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  • Cargo Storage

    This may seem like a very simple question but how are all of you storing your gear? This is our first year on the rivers so I just want to do see what everyone else is doing.

    I have a 13ft round boat non self bailing. I think that all gear should be kept off the floor to reduce the risk of running a ground. Are most of you just using cargo nets and if so is this cargo net worth the money http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...m-1805-To-1802

    Thanks

  • #2
    Gear stowage on round boats

    Originally posted by windswept View Post
    This may seem like a very simple question but how are all of you storing your gear? This is our first year on the rivers so I just want to do see what everyone else is doing.

    I have a 13ft round boat non self bailing. I think that all gear should be kept off the floor to reduce the risk of running a ground. Are most of you just using cargo nets and if so is this cargo net worth the money http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...m-1805-To-1802

    Thanks
    Wind,

    To suspend your gear off the floor of a round boat, you need a CARGO PLATFORM, which is secured to the boat by straps running through the D-rings on the platform, and to the rings on the boat. Note that some round boats require additional D-rings to properly support the load. The cargo platform should be suspended two or three inches off the floor.

    The net you pictured is a CARGO NET that is used over the top of your load, to keep items from falling overboard in the event of a capsizing. This too is secured to the D-rings on the boat.

    Finally, note that some self-bailer pilots load their gear directly on the floor. I prefer suspending it, but to each his own. Catarafts are rigged a bit differently but the concept is the same.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    Michael Strahan
    Site Owner
    Alaska Hunt Consultant
    1 (907) 229-4501

    Comment


    • #3
      I got the cargo platform that Mike suggest. I also have a bucket. Mine is 14.5' and I went with the large size. Have not put it in the boat yet though. This sounds like a good way to store gear in the raft, cargo net on top if you choose. With a non self bailer, I would consider getting the gear off the floor a must.
      The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks guys, that makes more sense. I will get the platform and the net. Do you think two of each will be an overkill for a 13ft. Reason being I figure the cargo in the back and the dogs on the other platform on the front.

        Comment


        • #5
          I would just use one for the back of the raft. Keep the dogs nails short and let them go where they want. Likely, they will do this anyway.
          The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

          Comment


          • #6
            That's true, thanks again.

            Comment


            • #7
              On the Floor...

              I run AIRE self-bailing rafts, a 13' 6" Super Puma and a 15' 6" D series, both with inflated floors. Unlike others, I just toss in every bag onto the raft floor. Rafts fill up so fast, I need every inch of space. Figure that the oarsman gets most of the middle third of the boat and the passenger(s) get most or the front third, so that only leaves the aft third for gear bags. Your 13" boat is going to fill up everywhere fast.

              Back in my old avon non-bailers I did put a few holes in boats when I got lazy and did not use suspension nets to get the gear off those floors. But with the new inflated floors I now routinely put the gear bags directly on the floor. I have not screwed-up one of my AIRE self-bailer, inflated floors, so far.

              I see many dogs on Kenai River rafts...have not seen them sink one yet...but would suggest toe-nail maintenance and inspection to absolutely keep your boat looking good.

              Dennis
              AK TAGS
              Imagine (It's easy if you try)
              …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
              (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

              Comment


              • #8
                loading rafts

                well- first of all when you put a lot of gear on the floor you change the handling characteristics of any raft (AKA- round boat) even a self-bailer. It is important to distribute the weight on the flotation of the tubes. This lets the floor do its thing. A cargo net is imperative for heavy loads. And Dan as you should well know a Siberian tiger would not put a hole in your SOTAR!!
                cheers- Goo

                Comment


                • #9
                  More on cargo stowage

                  Originally posted by windswept View Post
                  Thanks guys, that makes more sense. I will get the platform and the net. Do you think two of each will be an overkill for a 13ft. Reason being I figure the cargo in the back and the dogs on the other platform on the front.
                  Wind,

                  The answer to your question completely depends on what you're doing. If you're running an oarsman and a passenger, you can put gear in the back and front, but you'll probably want a seat up front for your passenger. You could also run it as a gear boat with only an oarsman. In that case you'll want platforms and nets at both ends.



                  There may be situations where you only need one net and one platform, but if you're doing multi-day expedition trips in Alaska, you'll probably need one at each end.

                  As to seating, your passenger could sit on the front thwart as Dan suggested, but I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. There's a lot of back strain associated with not having a proper seat. Naturally if you're just doing day trips or are paddle rafting, you could run with the thwarts, because on short trips space isn't usually an issue.

                  I see some guys running without nets over their gear, but this makes me a bit nervous. There are many ways for things to go wrong on a river, and many tales of woe coming from folks who wished they had netted their loads. I do it on all my guided float hunts, and even on weekend trips on the upper Kenai. It's just a good habit to have.

                  By the way, the platforms come in two sizes; large and small. Measure the inside length and width of the end of your raft to determine the proper one for your boat.

                  Hope it helps!

                  -Mike
                  Michael Strahan
                  Site Owner
                  Alaska Hunt Consultant
                  1 (907) 229-4501

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by goeaux View Post

                    And Dan as you should well know a Siberian tiger would not put a hole in your SOTAR!!
                    cheers- Goo

                    Good to hear from you man

                    I have no doubt the Sotar you sold me will last a long, long, time.

                    Incredible material they use to make them.


                    Below is a pic you had sent me last year when I was deciding what raft to buy. Glad I got the Sotar.

                    Thanks for hooking me up!






                    .
                    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=Michael Strahan;476968] I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. ]

                      Thanks Guys, I ordered one platform and one net, that should be good enough until I learn what I am doing and actually have the need for more gear.


                      Mike, I am curious to know what you use for seats for your passengers if your not using the thwarts. Do you have extra seats on the frame or do use something else.

                      Thanks,
                      Don

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Seating options on round boats

                        [QUOTE=windswept;477015]
                        Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                        I prefer to run my boats without the thwarts. They take up a lot of room in the boat, that I can use to stow gear. Also, I prefer a back-rest on my passenger seats. ]

                        Thanks Guys, I ordered one platform and one net, that should be good enough until I learn what I am doing and actually have the need for more gear.


                        Mike, I am curious to know what you use for seats for your passengers if your not using the thwarts. Do you have extra seats on the frame or do use something else.

                        Thanks,
                        Don
                        Don,

                        It all depends on the frame you're running. If you're using the NRS frames, it's pretty easy. All you need is one more crossbar in the front, and you can mount a seat plate directly on that. NRS makes a frame with an inverted foot bar for a seat bar, but this puts the seat up pretty high, and I'd be worried about knocking my passenger off with a sweeper. Also it might be harder to read the river with that person sitting up higher like that.

                        Here's a photo of a little NRS Otter we took along on a drop camp moose hunt. We just used it to zip across the river and such, but you can see the passenger seat up front. That system works well for me, anyway.



                        For seats, I prefer the Fish-On seats by Tempress. They clip on and off, and swivel 360º. You can even get pads for them if you like.

                        Hope it helps!

                        -Mike
                        Michael Strahan
                        Site Owner
                        Alaska Hunt Consultant
                        1 (907) 229-4501

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No big fan of the cargo net!

                          This may be a bit too late to help Windswept any, but I'm not a big fan of the cargo net most people seem to use in AK. I say that after watching $1000+ of camp chairs, a screen room, rod tubes, tackle boxes, etc, etc take a swim in Lake Creek last year after my brother got his 14' round raft hung up in a sweeper and dumped it. Everything was under a net and secured with probably 5 or 6 cam straps, but the current can exert an incredible amount of force on the raft if the net gets caught in something (and those nets get caught in everything!).

                          I've been looking for a better system ever since that painful lesson. I don't know anything about these guys at Clavey, but I like the way they load their raft in this picture:

                          http://www.clavey.com/index.php?cPath=1_11

                          Medium to large dry bags secured directly with cam straps to the d-rings. They also sell drop bags that secure gear beneath two frame cross-members if you don't want to deal with the hassle of hard-sided rocket boxes or dry boxes on your flyout adventures. I think I'm going to give it a try before hitting the water again this summer.

                          Rob

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                          • #14
                            Straps

                            nr4,
                            I do not use nets.
                            I do run a strap through every cargo bag, somewhere, so that I can strap everything down to a D-ring. Them cargo nets do grab everyting, don't they. They are like those "jumping castus" in New Mexico that seem to stick you even from several inches away.
                            Dennis
                            Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                            …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                            (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for all the help, I will also secure all my bags to the D rings. The net will come in handy when transporting game.

                              Comment

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