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  • Dog on board?

    For those of you with dogs that you take with you on your fishing/cruising trips, how do you do it? Do you make multiple trips per day to shore to let the dog go, or do you have some sort of setup to let the dog go on the boat? If so, what kind of setup? Any other considerations for boating with a dog?

    Funny thing, the word "dog" is not mentioned anywhere on this entire forum... You'd think as a minimum it would have been mentioned in the hunting forums. Oh well, now it is!

    Thanks!

  • #2
    I always take my dog with me. I just run rivers though, and I'm usually going somewhere. I don't know how the ocean guys do it.
    "If I could shoot a game bird and still not hurt it, the way I can take a trout on a fly and release it, I doubt if I would kill another one." George Bird Evans

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    • #3
      Great question, just got a puppy myself and plan on taking with me also. I'm planning on a couple shore trips but also hoping maybe I can train her to go on the ET so I can just hose it off.

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      • #4
        When I was with the ex she wouldn't go out with out the 80 pound lab. If we were in PWS we would just beach the boat every couple of hours and let the dog do his stuff. But he was also trained to use a piddle pad for the times we went to Seward. It worked out pretty well. Hope that helps a little.
        In 2011, the United States military finally starts to enforce the no sodomy rule...

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        • #5
          We do long cruises in a small boat, with an inflatable dinghy that stays rolled up when not in use, so we don't want to have to go to shore twice a day regardless of the weather.

          When our dog first went cruising, we happened to have on board a faux-grass green plastic doormat, intended for scrubbing the grit off our shoes after we had been ashore. When she needed to pee, she saw the “grass”, and proceeded to use it. Aha! We bought a plastic storage tub, used its lid turned upside down as a pan, and put the “pee pad” in it. A piece of rubbery non-skid under it keeps it from sliding around. After she uses it, we dump and rinse it overboard.

          She resists pooping in the cockpit, since she considers the boat home, not to be defiled. But after two days or so without shore leave, she eventually gives in. She doesn’t like this, but it works. Poop gets picked up with TP and put into the head. It’s pretty simple, but if you want your dog to cooperate in this area, it’s probably good to get started on it when the dog is young.

          We also improvised a water dish that works well – a squarish plastic food storage container with most of the lid cut out. It doesn’t spill or break easily.

          If your dog is accustomed to a particular kind of food, and it’s not one of the most common varieties, make sure you bring along enough (and any meds too) for the entire cruise.
          Richard Cook
          Dream Catcher (Nordic Tug 37)
          "Cruising in a Big Way"

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          • #6
            We run the rivers in the interior, our pooch, a Westie, has amazing holding abilities, our pit stops and hers coordinate well. She always wears her PFD and generally sleeps much of the day away.

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            • #7
              I run in Seward all time with both my Bernese MT Dogs. The generaly have been couped up for 8 hours when at work, so they have a regular system down. If I am out longer than that I will find a beach to go to. I also make sure they do thier business before we leave shore/dock
              sigpic2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

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              • #8
                On multiple day trips we seem to spend more time on the islands than on the water, so it hasn't been a problem. I figure if he gets to shore morning, mid day and in the evening he's all right.

                The only problem is he seems to think the bunk in the pilothouse is his.

                Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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                • #9
                  I take my dog everywhere.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    PWS w/ours

                    Our dog (a 120 lb. lab) goes everywhere w/us. When in PWS we simply load her into the inflatable and run her to shore. Usually first thing in the morning and again before bed. Often we make more trips to shore that just two for her, so she gets plenty of oppurtnities almost every day.
                    Since she was a puppy, now 5 yrs old, this has been our routine. At Whittier all you have to do is tell her to "go pee" and she knows what to do before leaving the dock.
                    Out in the Sound, she loves to swim so once on shore she can spend hours exploring and swimming while we sit in the cove cooking and relaxing in the evening.
                    BK
                    BK Marine Services 232-6399
                    Alaskas only Planar diesel heaters dealer, service, warranty, and installation.
                    Alaskas only Lonestar drum winch dealer, Whirlwind props, Stinger gearbox, and Alumatech airboats.
                    Www.bkmarineservices.com

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                    • #11
                      Good advice

                      Looking forward to taking the new pup, some pretty good advice here. I'll have to try the green carpet idea, it would be nice for her not to have to hold it if the fishing is good.

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                      • #12
                        I heard somewhere that some water type breeds of dogs instinctively 'go' when they get around water. The thought being -that they are about to go into the water, say after a duck or something. Lab owners might have heard more on this???
                        I always use a dog life vest for mine, two reasons; It has a handle on the back for lifting and ocean currents are serious no matter what you are. Frequent dinghy trips to shore, lunch, evening, etc...

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                        • #13
                          Myers

                          Good point on the life vest. We do the same for ours.
                          BK
                          BK Marine Services 232-6399
                          Alaskas only Planar diesel heaters dealer, service, warranty, and installation.
                          Alaskas only Lonestar drum winch dealer, Whirlwind props, Stinger gearbox, and Alumatech airboats.
                          Www.bkmarineservices.com

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                          • #14
                            I will add, I'm not the only one who's had a sick dog on his boat. I'm thinking he drank some bad water out of a puddle on one of the islands, and he kept me up all night. Nothing worse than a big sick dog on a small boat
                            Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

                            If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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                            • #15
                              I've taken dogs out of PWS for years, my 80 lb american bulldog cruised 2500 miles out of 3300 for the year two years ago ,we just go ashore in the morning and again at about 12 hr spans she is able to walk around and jump of the bow I let her run around as long as she wants then I load her ,a walk through wind shield would make it easier.Out of 6 different dogs the only trouble was them begging for table scraps and sneaking to many hering or shrimp, stick with dry kibble only ,the last thing you want to see is your dog doing the I gotta go dance 10 miles from the nearest island
                              Dave Pope

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