #4
        Dynamite...

        The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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        • #5
          dynamite

          I think dynamite would be a little to much if you intend to release it..... Go with an M-80.


          Jake
          All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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          • #6
            No matter what time of year....whenever I've fished a bead headed olive wooly bugger I've caught the biggests ones of the day. When the waves pick up and The fish stop rising as frequently......I go from throwing dry flies to trolling a woolly bugger/w sinking line and It seems to trigger good strikes.
            www.freightercanoes.com www.copperheadalaska.com
            sigpic
            matnaggewinu

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            • #7
              Kidding of course.

              First thing. Don't tell anyone where the lake is.

              Second, get some #2 beadhead olive woolly buggers.

              Third, beer.

              How could you fail
              The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mainer_in_ak View Post

                bead headed olive wooly bugger

                .
                ARKY, we posted this at exactly the same time. Great minds think alike
                The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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                • #9
                  If he is really that big and the other suggestions don't work, I would try a deer hair mouse at night. But, don't forget the beer.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by danattherock View Post
                    Kidding of course.

                    First thing. Don't tell anyone where the lake is.

                    Second, get some #2 beadhead olive woolly buggers.

                    Third, beer.

                    How could you fail
                    Well, my first thought was a #4 beadhead olive woolly bugger.

                    I've been racking my brain for about 5 minutes trying to think of what I'd use after that... but I pretty much just use beadhead olive woolly buggers for spring stillwater trout. Maybe a black or brown leech pattern. Clouser or muddler maybe...
                    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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                    • #11
                      A good sized lake dragon nymph would be another great fly to try. These are large enough for a good sized meal for it when the ice comes off the lake. I have had some great success with this fly right after ice out in the mat-su valley lakes.

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                      • #12
                        try a scud under a bobber a few inches from the bottom
                        I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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                        • #13
                          Catch a dragonfly, tye it to a hook (gently but sufficiently), and work it in the proper direction. The action is very lifelike and you are almost guaranteed a strike. What you do from there is up to you!
                          ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

                          "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
                          just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

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