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49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

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  • 49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

    Probably could have shortened it down and I would have looked better in the process. But since the fish is safely in the freezer, I'll post the circus. Not sure if the A1 buoy was pulled under or if it was caught in my pedal drives (which could have been a disaster) I need to get a better system down. I suppose we should learn from our mistakes.

    A personal best halibut from a kayak for me. Even from a powerboat I have only managed 75 lbs which is the next goal from a kayak. Taped out at 49.5" which several of the weight/length charts I saw, put it at 57 plus pounds.

    Steep learning curve. This halibut fishing is pretty new for me. I'm lucky to have gotten this one I think.


  • #2
    Inspiring stuff. Nice catch!

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    • #3
      Use a very small rubber band to hold the harpoon tip on the shaft. You will have to experiment with the size/diameter. just make sure it is very lite and does not need a second wrap. It should come off with the point or break off as it goes through the fish.
      Then lay out all the line be hind you. I would use twisted polypropylene to reduce the knots and it floats. It will feed off the deck better.
      Is there a hole to set the handle of the harpoon in so it points up but is out of the way? That way you can just reach over and grab then stick.
      Also don't pull the butt's head out of the water till you are ready. It makes them all kinds of upset.

      I am really wanting a sit on top.

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      • #4
        My connection is too slow to screen the vid, but reading between the lines...if I were working from a sit on top, I'd prefer (let me count the ways) a flying gaff over a harpoon.
        ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
        I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
        The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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        • #5
          Hey Kardinal, I am really interested in getting into this, where can I find info on the set up you guys use? Im curious about whats going on with the buoy, is it just attached to the harpoon head so you can drag your catch to the beach? Also, what kind of price do these sit-on-top kayaks run?

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          • #6
            Well done!......I like harpoons myself, perhaps just a wood one and cut it shorter so you don't have so much to deal with.

            Either way, nice work, I got a 60 lber in my power boat solo on Saturday and thought it was a challenge.....humbled.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Burntfrog View Post
              Hey Kardinal, I am really interested in getting into this, where can I find info on the set up you guys use? Im curious about whats going on with the buoy, is it just attached to the harpoon head so you can drag your catch to the beach? Also, what kind of price do these sit-on-top kayaks run?
              Thanks for all of the advice everyone. I'd recommend taking a quick peek at a website I'm working on. Alaskakayakfisher.com

              The buoy is just attached to the harpoon head. Too scary to tie it off like on a powerboat.

              Paddle kayaks start around $600. My pedal kayak is $2,000. You'll want a drysuit. Another $500. But think of all the launch fees and gas money you will save!!

              PM me if you want more detailed info! Or better yet stop by this weekend!


              AlaskaKayakFisher.com
              Guidesak.blogspot.com
              My personal pages...I'm not a guide.

              Comment


              • #8
                http://www.ifish.net/board/showthread.php?t=399813

                Here is a good link to another method for attaching the harpoon dart to the shaft to keep it from slipping off.

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                • #9
                  I tie a small bungee very tightly on the handle just above the shaft. I put the harpoon point on the tip of the spear and run a loop on the cable/ line up thru the bungee. I also use a small clip like one on a dog leash to afix my harpoon line to the cable of the spear. 5 feet up the harpoon line I tie in a bouhy. another 10 feet up the harpoon line I tie off to a double wrap of bungee and then tie the bungee to a solid point on my boat. Get them up, harpoon thru soft belly...they run and meet lots of resistance which tires them quickly. As soon as I can haul them back up they either buy a .38 to the head or a cut gill/s with a big long bladed knife... has worked for 30 plus years from kayaks to zodiacs to hewescrafts...fresh hali sounds really good about now.

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                  • #10
                    Awesome video! I am impressed with your Kayak set up, looks like a sweet rig. When you harpooned the halibut, did your fishing line pull/snap? Also, I understand your system right now is working fine; but ever consider bringing a .22 pistol in place of the harpoon? Seems like it would make for a very fast/easy dispatch on larger halibut from a small boat like that.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Anythingalaska View Post
                      Awesome video! I am impressed with your Kayak set up, looks like a sweet rig. When you harpooned the halibut, did your fishing line pull/snap? Also, I understand your system right now is working fine; but ever consider bringing a .22 pistol in place of the harpoon? Seems like it would make for a very fast/easy dispatch on larger halibut from a small boat like that.
                      Thanks! I have no idea how I snapped my 200lbs mono leader. So I need to re-evaluate that. I would also disagree that my system is "fine". lol. I am still trying to figure it out. So ANY input is greatly appreciated!!

                      On my most recent video, I harpooned a halibut and the tip just bounced off. I must have hit the spine or head perfectly because after that, the halibut never moved. This supports your idea that a .22 would be a potential tool. My major hesitation is that I am not sure a firearm, me, and an oversized piece of tupperware is a good mix. I have bonked myself in the leg trying to dispatch a halibut. I could only imagine had it been a gun. lol. Ok I'd be more careful but still.

                      I'm also looking to target salmon sharks at sometime and a more efficient means of dispatch might be necessary. I agree that a .22 could be a great tool for most people. But given my disorganization, saltwater, and just fear of stupid thing I do to myself....I think I may stay away from firearms for now....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
                        Probably could have shortened it down and I would have looked better in the process. But since the fish is safely in the freezer, I'll post the circus. Not sure if the A1 buoy was pulled under or if it was caught in my pedal drives (which could have been a disaster) I need to get a better system down. I suppose we should learn from our mistakes.

                        A personal best halibut from a kayak for me. Even from a powerboat I have only managed 75 lbs which is the next goal from a kayak. Taped out at 49.5" which several of the weight/length charts I saw, put it at 57 plus pounds.

                        Steep learning curve. This halibut fishing is pretty new for me. I'm lucky to have gotten this one I think.
                        Boy the looks like a lotta work. My hat's off to ya for sure.

                        Yeah, the 22 in the kayak may be a little on the "scary" side. Besides, if you don't hit them in the right place with that little slug, you could unload a whole cylinder into them and still not kill em.......lol.
                        Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Rudy -
                          Would you be willing to share some of your advice on jigging halibut. I have only fished in Resurrection Bay (salt) out of a kayak over the last few years. I've kept it pretty simple with just bumping a jig on or close to the bottom up and down slopes to 60' - 80' of water. This has become my best technique for getting results. Halibut to 32", rockfish and some flounder.
                          I've also trolled a little along the beach while en route with some success. Just using spinners and spoons.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
                            I'm also looking to target salmon sharks at sometime and a more efficient means of dispatch might be necessary. I agree that a .22 could be a great tool for most people. But given my disorganization, saltwater, and just fear of stupid thing I do to myself....I think I may stay away from firearms for now....
                            I can't believe you said that! You are the one-man-band of ocean fishing. I've never seen anyone as organized as you!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              49.5" (~57lbs) Halibut from Whiskey Gulch off my outback - video

                              Originally posted by fishnhunt View Post
                              Rudy -
                              Would you be willing to share some of your advice on jigging halibut. I have only fished in Resurrection Bay (salt) out of a kayak over the last few years. I've kept it pretty simple with just bumping a jig on or close to the bottom up and down slopes to 60' - 80' of water. This has become my best technique for getting results. Halibut to 32", rockfish and some flounder.
                              I've also trolled a little along the beach while en route with some success. Just using spinners and spoons.
                              First of all, Sayak, you only see the beauty of video editing. Haha. I'm a total slob. But I love the kayak fishing for making me be more organized. Ever invite someone fishing and that guy shows up with 10 rods and three tackle boxes? I WAS that guy. lol. But it was all in shopping bags stuffed into a duffel bag. Haha.

                              As far as sharing my technique, I'm embarassed to say I am no expert. I also think cook inlet is very different than Seward. But let me share some observations.

                              First you likely aren't going to Anchor. So that rules the number one technique available out that the powerboats use. So?

                              I figure the main purpose of anchoring is to create a scent field. So as I drift, I almost act like a Nascar pit crew on a bait change. Stop my drift. Hold position best I can. Have bait ready. Up and down as fast as possible.

                              I use bait almost exclusively. It just works better for me...and I'm lazy since I fish so many hours.

                              Another disadvantage to a kayak is speed. I try to use that to my advantage. I catch most of my fish on a slow troll...not drift. Think about how a scent field would disperse drifting vs cutting across the current.

                              The other observation I have is pounding the bottom is definitely an attractor. I use 12 to 24oz weight on a spreader bar. 50lbs spectra. That allows me slow troll while making contact with the bottom. Even while drifting. I will always aggressively pound the bottom before putting it a few ft above bottom to rest.

                              I use a large hoochie to make sure I'm always fishing. Also, I do NOT like circle hooks from kayaks. Hook up ratio falls and I've had at least three fish cone all the way to the surface, open their mouth, and hooks come out. I just don't think you can consistently apply enough pressure off a kayak to properly set a circle hook. I run gamakatsu big river 12/0 hooks.

                              Finally, be prepared to hook the 200 pounder. Last year I couldn't get a halibut into my net. Major bummer. Vowed not to let that happen again so I set up with a harpoon, shark hook, and boca grips. It's probably not going to happen, but it makes the 50 pounders easier.

                              So I'm sure there's lots better specific advice from more seasoned halibut veterans but those are my observations from a kayak.




                              AlaskaKayakFisher.com
                              Guidesak.blogspot.com
                              My personal pages...I'm not a guide.

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