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  • Mounting a big buddy in a 220 hewes

    I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with different mounting set-ups with the Big buddy propane heater. I know it should work from anywhere, but what has worked best to keep the cabin cozy and well circulated/ ventilated. I finally found one here in Anchorage and now it's time to install and start doing some fishing. Anyone been out of Seawrd or Homer lately and which one provides a better shot at kings, halibut and rockfish? May even drop a shrimp pot or two while out. Thanks

    David

  • #2
    I have my buddy heater mounted up front on the step that goes to the walk through windshield. It's not permanently mounted but held on by 2 short bungee cords. It seams to do well heating the cabin up front to back.
    In 2011, the United States military finally starts to enforce the no sodomy rule...

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    • #3
      Me too

      I picked up one last weekend for my 20' SR. I think it will fit on the bow step Ken was talking about. I also picked up a 5 lb propane tank at Home Depot for $26. They left them outside and they got a little corroded (nothing big) so I got half off. As far as mounting, the Big Buddy has two screw latches on the back. I'm planning on putting in 2 stainless pan head screws to hang it on to.
      We never really grow up, we only learn
      how to act in public

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      • #4
        Well i was thinking the same...

        Well that it where i was thinking of mounting it.. The step up to the bow. I don't know where i would put a 5 lb tank at, so i will just run the two 1lb bottles, and have a couple of extras on board. I think this little guy will do just fine until the temps get up and during hunting trips... So no issues with the fumes or low oxygen on the boats? Keep the window cracked? Or just not worry about it? Thanka again...

        David

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        • #5
          I just run the little one pound bottles and keep a bunch of them on board. I'll be using them for the grill I bought. When I use it I just crack both front windows for cross flow. And the bottle has a low O2 shut off. In sept/oct when the temps were 40's it kept the chill off and kept the cabin fairly toasty.
          In 2011, the United States military finally starts to enforce the no sodomy rule...

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          • #6
            I mounted to step

            Mine is in a weldcraft but mounted to the step with screws and the key hole slots. My five pound bottle is outside of the cabin to avoid any leaks in enclosed space. I got the longer hose with regulator and filter at AIH.

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            • #7
              water vapor and co2

              be aware of ur water vopor (condensate on windows stinks for visibity ) and co2 is great for a headache and burning eyes . the buddy is a good choice for short term use not for overnight camping .a vented system would b better if u want to use it for extended periods .i have used the buddy for late musky trips in ontario in my soft top 18 ft but if u got a hewes try to swing the extra cash for a better system

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              • #8
                I've been using the Buddy for the last four years on my 22 hewes, I just set it on the front step and run a hose to the back for a 20 pound tank. I crack both side windows about a 1-1/2 inches and it seems to keep the moisture down, never had a problem with headaches.If you use the large tank make sure you get the inline filter for it.

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                • #9
                  Budddy

                  I've installed a buddy heater in my SeaRunner 220 and have been very happy with it. As per above I always open both side windows a crack to allow for ventalation and mositure escape. I have a tank installed behind the bulkhead door on the port with a wooden seat over it. It fits just perfect there-out of the way and the seat is nice when you are running and folks are on the outside with the door closed. I've also installed a heater cover so that when not being used the heater isn't getting water/dirt on it as folks go forward. I would also recommend installling a propane/CO2 detection system. I have a sensor in the cabin and another one in the tank enclosure. Fairly simple to do could prevent a serious accident. One final thing-when turning off the heater make sure you turn the valve on the tank off first-wait until the heater goes off and then turn the heater off. This allows gas in the line to be burned prior to shut off. Good luck.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks TriIron

                    Well thanks for the advice about the CO alarms. I think i am going to just stick wih the 1 lb bottles for now until i can find a way to house a tank under the floor or somewhere else out of the way. I don't think i will use it enough to need that large of a bottle, but the wife may change that for me. I tested the heater out last night and it kicks the heat up quite a few notches, so it should be just fine. How long do the lb bottles run if it's on high? I am figuring for atleast 8 hours but i may overconfident in the unit. Thanks

                    David

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                    • #11
                      longevity...

                      I think 8 hours is a bit optimistic...

                      I don't recall specifically but I think 4-6 hours is more like it... My suggestion is to take more than you need until you figure things out.

                      On my boat and when used in our tent HIGH will cook you out... (of course depending on ambient temps and wind) Typically we run it on high to knock off the chill and then switch it to low.

                      I guess it all depends on your wants/needs. If you are wanting a heater to keep the cabin a constant regulated warm temp the Mr Heaters may be a challenge for you... If you want something portable, versatile, relatively inexpensive, easy to operate and holds a great resale value - then Mr Heater is the ticket...

                      Co2 detection is a GREAT idea. WE have a 9volt C02 detector from my camper that we use in the tent and the boat... too many accidents to ignore the potential problem.
                      Last edited by WinMag; 04-14-2009, 19:52. Reason: additional info...

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                      • #12
                        Clarification

                        Sorry, being a bit nit-picky here, but this seems to be a confusing topic even when talking to people " in the trade", so thought I'd clear up some basic misconceptions.
                        First off-- the gas you are wanting to monitor is CO - carbon monoxide, not CO2- carbon dioxide. Carbon Dioxide can be a very good indicator of proper air quality ( since it is what we exhale ), and is always present to some extent as a byproduct of combusting any fossil fuel. However, accurate CO2 monitors & detectors are very expensive, and what is usually the culprit in deaths involving combustible gases such as propane and Nat. Gas ( methane ) is CO- carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas.
                        CO is an indicator of incomplete combustion-- not enough oxygen and nitrogen ( the air we breath is just under 79% notrogen, 21% oxygen ).
                        With sufficient oxygen for combustion, higher levels of CO2 are produced, as the free-flowing Carbon molocules ( C ) mate with the O2 molocules common in the air we breath, thus forming CO2. .
                        If the combustion process begins to be "starved" of Oxygen ( O2 ) , then these individual O2 molocules begin to break apart and bond with the free "C" molocules ( Carbon, from all carbon based fuels: gas, oil, wood, etc ) creating CO- carbon monoxide.
                        Strange as it may seem, we actually would rather things form up as CO2 instead of the CO, as far as a combustion process goes. Both are poisonous to humans, but CO tends to displace Oxygen in the blood stream, and thus silently but steadily slows brain function by cutting of/reducing oxygen supply to the brain, & other organs. Symtoms: headaches, blurred vision, poor memory function, etc.
                        Both issues of too much CO or CO2 are solved by better ventilation: diluting the concentrations, and introducing more "fresh" air to the immediate invironment.

                        Sorry for the rant, but it is a positive thing if more people understand what is really going on here: We need " excess air" for proper combustion- especially with these "vent-free" heaters such as a Mr. Buddy.
                        I use one without fear, but always maintain a certain level of caution, and keep fresh air mixing in either by an open window, or ventilating the area every now and then with a large volume "exchange".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ken210 View Post
                          I have my buddy heater mounted up front on the step that goes to the walk through windshield. It's not permanently mounted but held on by 2 short bungee cords. It seams to do well heating the cabin up front to back.
                          I do it the same way now going on 4 years
                          Living the Alaskan Dream
                          Gary Keller
                          Anchorage, AK

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Alaska Gray View Post
                            I do it the same way now going on 4 years
                            Where do you think I got that great idea?
                            In 2011, the United States military finally starts to enforce the no sodomy rule...

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                            • #15
                              Bill Nye

                              Originally posted by Mr Bill View Post
                              Sorry, being a bit nit-picky here, but this seems to be a confusing topic even when talking to people " in the trade", so thought I'd clear up some basic misconceptions.
                              First off-- the gas you are wanting to monitor is CO - carbon monoxide, not CO2- carbon dioxide. Carbon Dioxide can be a very good indicator of proper air quality ( since it is what we exhale ), and is always present to some extent as a byproduct of combusting any fossil fuel. However, accurate CO2 monitors & detectors are very expensive, and what is usually the culprit in deaths involving combustible gases such as propane and Nat. Gas ( methane ) is CO- carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas.
                              CO is an indicator of incomplete combustion-- not enough oxygen and nitrogen ( the air we breath is just under 79% notrogen, 21% oxygen ).
                              With sufficient oxygen for combustion, higher levels of CO2 are produced, as the free-flowing Carbon molocules ( C ) mate with the O2 molocules common in the air we breath, thus forming CO2. .
                              If the combustion process begins to be "starved" of Oxygen ( O2 ) , then these individual O2 molocules begin to break apart and bond with the free "C" molocules ( Carbon, from all carbon based fuels: gas, oil, wood, etc ) creating CO- carbon monoxide.
                              Strange as it may seem, we actually would rather things form up as CO2 instead of the CO, as far as a combustion process goes. Both are poisonous to humans, but CO tends to displace Oxygen in the blood stream, and thus silently but steadily slows brain function by cutting of/reducing oxygen supply to the brain, & other organs. Symtoms: headaches, blurred vision, poor memory function, etc.
                              Both issues of too much CO or CO2 are solved by better ventilation: diluting the concentrations, and introducing more "fresh" air to the immediate invironment.

                              Sorry for the rant, but it is a positive thing if more people understand what is really going on here: We need " excess air" for proper combustion- especially with these "vent-free" heaters such as a Mr. Buddy.
                              I use one without fear, but always maintain a certain level of caution, and keep fresh air mixing in either by an open window, or ventilating the area every now and then with a large volume "exchange".


                              Hardly a rant, just educating the masses. Nothing like bringing simple science to the forum on what could potentially be a deadly mistake or lack of judgment. When I was first reading through the responses, I was going what?
                              In the future, I will refer to you as Bill. As in Bill Nye the Science guy.
                              http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/site...hatisinair.swf

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