Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Boat Trailer - Alum or Galv?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Boat Trailer - Alum or Galv?

    Hello all,

    After having some boat trailer problems like the bearings/races coming apart with the wheel coming off at lauching, I decided total weigh my trailer/boat package. I had about 500 pounds over the trailer capacity and the gas tank was roughly 2/3 fuel with another 300-400 lbs fuel to add. I bought the boat and trailer new from a local dealer so I'm a little disappointed that I'm that short on trailer capacity as I don't have much gear on board.

    So I'm going to purchase a new trailer and was wondering if I should purchase aluminum or galvanized trailer? I going to get disc brakes with electric. I'm learning towards triple axle to reduce the tongue weight as well. Other considerations? What about dealer?

    Thanks for the help.

    Boat is a Kingfisher 2525, with King 5800 capacity trailer.
    Ryan
    Kingfisher 2525 Honda 225 & 20

  • #2
    I had Loadmaster trailers in Port Clinton Ohio build the trailer for my lobster boat, 1st class outfit that knows their business. Trailer is steel that was hot dipped galvanized, 3 6000lb axles, electric brakes on all axles, 16" tires, brake flushing system and a 7ft tongue extension so i don't have to get the truck brakes wet in saltwater when launching/hauling.
    sigpic
    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

    Comment


    • #3
      While stationed back east our son-in-law had an outfit in Florida known for their custom trailers build him a double axle aluminum for his 23' fiberglass boat. Wow. What a trailer.

      But some things came to light after a few years in and around the salt. Steel (as in axles, fitting etc) is a bad mix with aluminum for electrolysis. Lotta extra care and prevention involved. He doubts he'll ever own an aluminum trailer again, opting instead for hot-dipped galvanized like Potbuilder.
      "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
      Merle Haggard

      Comment


      • #4
        http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/4597414521.html

        Would be perfect for your Kingfisher


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
        Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

        Comment


        • #5
          http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/4573713166.html



          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

          Comment


          • #6
            Go for DD's brakes and do the hydraulic electric set up.
            2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

            Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BrownBear View Post
              While stationed back east our son-in-law had an outfit in Florida known for their custom trailers build him a double axle aluminum for his 23' fiberglass boat. Wow. What a trailer.

              But some things came to light after a few years in and around the salt. Steel (as in axles, fitting etc) is a bad mix with aluminum for electrolysis. Lotta extra care and prevention involved. He doubts he'll ever own an aluminum trailer again, opting instead for hot-dipped galvanized like Potbuilder.
              BrownBear, thanks for the information. Is there a fix like using SS fittings/bolts, SS disc brake, etc?
              Ryan
              Kingfisher 2525 Honda 225 & 20

              Comment


              • #8
                I have an aluminum triple axle and been using it in salt for 6 years now and haven't noticed any electrolysis that I can tell though I only launch/retrieve a couple of times a year since I keep my boat in a slip and hose it down thoroughly after use. A couple of observations though, your boat is light enough you can use a double axle just fine. Triples are a pain if you ask me. Harder to maneuver, scrubs tires turning tight, 6 tires to buy when you need to and harder to get weight level to load the axles evenly. I also changed out to Kodiak all SS disc brakes. I'm only a mile from the launch and the drums had a habit of locking up since they weren't used much. Hope this helps and good luck with your trailer purchase!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by rpdeines View Post
                  BrownBear, thanks for the information. Is there a fix like using SS fittings/bolts, SS disc brake, etc?
                  He went back through and changed out everything for stainless he could find. But that still leaves springs, axles, hubs and more. He's in and out of the water a lot, and after each launch the trailer sits for a long day with salt on it unless a guy takes the time to wash down the trailer after launching and before setting out. Not. You can work around the electrolysis, but "work" is the word. And spend extra replacing things with stainless if they weren't done in the first place. Not all aluminum trailers are bad, obviously, but I'd be real nitpicky before signing the contract for one.
                  "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                  Merle Haggard

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    How about just putting heavier axles under the trailer you have now.... I have done that before and it is a lot cheaper than a new trailer as I am sure the frame wont be much heavier on a higher capacity trailer, just different axles for the most part.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To help all the steel/galvanized parts from rusting maybe try spraying it all down with Fluid Film or CRC #3. The biggest problem with aluminum and stainless is they don't like each other and weld themselves together unless some kind of bushing separates them and you know how long a nylon/plastic bushing will last on a trailer with a bigger boat on it. If you'd like to take a look at my trailer its here next to the pot barn in Palmer.
                      sigpic
                      Alaska Shrimp Pots

                      Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
                      Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
                      Ropes, Buoys, Bait
                      alaskashrimppots.com
                      akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
                      907 775 1692

                      Comment

                      Footer Adsense

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X