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2 strokes on the Kenai...???

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  • 2 strokes on the Kenai...???

    I haven't kept up.....I know that for a long time they used to allow 2 strokes on the Kenai after a certain date. Do they still, or have they outlawed them altogether these days?

    Thanks.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  • #2
    Pretty much outlawed. If you are going to fish you need to get a 4 stroke or emissions certified 2 stroke. I think that there are some exceptions though like you mention.

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    • #3
      I met with the folks with the Kenai Watershed Forum some time ago and was told that the entire Kenai River system, including all lakes that eventually feed the Kenai, are closed to 2-stroke motors.

      -Mike
      Michael Strahan
      Site Owner
      Alaska Hunt Consultant
      1 (907) 229-4501

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
        I met with the folks with the Kenai Watershed Forum some time ago and was told that the entire Kenai River system, including all lakes that eventually feed the Kenai, are closed to 2-stroke motors.

        -Mike
        What he said. Believe me, if there were a loophole, I would have found it.

        It seems to me, as I read the regs, that it doesn't mater anyway because it looks like the entire river system, except for the two lakes, a short, 1-mile stretch downstream of the boat ramp near Cooper Landing, and the area near the mouth that is open for dipnetting from a boat, is drift only. (Or it's drift only on the same day you fish, I can't recall which). Point being is that there is almost no place on the river to use ANY motor of ANY kind.

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        • #5
          sorry, nope. the entire lower river is open to 4 stroke or "etec" 2 strokes 50hp or less. the lakes are unrestricted hp wise but i too think there are no 2 stroke areas, but i may be wrong on that. but you can run motors on the lower and lakes.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
            What he said. Believe me, if there were a loophole, I would have found it.

            It seems to me, as I read the regs, that it doesn't mater anyway because it looks like the entire river system, except for the two lakes, a short, 1-mile stretch downstream of the boat ramp near Cooper Landing, and the area near the mouth that is open for dipnetting from a boat, is drift only. (Or it's drift only on the same day you fish, I can't recall which). Point being is that there is almost no place on the river to use ANY motor of ANY kind.
            Additional road-accessible lakes include Trail Lakes (Upper and Lower), Hidden Lake, Cooper Lake and a whole slew of smaller lakes, especially along the middle section. Also there are a number of hike-in lakes that are popular for fishing, where these restrictions apply. It's conceivable that someone could hike in with a little raft and a small 2-stroke outboard. The point is that anything that eventually drains into the Kenai River, with the exception of the tidewater area, is verboten for 2-stroke motors.

            You *might* be incorrect on the drift-only question. The middle and lower sections are commonly run with powerboats. Unless something recently changed?? I was there this summer and saw powerboats all over the place.

            -Mike
            Michael Strahan
            Site Owner
            Alaska Hunt Consultant
            1 (907) 229-4501

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            • #7
              Well I pretty much expected this on the actual Kenai river, but, and I don't mind saying, to find out now that I can't even run on Skilak anymore is pretty much pissing me off....!!! Da*n...!!!
              Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 4merguide View Post
                Well I pretty much expected this on the actual Kenai river, but, and I don't mind saying, to find out now that I can't even run on Skilak anymore is pretty much pissing me off....!!! Da*n...!!!
                It's not so bad if you realize the purpose behind it; to reduce hydrocarbon emissions in the most popular river in the state. In my conversations with the Kenai Watershed Forum folks, there has been a remarkable uptick in water quality since the changes. That's a good thing.

                Now we are fast approaching the other shoe dropping: the turbidity issue. Though not many want to stick their necks out and say so, I don't think anyone who really knows the Kenai River (especially the lower river) would question that the single greatest contributor to bank erosion / turbidity is the huge number of guides working the river with powerboats. Can-o-worms, I know, but that's it. We are likely going to be forced into figuring out a way to better control the number of guides on the river, or at least the total number of powerboats in a given day. Don't know how we're going to get there, but I believe that's where we are headed in the next few years.

                -Mike
                Michael Strahan
                Site Owner
                Alaska Hunt Consultant
                1 (907) 229-4501

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                  It's not so bad if you realize the purpose behind it; to reduce hydrocarbon emissions in the most popular river in the state. In my conversations with the Kenai Watershed Forum folks, there has been a remarkable uptick in water quality since the changes. That's a good thing.

                  Now we are fast approaching the other shoe dropping: the turbidity issue. Though not many want to stick their necks out and say so, I don't think anyone who really knows the Kenai River (especially the lower river) would question that the single greatest contributor to bank erosion / turbidity is the huge number of guides working the river with powerboats. Can-o-worms, I know, but that's it. We are likely going to be forced into figuring out a way to better control the number of guides on the river, or at least the total number of powerboats in a given day. Don't know how we're going to get there, but I believe that's where we are headed in the next few years.

                  -Mike
                  I understand the purpose behind it on the river itself but, with very low traffic on a big lake like Skilak say about now until freeze up, I really can't see how pollution from a few 2 strokes on the lake itself would be a major factor to shut them down completely......
                  Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I went to a meeeting or two when the 4 stroke rule was being debated prior to implementation.
                    People had all kinds of excuses from buried fuel tanks to industrial pollution. Very few thought the 2 stroke outboards put out that much pollution.
                    As Mike has stated they did indeed find that switching to 4 strokes or 2 stroke DFI engines did have a significant improvement in hydrocarbon levels in the Kenai river.
                    So while one may think their one little outboard doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things it actually does.
                    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                      Additional road-accessible lakes include Trail Lakes (Upper and Lower), Hidden Lake, Cooper Lake and a whole slew of smaller lakes, especially along the middle section. Also there are a number of hike-in lakes that are popular for fishing, where these restrictions apply. It's conceivable that someone could hike in with a little raft and a small 2-stroke outboard. The point is that anything that eventually drains into the Kenai River, with the exception of the tidewater area, is verboten for 2-stroke motors.

                      You *might* be incorrect on the drift-only question. The middle and lower sections are commonly run with powerboats. Unless something recently changed?? I was there this summer and saw powerboats all over the place.

                      -Mike
                      News to me! I've seen plenty of people in the last year use 2-strokes on Hidden and on Cooper. Additionally, I seriously doubt that any 2-stroke usage on those lakes would have any impact on the Kenai since they have a long drainage to get there. If true, this sounds gestapo-ish.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
                        I went to a meeeting or two when the 4 stroke rule was being debated prior to implementation.
                        People had all kinds of excuses from buried fuel tanks to industrial pollution. Very few thought the 2 stroke outboards put out that much pollution.
                        As Mike has stated they did indeed find that switching to 4 strokes or 2 stroke DFI engines did have a significant improvement in hydrocarbon levels in the Kenai river.
                        So while one may think their one little outboard doesn't really matter in the grand scheme of things it actually does.
                        Yep. It was painful for me too. The only outboard I own is a little 8-horse 2-stroke. I can no longer use it to shuttle from the Upper Kenai / Skilak Lake confluence to the ramp, so unless I want to row a few miles, I'm not floating the canyon for a while...

                        If it's good for the river, count me in!
                        Michael Strahan
                        Site Owner
                        Alaska Hunt Consultant
                        1 (907) 229-4501

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          A quote from my favorite philosopher, Yogi Berra,"No one goes there anymore because it's always crowded!" I am apretty much a late comer to this party on the Kenai, but it's the little thingsthat really make the difference. How many times have we thought "thislittle bit I do won't matter". Sadly, when thousands say that suddenly itis an issue. I have had the great fortune to fish some pristine streams whereno one had been there for years if not longer. The Kenai River is the victim ofit's own popularity. Sometimes the cure is distasteful or downright Gestapo-ish.I think the true sportsman society at large feels like Michael, "if it'sgood for the river!"
                          All paradise rests in the shadow of swords." ~K. Yates

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                          • #14
                            The day is coming where the Kenai will be drift boat only 7 days a week. I dont care to row anymore than anyone else. But it also say that I might actually fish the river again when that day comes. Been several years since I've fished that circus!

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                            • #15
                              I just switched from a 1995 150 mercury outboard to a 2011 200 DFI mercury just in the oil sheen I don't see in the water is amazing.
                              No stinky exhaust when it's cold. Lots more moving parts but much cleaner and plenty of power.
                              Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
                              Unknown author

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