Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggestions on a Kenai river boat

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Suggestions on a Kenai river boat

    We are looking at getting a boat to run on the Kenai river. In my head I was thinking of a Hewescraft river runner type boat - one that you steer from a helm, as opposed to tiller style. Did some fishing last week with a guy that as 21' flat bottom boat (lowe I think, like a jonboat), with a tiller 50 hp. He said he liked having the tiller because steering columns sometimes fail, and he likes the flat bottom for getting to shallow water.

    So my question is what are the pros/cons of each? Are there really a lot of areas on the river that you can't get to unless you have a flat bottom? I would do likely 95% + in the lower river, between Kenai dock and Soldotna area. Do V hulls really become problematic in there? I'm not so worried about steering failures, I know those are rare and know how to do repairs on there. This would be a family boat so not a lot super fast running up and down river. Really just a leisure boat to get up and down to some fishing areas.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts on this.
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

  • #2
    My suggestion if it's worth anything to you, look at what the professionals are using and ask them why. I don't run the Kenai personally, however I have been out on lots of charters fishing for kings in the lower river. Most guides I have seen use a version of a wide flat sled type boat. Along the lines of a Willeys or SeaArc. Tiller control has a lot of advantages over remote steering control while fishing. Basically with a tiller you have almost instant throttle and direction control of the boat. It makes it a lot easier to push the boat around and keep in the prime fishing channel when bouncing or back trolling. And you aren't limiting your fishing area to only the aft deck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you, that's very helpful. I did chat with the guide we were out with last week and he indicated the same thing - immediate control on a tiller handle. A friend of mine has one for sale I am going to go check out tonight. It's a jon boat with a 30 hp four stroke .
      Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

      Comment


      • #4
        Most of the guides run willys or that style because of the king fishing. Not sure if you are going to be doing that much or other uses for the boat. I have sled style for the river but as we have and started to spend more time on lakes, less time king fishing only flossing or late season with 2-4 guys, I have now started to look for a helm style with windshield but not totally sold yet.

        Comment


        • #5
          Nothing wrong with an 18' Lund with a 35 horse. Especially for silvers in the fall.
          Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

          Comment


          • #6
            I have a sled (20x8) with 6 degree hull and rear console... wouldn't have it any other way for versatility.
            Attached Files
            sigpic

            Heavy Hitter Fishing
            https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

            Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff

            Comment


            • #7
              If you're not hauling 6 fat guys around like the guides do, you likely don't need an 8' wide flat bottom boat.
              Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

              Comment


              • #8
                Why not just get yourself a wave runner?

                No, just kidding, but all kidding aside I've seen all sorts of boats from zodiacs, inflatables, to giant 20 ocean boats dipping on the Kenai. It doesn't require anything special. I personally use a 16 foot Lowe with a 20 hp Tohatsu.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                • #9
                  Take a look at the regulations, the maximum length is 20 feet with a 50 HP motor, max width is 84" The 6 degree hull is great, they don't tip as much when everyone get on one side to see the fish. There are some of the old guide boats that have had to cut off the bow to make the 20 foot length.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I believe it has to be under 21 foot and the max width is 106”

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've seen guys on the Kenai in a canoe with an outboard. Only 2 in the canoe. Not 6 fat guys and the guide.
                      Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Also if dipnetting is one of your uses your planning for it’s really nice to have seats that you can pull out to have a nice open bow area.

                        Comment

                        Footer Adsense

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X