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  • flys to tie

    Well I'm about to make a run to the store to get some tying materials, and I was wondering what type of flies i should start tying up for spring time trout fishing. Mainly on the willow, montana, little su and surrounding streams, also around kenai. I've still got some stuff for the trusty ESL, so im looking for other options. Thanks.

  • #2
    Not big on tying myself, but I would want to have some smolt patterns (thunder creek, blue smolt, or similar) and matukas for the trout. Perhaps some #6 olive bead head woolly buggers (my fav for grayling). Also, #10 bead head zug bugs or prince nymphs for the grayling. You will need to make your own in the zug bug and prince nymph most likely. I can't ever find them any larger than 12.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    • #3
      valley streams

      The dolly llama has been a very productive fly for the valley streams. I have had the best luck with llamas tied in black and white.


      Jake
      All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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      • #4
        hmm thanks for the info dan. And Jake, I have a dozen or so dally llamas, all in black and white, but they just never produced for me. Do they typicaly have a cone head on them? Because ive noticed it is just too heavy for most streams i fish in and seems to get stuck on the bottem too much. I have however fished them on the kenai in october and caught some large rainbows which was a surprise. I ran out of flesh so i decided to try it out because it was the only thing i had resembling flesh.

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        • #5
          The only ones I have used were coneheads. Got the from www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com Some good pics there. Awesome place to buy flies from. I got the olive/white and they work well for big dollies. But like you said, it depends on the waters you are on.

          I had some beadhead woolly buggers tied to my specs. And they worked very well. Just a size #4 beadhead woolly bugger, purple maribou body with pink hackle collar. A little lead wrap on the hook shank. When I got them in, I painted the heads pink to match the hackle and a touch of clear coat for durability. This fly tore the dollies up. I suspect it would do well on bows as well.
          The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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          • #6
            llama

            I always tie them with a cone head on them. I also tie them in different sizes, with different amount of weight tied in. You might try a size 6 with very little weight for the valley streams, and a size 2 or 4 with the front hook weighted for faster waters like the Kenai. When you fish them, are you adding any weight to your leader? Are you using a floating line? I usually loose a few to snags/bottom, but that is where I find fish too.

            Jake
            All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

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            • #7
              zonkers, lots of zonkers
              I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by jakec5253 View Post
                I always tie them with a cone head on them. I also tie them in different sizes, with different amount of weight tied in. You might try a size 6 with very little weight for the valley streams, and a size 2 or 4 with the front hook weighted for faster waters like the Kenai. When you fish them, are you adding any weight to your leader? Are you using a floating line? I usually loose a few to snags/bottom, but that is where I find fish too.

                Jake

                I never use any extra weight to my leader, and I use a floating line. I'll have to try tying a few, I haven't tied any myself before so i'll just experiment.

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                • #9
                  WB/ESL can be very versatile pattern...

                  The leech patterns we use up here, Woolly buggers and Egg-Sucking Leeches - can be tied light or heavy, short or long, dark or light, sparkly or flat, with long rabbit strip tails or short maribou tails... with eyes or not and all manner of variations. Be ready to offer fish something different any time of year.

                  1. Tied in white, they imitate smolt - for spring trout - and work well.

                  2. Different for me this Spring will be tie up some unweighted smolt patterns for working higher in the water column than usual - inspired by a comment Ak Powder Monkey made. Past few years, I've favored weighted leeches - wrapped with lead wire, then with heavy cones or dumbell eyes. But I think APM is right, the fish will go where the smolt are.

                  Best of luck this Spring... only 3 or 4 more months...
                  No habitat, no hunter.

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                  • #10
                    Dolly lama for the Kenai

                    Originally posted by griff View Post
                    hmm thanks for the info dan. And Jake, I have a dozen or so dally llamas, all in black and white, but they just never produced for me. Do they typicaly have a cone head on them? Because ive noticed it is just too heavy for most streams i fish in and seems to get stuck on the bottem too much. I have however fished them on the kenai in october and caught some large rainbows which was a surprise. I ran out of flesh so i decided to try it out because it was the only thing i had resembling flesh.
                    I had excellent success with green and white dolly lamas on the Kenai last fall. In fact, I've been tying them pretty dilligently for the last couple of weeks (I'm a slow tier). I've come to the conclusion that given the size of these things, I'm going to have to buy another large fly box just for these and other articulated flies like them.

                    I only fish these in deep water. For small streams, it might be worth tying some smaller, lightly weighted patterns. Hmmm.....

                    I tied a few last week with "I-Balz" instead of a cone head, as well. I have no idea if it will work, but much of the "research" says many game fish key-in on the eyes of their prey. I can't see why it wouldn't work at least as well...We'll have to see this spring, I guess.

                    I love catching trout on beads, flesh and nymphs, but there is just something about catching them on streamers and dry flies. I think it's the fact that every strike comes as a surprise. I'm half expecting it, and hoping for it, but when it actually happens, it is so violent and swift, that it takes me by surprise.

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                    • #11
                      if there happen to be smolt migrating on the surface you will want a sparsely weighted thunder creek
                      I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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                      • #12
                        You tyers seen this site?:
                        http://www.flytyingforum.com/index.php?

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                        • #13
                          Anohter online source..

                          http://www.alaskaflyfishingonline.com/afb/index.html

                          Some of the more popular Alaska patterns are here with good instructions.
                          The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by danattherock View Post

                            I had some beadhead woolly buggers tied to my specs. And they worked very well. Just a size #4 beadhead woolly bugger, purple maribou body with pink hackle collar.

                            No pictures of the pink hackle flies, but here are some pics of the same flies I had someone make. You can only see the purple and olive maribou in the picture, but half was white maribou and half was colored. This pattern worked very well on the dollies/grayling. Just thought I would show you a picture.












                            .
                            The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Another Cool Tying Link.

                              Here's a link to a site with some really good step-by-step videos on how to tie various patterns that would all be good in AK.


                              http://www.flyandfloatfishing.com/fly_tying_videos.htm

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