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  • Trailering a Hudson Bay ...

    Next month, I go to Whitehorse to pick up my new Scott HB. I need to modify my canoe trailer, originally for a Osagian 17', to handle the HB's 21.5'. What I'm curious to hear from those with HB experience is about protecting the fiberglass hull from stones kicked up on the road. Have you had stone damage? Or, how do you protect the hull? I would expect that most of the threatening rock comes from the towing vehicle. Advice, suggestions?

  • #2
    Rick, I have hauled lots of canoes from whitehorse to the peninsula over the years on open trailers.
    I used carboard to protect the Fiberglass from road rocks.
    I juist wraped it and cut it to kinda fit the hull and the areas I thought would get some rock action and then wrapped with the shrink wrap you can get at costco in the 18 in or 12 inch sizes for commercial food use. the rolls cost like 18 bucks and will last a long long time and can be used for lots of other uses over the years.
    then over the shrink wrap I used packing tape to secure the shrink wrap .
    I never had any fall off in rain and wet roads, and no damage to my canoes.
    In fact,, One time I was bringing back 10 canoes from whitehorse and stopped in Tok to buy gas and get a hamburger, and while parked at the gas pump, I was approached by two locals and ended up selling two canoes right off the trailer in tok..
    They were impressed with how I had taken measure to protect them and they were in perfect condition when we removed the tape, wrap and cardboard..
    The other option is to borrow an enclosed trailer for the journey.
    and wrap your canoe in quilts and I used cheap inflatable pool toy mattresses on the floor and sides of the trailer ,,
    I hauled 9 last year from Calgary to Home on the kenai in the enclosed trailer with no damage ..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    • #3
      You will need a way of attaching bow to front of trailer, my HB had forward cleats that allowed me to rig a harness to tie it forward
      & also used a heavy duty ratchet strap to keep bow from bouncing on trailer. Keep the canoe tight to the trailer, you can tarp or
      pad it to protect it from rocks. But bouncing it on a trailer that does not fit boat will not do your new Scott any good.

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      • #4
        mud flaps on the truck is number one

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        • #5
          If your just getting a hull use a temporary rack in the back of the truck or a contractor style roof rack. Thats my plan for the haul road and beyond.
          BHA Member
          Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
          The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

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          • #6
            Frankly, I can't imagine putting a 250# HB on a rack on my pickup. I'm sure I'd do more damage getting it up and down than rocks on the road. I got tired of rack carrying my 19'er at 120# plus lifter .... I bought my canoe trailer so I could handle the canoe by myself, and it's worked well, so far. With the trailer, I can comfortably go places by myself. I think, at least for me, the trailer is my best solution, available for now. I know J. Klingel has made himself an appropriate flat bed for his HB. I don't have that option presently. I am replacing the tongue on my trailer with one heavier and 60" longer, for starters. New and additional bunks and carpeting. New winch. Full width mud flap on my little pickup. I intend to make additional provisions to well cradle the hull. And, generally toughen up the trailer for rough roads.

            Further, as long as I'm still using my beloved and still thriving 2003 15 horse 2 stroke Yamaha, and not a 166# Mudbuddy, the OB will ride in the truck.

            My trailer appears identical, or close to Rick P's.

            http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ott-Hudson-bay!!!!

            Alaskacanoe's cardboard padding with shrink wrap solution have set my mind to working. But, I want to figure out ... how to have a system that isn't too complicated, too time consuming, but simple and light. I'm wondering if a tarp would be sufficient. Thanks for the input, guys.

            How do you haul your rig, FamilyMan?

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            • #7
              The haul road is rougher than the drive back from whitehorse and with a roller or two in the right spot it is not at all hard to rack the HB. Cardboard or carpet reminants should work fine.

              However don't fool yourself on the damage a long haul on dirt roads can do! I have a popup trailer that looks like it has been used for target practice for years......it made ONE trip up the haul road! Not a single light lens left on her! I was stunned by the amount of damage.
              BHA Member
              Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
              The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Rick P View Post
                The haul road is rougher than the drive back from whitehorse and with a roller or two in the right spot it is not at all hard to rack the HB. Cardboard or carpet reminants should work fine.

                However don't fool yourself on the damage a long haul on dirt roads can do! I have a popup trailer that looks like it has been used for target practice for years......it made ONE trip up the haul road! Not a single light lens left on her! I was stunned by the amount of damage.
                Rick P,
                Although your proposition sounds crazy, it would probably work with your big truck. You aint kidding about that Road either. Last season I did two trips across many back roads. One trip to Mcarthy, and one trip to Eagle. I can't guess how much late spring back roads that would add to but holy sht!......what a rough ride. I run an Old Man Emu suspension just for this reason, and always car top my canoes. This is a big reason I like to stick with a smaller and sportier square stern canoes......because of those roads that I don't want to pull a trailer on. I saw park service trucks off the road, one guy died on the road to Eagle last year....so throwing a pig of a canoe up top wouldn't be a bad proposition. BUT.......there were many road rats (motor homes and subarus who do nothing but take pictures along an/or only hang on the road system) along my travels too. Hauling a trailer would certainly require a very slow run, 15 mph at most.
                www.freightercanoes.com

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                • #9
                  Here's how I haul my Scott

                  Originally posted by Rick View Post
                  How do you haul your rig, FamilyMan?
                  I bought a 16' flatbed trailer (from a forum member here - Thanks, Erik! :topjob and then went to home depot and bought astroturf. Took my handy dandy staplegun and stapled the crap out of it down to the wooden flatbed.

                  I treat this as my boat trailer, backing it into the water just so - so that the hubs don't go underwater. Then I can slide the fully loaded Scott into the water one handed.

                  So I'm hangin' off the back of the trailer 3', and I use heavy duty car ratchet straps to affix the boat to the trailer; it stays solid even 100 miles out the Glenn where all those nasty frost heaves are. The bad news happens when I also bring an ATV and put it on the front of the trailer (side loading it; I cut the rails off one side to allow this) because this makes my Scott hang off the back about 7 feet. But the boats OK; its the tounge weight that kills me, but I still do it when I need both on one trip.

                  Here's a picture of me and my (then) 3 year old posing with this rig, in front of the glacier on the Glenn:

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                  • #10
                    Mainer you could buy yourself a couple of rolls of the silver insulation has the air inside that kids like to pop it is 4 x 25 feet long two layers would work 40-43 per roll call the packaging store and see if the clear stuff is cheaper. If you have it on a flat bed trailer a few funoodles work great to keep it off the bottom,

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                    • #11
                      FamilyMan ... I like your system, but would need a 22'+ trailer. Maybe I'll spot a fairly light-duty one. For now, I'll modify my canoe trailer, somehow. And think of some type of flatbed. All this careful treatment and concern is a far cry from my experience of a decade with my aluminum Grumman. But I'll adjust.

                      RickP ... I've spent a lot of time on the Haul Rd. but in March and April, never in no-snow season. But the one lesson I quickly learned was 10 ply tires, in excellent condition, make the trip more trouble free. Lesser tires even new ones fail. That road eats tires. One trip, rock ate my rear brake line. My Chevy HD 3/4 ton pickup hauling a large dog box, 26 dogs, 6 dog sleds, gear, and pulling an enclosed 20' tandem axle trailer - no brakes - with 3 snow machines, camp gear and other necessary equipment went over Atigun Pass from the north side,with only my front brakes, at 5 mph, in 4X4 low, with my guiding partner's big Ford stakebed 5' in front of my bumper. Needless to to say, it was a white knuckle trip down that grade, but no headlines. For 3 days thereafter, there were white caps in my coffee cup. Don't think I'd take my canoe trailer up there.

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                      • #12
                        rick,
                        RickP has been up there, that's how his pop-up got rocked up. I think he's envisioning a roller akin to the hully roller by yakima http://www.rackwarehouse.com/y4035.html (or a big solid roller, but the same concept).

                        Far as a rack, you could easy load that +/- 250lb freighter on a rack that sit in/on a pickup bed. Just think of a stick frame of 2x4's, or a lumber rack on a pickup. I think loading it would be a bear, even if with a roller. kind of like this (not my photo, just a photobucket search)

                        RickP, how you gonna flip it over? are you just going to drive with it right side up?
                        My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

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                        • #13
                          My response was an affirmative about the rock damage on the Haul Rd. And is only a cautionary tale based on my experience of more than 20 years guiding dog trips and hunting caribou on the North Slope. And I understand that RickP's been there before. And is well experienced. No slight intended or implied. My conclusion was that my little canoe trailer isn't Haul Rd industrial grade. My canoe use is primarily in the Interior.

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                          • #14
                            Gotcha. I don't think I'd take a canoe up the haul road myself.

                            What's your thought on throwing the canoe in question on top of a truck rack, somewhat like the photo?

                            I think this is what RickP has in mind:
                            http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...BongiALVle2FAw
                            Last edited by scott_rn; 04-09-2011, 05:59. Reason: add linky
                            My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

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                            • #15
                              Very similar Scott, I had thought of a roller lower at the rear that can be readujsted upwards and bridging over the cab but you have the idea. Other than the extreeme case of the haul road I wouldnt think of racking the HB, it will requier stripping the hull and I dont plan on doing it often! Guys 250 pounds is not that much weight, I saw three guys pick up a summit and turn it around yesterday without issue, thats a bit over 500! When working with anything heavy the secret is working with the wieght of the boat, rock, truck, big *** log whatever. Yes it will requier a major grunt to get to tailgate hieght but after that its push across rollers and pivit on the center point.

                              PS I do about 4 trips a year up the haul road both with and without snow, crazy road and I have seen some wack stuff up there! Had to back down atigun with a snow blow in hot pursuit once, 35 miles an hour backwards in near blizzard conditions on one of the steepest roads in north america..........fun! Secert to keeping your rig in one piece is easy, SLOW DOWN! If you follow the truckers rules, 25 or less when passing each other and stay way to the right, it's a much more enjoyable trip. As mentioned before heavy duty tires are a must! But thats all that will hold up on my big*** truck anyway.............wouldn't want to do the trip in a minivan.
                              BHA Member
                              Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
                              The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

                              Comment

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