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Is there danger tying self to raft ????

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  • riverboater
    replied
    1. I would never, ever, tie myself into a boat, you never know what situation will arise, even on a lake, way too many things could go wrong.

    2. Learn how to swim, period, if your going to be on the water much at all. You do not have to be a great swimmer, but learn how to get yourself out of trouble.

    Leave a comment:


  • H20girl
    replied
    I have tried rafting...with NO rope !

    Hi everybody !
    Gosh, I was surprised to see people still reading this thread, and still giving such good advice ! I did buy a little raft last year off Craigslist. It is a Achilles with a wooden floor and transom. My good friend Andrew went with me on my first dip in the water to show me the way to handle her. Shes small and handles nicely in the lake. I found I did not like rowing backwards, so I got a nice red oak board and padded it with carpet and put across to sit on. I spent several hours with a friend pa ddling around Sunshine Lake trying to get some photos of the loons. I know this is not a boat I would ever take out on moving rivers, but it is perfect to just putt putt around lakes with. Andrew suggested I take my PFD to the pool next week and try it out in the water to see how it feels in case I ever do go overboard....and I will try it out that way...even if I look rather odd to people there ! I am so excited for the snow to melt so I can puff her up and get her ready to put in back of the truck on the first warm day to come along....I am so excited to get out and enjoy the water this year.
    And....no...no ropes for this girl....just a good PFD ! Enjoy the sunshine, and thanks again for the good ideas on being safe on the water.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6XLeech
    replied
    With experience, latitude...

    Excellent point, WhiteFish. Friends with much, much more rafting experience - remote excursions, 22-day trips, Gulkana Canyon(loaded raft), whitewater, Six Mile, Talkeetna Canyon - they tell me things that perhaps I will never do. Things they did when they were single, had more time, years of experiences. I may never "catch up" to their accumulated expertise, but learning to appreciate the dangers along the way is educational nonetheless - to see the hazard in some situations and know they aren't for me.

    Rivers or trips can be unpredictable. A good call for a seasoned river rat isn't necessarily a smart choice for newbies. Veterans, who'll admit they've learned from mistakes or other situations-gone-bad, usually still made good informed choices along the way; their skill/experience/fitness at the time was a factor in their survival. In any case they're wiser now because of it and share their lessons. (Check out Jeff Varvil's, "I Never Saw it Coming" at http://outdoorsdirectory.com/magazin...-it-coming.htm). One of AOD/OSA's strengths is the "campfire" where outdoorsfolk from all levels can join in, including total newbies who pose their questions and hear ... wisdom actually (OK, not always!); good advice from years of accumulated lessons-learned... straight from seasoned veterans. That's why threads like this one offer so much.

    What you, or anyone else, do with your raft in your situation is always going to be your decision. For you, it's making another call that makes another trip work/succeed. What message I take away from your decision; whether I interpret it as license to do it too or warning/recognition that I'm not nearly at that level yet, is my decision. Veterans on these forums are pretty good I think at warning newbies of the risks "out there". I think your point is a good one, that with experience comes latitude.

    That's growth: making informed choices. H2Ogirl has some good information here - and will make her own call. She may also learn to swim, and/or buy a drysuit. Maybe she'll be teaching pool sessions for KCK one day - it could happen.

    Leave a comment:


  • WhiteFish
    replied
    I have been tempted to loop a bow or stern rope around me while dragging my raft through fast water shallows as the thought of the raft getting away from me and continuing down river is sobering. Anyone who was lumbered through a few inches of rapidly moving water with a heavily loaded raft knows how difficult and challenging a situation like this is. I always wear a life jacket and when I'm in fast-water drag situation I have one of the raft ropes securely in a hand in case I stumble or just lose my grip on the raft while manhandling it. I have been in a few situations where, if I was to lose control of the raft I'd have to make a immediate decision whether to hang-on and drag or let the raft go. Thankfully that has never happened, and I always pack a 150 foot Z-Drag kit (even though I hate the Z-Drag's 16 lbs of weight) on every raft excursion in an attempt to minimize having to make a "get-drug" event. Situations vary immensely, and I, like most everyone else try to factor in all of the considerations and make a wise, best effort. Losing a raft in current or wind is a significant, possibly deadly situation as others have pointed out here. I don't remember the previous thread on this subject, so I'll find it and review it.

    WhiteFish

    Leave a comment:


  • power drifter
    replied
    She is a friend and I just emailed her to let her know her old thread is back.
    She came here last year to ask everyone, as I was telling her she was not to tie herself in. It is a good question for those that are new and sure that there will be new people to learn again hopefully by this old post coming up again.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlaskaTrueAdventure
    replied
    Lose the pool toy...

    scott rn,
    Get the real boat because you love your kid.
    One of todays previous posters sells fantastic and reliable 14 foot self bailing rafts of the highest quality and reputation.
    And floating/rafting will be fun, it will remain a fun activity for both of you in a reliable, quality raft.
    And congrats for consistently wearing those PFDs.

    Note that the original forum member who initiated the thread, H2Ogirl, has not posted since May 2009.
    Man, shes missing out on true gems of information!

    Leave a comment:


  • scott_rn
    replied
    Originally posted by H20girl View Post
    Can anyone out there tell my why I would NOT want to do this, when the boat would help me get to shore better than just me dog paddling.
    Will the boat really help you get to shore better. I know of an older gentleman who tragically died after a canoe swamped and he tried to swim to shore without a pfd, instead of staying with the canoe. (Wearing a pfd) I think you could get yourself out of the water quicker and safer without the drag of a raft, even with limited swimming ability.

    Leave a comment:


  • scott_rn
    replied
    Hijak

    I took my 5 year old fishing on some of the valley lakes last fall in a $40 sevlor big5 special. One day we sprung a little air leak in the raft and had to pull out to put some air in it. The kid started wimpering when I told him we had to put some more air in the raft so we wouldn't sink. I asked him what was wrong and he said "Dad, I want to live"

    We had our pfd's. We weren't more than 100 feet from shore, ever. I had even gone for a dip via a rope swing in that lake earlier that week. We even still had plenty of air to keep us afloat, it just needed some air to allow us to row a little better. No real danger, just a funny reaction from a funny kid Hopefully we'll be fishing out of a 14' self bailer this summer. Gotta work a bunch of overtime first.

    Leave a comment:


  • 6XLeech
    replied
    "In the scenario here; quiet lakes..."

    Originally posted by H20girl View Post
    ...on quiet lakes...
    No argument from me about rope and current. I think this is part of why some rafters keep knives on their PFDs. No, I understood the OP... yep, quiet lakes.

    Well put, goeaux. Current... and rope can be bad.
    Even in river rescues using throw ropes c-a-n cause trouble. Victims being pulled to safety by throw-rope (as I understand it) do best with their head down, chin tucked in - back to the shore while being pulled in.

    Dennis, just winter I guess. There are many fine educational posts among some older threads. My brother surfs and while rereading this thread, you know, the leash parallel popped up. I think H2Ogirl was thinking through ways to keep doing something she'd enjoyed elsewhere - safely. The leash seems a good idea - but so does all the caution about not applying the idea to moving water. Goeaux said it best, "...do not tie yourself to anything in moving water - you will go under if it hangs up!!" No one needs more ways to hang up in rivers here. There's trees in them streams!

    BTW, there's a survival kit thread (http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=19414) that goes back to Sept, 2007. It's a good one.

    Leave a comment:


  • goeaux
    replied
    For what it is worth-- do not tie yourself to anything in moving water - you will go under if it hangs up!! A river is not a lake -- hello???

    Leave a comment:


  • Benjy
    replied
    My buddy pulled into a boat launch and found 2 people wet and cold. Their raft was about 50 yards downstream lodged against some debris. They had tried to launch in some fast water, in a spot where we do it all the time, they just had no idea what they were doing. My buddy decides to help them get their raft out which isn't even a big deal, he wades out there and pries it off, flips it over. Inside the raft- their two dead dogs which had been tied there for some dumb reason. Personally, I would never tie any living thing to any boat.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlaskaTrueAdventure
    replied
    Leashes

    6XLeech,

    ...re-addressing an older thread...
    ...with logical, common sence information, backed up by the now common practice surfer leash concept....
    ...really makes good sence for the original forum member who posted and asked her question concerning leashing herself to her raft on calm-water ponds or lakes.


    Question for 6XLeech...concerning this LEASH thread...what initiated your interest, your re-addressing a thread that began and then ended almost a full year ago?
    Interesting...

    Dennis

    Leave a comment:


  • 6XLeech
    replied
    Quiet water..can't swim...how far is good...

    Originally posted by H20girl View Post
    ... spend time alone on quiet lakes with my dog. I can't swim and will wear a PFD. It has always been my habit when out on a lake alone to use a light dog leash tied to the boat and slipped around my wrist. My thinking is if I do fall overboard, the raft won't drift away from me. I can use the raft to get to shore...
    In the scenario here; quiet lakes, can't swim, water cold, having a light leash could be good. Why? Even a gentle breeze can swim your raft away faster than you can swim. The raft is: 1). extra flotation, 2). expensive.

    Surfers wear leashes to stay close to their boards for similar reasons. Many surf zones take surfers into rip currents or near rocks/coral where the extra flotation of a board can be lifesaving. Plus they're spendy.

    Not arguing against the good suggestions above (learn to swim, drysuit, special hazards of moving water, classes with KCK), but given the setting you described, maybe adding a ten dollar leash keeps your extra flotation from getting away from you. In that setting, I can't think of any negatives that would keep me from wearing one. The likely benefit would be magnified if you practice water re-entry, another excellent reason to get involved with KCK - they will insist you practice. Years ago, no one wore board leashes while surfing. Now, few go without them. Too many good reasons to have them. Too few reasons not to.

    Leave a comment:


  • HunterTom
    replied
    Raft and Whittier

    H20:

    I'll be taking a raft out of Whittier, but not in the sense I think you are talking about. We'll be taking a water taxi out ~70 miles then we'll use the raft and a 6 horse outboard to putt around the coves, bays, and fjords that we want to explore. We're going to spend a whole week out there fishing, hunting, and exploring. We will not be heading out in to any sort of open water, and I would highly recommend you don't either if you end up doing a trip in the Sound. Like Whitepalm said, it can change real quick, and if you encounter engine troubles the oars are going to be useless in the wind and tides. Staying close to shore shouldn't be a problem in good weather, but just study the area you'll be in and understand the limitations of your setup.

    Enjoy it!

    HT

    Leave a comment:


  • whitepalm
    replied
    Lots of folks have taken zodiac style boats out of Whittier. Sometimes they only do it once while others have learned how to get out there pretty far. Not without risking a lot prepared or otherwise. The sound can get very ugly and dangerous, take it slow. Safety equipment, Dry suits and the knowledge to use it all mandatory. I would suggest spending more time on smaller water before biting off anything too big. Using common sense will ensure you come home every time. Good luck and have fun.

    Leave a comment:

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