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Trty again - Ranger Tug in seas

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  • bhollis
    replied
    Originally posted by dirtface View Post
    with the 30 HP diesel they cruise at a whopping 12 mph. My brother-in-law has one. I tried to urge him to find a faster boat but he felt (at the time)that 12-13 mph would be sufficient. Differnent story today. If you think that is OK, go out with someone and make a run to Main Bay or Knight Island at a 12 mph cruise and decide if that is what you want.
    12 mph is pretty good for a displacement hull. Trading speed for fuel efficiency. Lots of people go everywhere--including around the world--at 8 or 10 kts in displacement hulls. Just depends on how much time you've got on hands.

    I've got a SeaSport 30 right now that cruises at 27 kts and gets around 1.5 mpg. When I retire in a few years I'll likely trade it in for a trawler-type (displacment) cruiser. And I'll take a hard look at the Ranger 25 and 29 tugs. Saw them at this year's Seattle boat show, and they are very nice.

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  • dirtface
    replied
    And slow too!

    with the 30 HP diesel they cruise at a whopping 12 mph. My brother-in-law has one. I tried to urge him to find a faster boat but he felt (at the time)that 12-13 mph would be sufficient. Differnent story today. If you think that is OK, go out with someone and make a run to Main Bay or Knight Island at a 12 mph cruise and decide if that is what you want.

    Leave a comment:


  • T.R. Bauer
    replied
    Originally posted by breausaw View Post
    You might ask your question here: http://www.c-brats.com/viewforum.php?f=46
    Or I can forward for you with a link-back
    Or even better yet, go to http://www.tugnuts.com as that is their own site!

    But, to directly respond to you question, they are meant for operation in protected waters.

    Leave a comment:


  • alaskapiranha
    replied
    A lot of info BUT still not all

    Stability is the resistance of a boat to forces that tend to induce heeling. These forces are usually static, like wind pressure on the sails, but storm conditions can bring dynamic forces (wind gusts and breaking waves) into play. Evaluating the overall stability of a blue water cruising boat requires the consideration of both static and dynamic stability issues. Four key factors are involved:
    oCenter of Gravity (known as ballast stability)
    oCenter of Buoyancy (form stability)
    oDisplacement (effects static and dynamic stability)
    oMoment of Inertia (dynamic stability)
    The first three factors determine static stability. This is usually shown as a plot of "Righting Arm" VS "Heel Angle", as is shown in Figure 1. The length of the righting arm is the horizontal distance between the buoyant force and the center of gravity. The "Restoring Moment", which represents stability, is simply the product of the righting arm and the displacement. The righting arm begins at zero, increases to a maximum at around 40 degrees of heel, and then decreases until it reaches zero again around 130 degrees. The heel angle where the righting arm goes back to zero is referred to as the "Angle of Positive Stability". When that angle is exceeded, the boat capsizes.
    CG controlled stability is fairly straightforward. A heavy boat, with a low center of gravity, will normally exhibit high stability. CB controlled stability (often called form stability) is determined by the center of buoyancy and its relationship to heel angle. In general, the wider the boat, the more form stability, but at extreme heel angles, freeboard, deck camber, and cabin dimensions all effect form stability.

    Dynamic stability controls how much a boat heels in response to a wind gust or impact of a strong wave. A stable cruising boat will resist these dynamic forces long enough for them to pass safely by. Heavy displacement helps dynamic stability, but the most important factor is the boat’s roll moment of inertia. The roll moment of inertia is calculated by multiplying the weight of each piece of the boat by the square of its distance from the center of gravity.

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  • breausaw
    replied
    You might ask your question here: http://www.c-brats.com/viewforum.php?f=46
    Or I can forward for you with a link-back

    Leave a comment:


  • potpuller
    started a topic Trty again - Ranger Tug in seas

    Trty again - Ranger Tug in seas

    Did not work right the first time, so here it goes again.... Does anyone have experience and or knowledge of how the Ranger C21 EC tug does in high seas and weather? Curious on how it handles and rides and limitations. Thanks

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