Can't We All Get Along???

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  • Hoyt
    replied
    I don't know about the rest of you, but I'm just plain ready to be on the river. Last year, on the river second week of May. Had to push huge chunks of ice out of the Chena lakes boat Landing, broke two oars, but it was worth it!!!!!!! 2.5 months and counting , hope gas prices stay down!

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  • 21'-Grayling
    replied
    Make yourself visable to the pb and dont stay in the shaded areas when you here them and your chances of an incident will decrease. When light is limmited it may be better to stay ashore. Just my opinion!

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  • fishin_ak
    replied
    Besides, if you slow down, the canoeists are gonna be checking out your women...LOL

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  • akriverrat
    replied
    i have to respectfully disagree with a couple statements you made.

    [quote=gulkana99701;440063]
    2. "to say that a canoe should move this or that way upon hear a pb is not sufficient. for one thing, one never knows the route the pb is taking. from what i have seen, if they are running an airboat or a jet they are just as likely to cut the inside of a turn as to be on the outside. props will, i suppose with few exceptions, be on the outside. its also at times difficult or impossible to tell how far away a pb is, and sometimes, what direction they are coming from—rivers with limited visibility and big oxbows and surrounding hills can fool anyone."

    the canoe being the smaller craft should try and calculate which path the power boat is going to take and if need be move so you are not in that path. if you are unsure about what path give him the deepest water you can. you should also be more visible along the shallow beach instead of tucked up against a cutbank.

    [quote=gulkana99701;440063]
    3. "also, please understand that for a canoeist the outside of a bend, with exceptions, is the place to be. as you all know, there are significant differences in current between the deep outside and shallow inside."

    if you are on the outside of a bend you are first taking the channel and second in the path of the largest wake posible by the powerboat. you are giving the powerboat no option but to stay on step by giving him the shallower water and that puts you in substatial wakes path.

    to each his own but no matter what boat i am running the boat that takes the most draft gets the channel. when i am in a canoe and i hear a power boat coming i have no problems moving to the inside and out of the channel. and just in case you are all wondering if im in a canoe there will be a motor hanging off the back.

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  • AKBassking
    replied
    Good Post

    If nothing else it has reminded us PB to share the river and pay attention!

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  • gulkana99701
    replied
    thanks everyone for the good replies.

    like i said in the original post, over 30 yrs of canoeing and only one incident that i can really complain about—pretty good commentary on the powerboat (pb) community of alaska.

    couple of notes:

    1. i agree that canoeists need to not be running side by side on narrow reaches of rivers where a pb may appear. that "sunday" canoeists on the chena in town do this something i have seen on a number of occasion. the canoeists need to be thoughtful about this. that said, pb also need to realize that reaches like the chena through town its not the place to be running "fast". again, i think most pb owner realize this and act accordingly.

    2. to say that a canoe should move this or that way upon hear a pb is not sufficient. for one thing, one never knows the route the pb is taking. from what i have seen, if they are running an airboat or a jet they are just as likely to cut the inside of a turn as to be on the outside. props will, i suppose with few exceptions, be on the outside. its also at times difficult or impossible to tell how far away a pb is, and sometimes, what direction they are coming from—rivers with limited visibility and big oxbows and surrounding hills can fool anyone.

    3. also, please understand that for a canoeist the outside of a bend, with exceptions, is the place to be. as you all know, there are significant differences in current between the deep outside and shallow inside.

    my approach upon hearing a pb is to move over, usually as far as safely possible to the outside, a sufficient distance to allow a pb with a prop to pass inside of me but still in deep enough water for their prop. if we are running abreast we also go into single file.

    as far passing speed goes. i have no problem with a pb going by when on the step—lower wake. but, some folks idle down. which is fine too, it gives a chance to say "hi" and exchange fishing reports (and, too, hopefully, check out the bikini babes lounging about the pb!).

    i think one thing that is useful is for the captains of both craft to make eye contact—its always nice to know that the object that is hurtling at you an ungodly velocity (to a canoe) and capable of decapitating you, actually SEES you!

    -g

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  • skip olsen
    replied
    Me I'm An Airboater Started With Flat Bottom And Then A Jet And Now An Airboat, Use To Run The Chena But Don't Any More Other Them From Pikes To The Tanana, But When I Had My Jet Boat I Use To Deal With The Floaters And The Canoers And I Had A Time Our Two With Them Blocking The Hole River Like They Owned It. I Paid Them Respect As Long As They Payed Me Repect. I'm Sorry I'm One Of Those Guys That Don't Like To Get Flipped Off. But In The Same Sentence If You Our Broke Down Our Need Help Our Your Boat Is Stuck On A Sand Bar I Will Be The First To Come Help You And Be More Then Happy To Do It. I Run Up Clear Creek In The Tanana Flats And Deal With People With Square Stern Canoes, I Come Up On Them They Pull Over And I Idle Buy Them And Get Up Away From Them, Than Get Back On Step, But I Have To Watch Out With My Airboat That I Don't Prop Wash People. There Are Some People Out There That Run Airboat That Forget Our Jsut Don't Care If They Prop Wash Some One And You Have People That Care And Others That Don't. But That Is In All Boating No Matter What Type You Run Our Use, The Way I Look At It Respect The Other Guy Like You Would Like To Be Respected.

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  • AKBassking
    replied
    As stated by everyone else, I will chop the throttle and float by or putt putt past the paddlers. We are responsible for our wake. However, I would also agree that if you hear someone coming get to the inside of the corner or beach. Riding on the outside of a turn when you know there are jet boats in the river is foolish and dangerous. There have been times that if I had come off of step, I would have grounded my boat and my jet would have been trashed, especially going down stream.

    I have had run-ins with airboaters too. Most are just like you and me and take responsibility for for their boats, but there are a few who are reckless. Just look at what happened on the Deshka a few years ago. If the driver has to wear ear protection well then.......dang its just common sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jimw
    replied
    Going up stream depending on where I am at the time and if it is sage, i will chop the gas and hold until they go by. I think i have been put on quite a few snap shot and videos from the floaters clients. Down stream, chop the gas when i get close and go by. If they can handle that little bit of wake they have no business being out there. Sorry my $0.02

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  • akshrop
    replied
    Idling is rarely possible in the rivers I routinely run if going downstream. As pointed out, jets don’t steer at low or idle speeds. Going up stream is rarely (unless blind turn, sweeper, ect) an issue when passing. I will shut down and hold position; letting the floater pass by. But going down stream and over taking a floater is the tricky part, at least in my mind. At an idle it will take a long time (if at all) to pass a floater and, during that time, I can’t steer.

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  • twodux
    replied
    just remember

    Just remember, you are responsible for your wake and any damage it does. Yes you do make more of a wake if you slow down to a point. But idling you don't make a wake. Some times that's what you have to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Garyak
    replied
    I saw an led combo nav/stern set up in one module on a 4ft. mast...green/red facing forward with white on top for 360 vis. well above the water line. Yields about 100 hrs. light per set of batteries. Very light and portable...clamps to seat or gunnels. Will probably get one for my one man cataraft. Not much bothers this little craft but if I ate a speeding jet because he didn't see me it would likely be my last meal.:eek:

    Leave a comment:


  • propgrinder
    replied
    fishin_ak, I agree. I can slow down and not leave as big a wake. And I agree that the floaters need to be responsible too. Coming around a bend and seeing the whole darned river full of floaters isn't a good deal.

    I once came upon two female canoists who were holding champagne glasses, pinkies out, as they drifted down the middle of the Chena in a bend. The had a nice spread set up in the middle of the canoe, no life jackets, all prim and proper, noses in the air, paddles stowed, etc. I ended up making a big wake trying to avoid them. And received laser glares for my troubles. There's all types on the river, isn't there?

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  • fishin_ak
    replied
    So the general consensus seems to be slow down even though I make a much smaller wake than wehn I'm on step. I can live with that. I do agree though that especially on the Chena, the paddlers need to have a little courtesy for us motorheads and as was already said, not spread out across the whole river. The same goes with the folks in inner tubes and whtever other else they might find that will float. I don't have a problem slowing down but weaving my way through a slolom course of paddlers makes a trip from Nordale to Pikes for dinner less than enjoyable. I wouldn't say "let's get along" just work together a little so we can all enjoy a day on the water. That's what it's all about anyway, having a good time.

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  • akriverrat
    replied
    never been on the gulkana but ive been on the little su in a canoe and its hairy at peak fishing times. i ran a gumman with a 4 horse and if i heard anyone coming i would either try and get in the shallows or tuck in behind a point depending on the situation. i was downstream and every person that went by did NOT slow down. i was prepared for every passing and it did not bother me but when im running my jetboat and come across a canoe if at all possible in tight situations i come off step. lots of people will claim that they cant but i have run the little su in a big inboard and you can come off step at about anywhere downstream but around the island. if the river is bigger and theres lots of room i give them as much room as possible and do an outside turn around them to push my wake towards the opposite bank of the paddlers. im sure i have pissed off a few paddlers but not intentionally and any paddler that plays on motor boat rivers must be aware and prepared for encounters and vise versa. being on the little su in a small craft it was handy to hear them coming. ive also been on jim creek in a canoe and all airboats i came across politley came off step untl we got past each other.theres was an airboater at the mouth of jim creek that pulled over in the channel and i attempted to go around and got stuck in my sportjon. im sure he didnt know i was there behind him and he had every right to park where he did but what amazed me was he sat and watched me and my three kids push and pull on my boat for at least and hour without even thinking of lending a hand. finally three canoeists came paddling down and got me unstuck .

    Leave a comment:

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