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  • #31
    Building your own

    Building one yourself, and then using is something only a few people have the patience and skills to do.
    A nice warm Garage or work area big enough for winter time would be a very big priority.
    Do you have any pictures?
    It would be nice to see your canoes being built in stages.
    If you don't mind, and have a digital cameral I think you could really make alot of people very interested in your craft.
    Here is a link to Gil's book and website for his other outdoor equipment and guiding books.
    http://gilgilpatrick.com/strip-canoe.html
    Max
    Last edited by Alaskacanoe; 09-10-2006, 22:55. Reason: adding website link
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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    • #32
      In progress

      I am leaving this weekend for a caribou hunt but will try and post a few pictures when I get back. I am about 1/4 through with my 20 foot so you will be able to see the progress.

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      • #33
        Gruman Frighter

        I use a 19' Gruman Frighter with a lift and 9.9 mercury with a Rock hopper Guard for the prop.
        Alaska

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        • #34
          Canoe

          that canoe is the back bone for canoe travel in Alaska ,I was saden when Grummen stoped making them, but then when the new CO. started making them I knew that we would be getting new people into useing them they are the best that I have found, the 9.9 you have should do the job just find putting you up most rivers in Alaska SID
          PS did you get the lift oft of Fairbanks ?

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          • #35
            Ally pack canoe !

            I got one of these 3 years ago for a canoe trip on one of the Noataks lower tributaries. I was absolutely amazed. Its made of Tarpulon. A lighter version of Hypalon that the Zodiac rafts are made of. I drug the heavily loaded canoe over rocks in the shallows, bounced it off boulders and canyon walls, and ran over gravel bars for 7 days. Amazing boat. This past August I took it on the Kugururok (another lower Noatak trib) on a 13 day trip. Incredible canoe for backcountry trips. I am taking it on a 70 mile flyfishing trip in Togiak this coming August for 11 days. My buddy who joined me on the last two trips, bought one himself for this past trip. We got the 16.5 foot models. They weigh less than 50 lbs and fit in a large backpack, can be checked as airline luggage, and carry 830 lbs. I know this is true because my wife and I weigh 520 lbs and took 360 lbs of gear on the 13 day trip. We went through some light class III water with no problems. Not by choice, it had rained for two days on us and the water was up. The 15 foot model weighs like 35 lbs and would be great for 2 people and perfect for 1 hauling meat. The 16.5 is my choice for canoe camping/fishing trips. The 18 ft model hold 900 lbs. They are made in Norway by Bergans and imported to U.S. via Cascade Crags in Washington state. I saw where Equinox Adventures in Anchorage has some for sale as well. I will attach a link to their page that gives lots of details on the canoe for anyone interested. If you fly out in the bush or want a canoe you can throw in the trunk of your car, this is the only way to go in my opinion. I will be buying another one soon as some friends are going to join me on the next trip and this give me the perfect excuse to buy one.
            http://www.equinoxexpeditions.com/boats.html
            The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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            • #36
              I am a Sportspal fan.

              I own a 13 foot square stern Sportspal and I love it. Very stable and easy to steer. When fishing, I can stand up in it without fear of capsizing. Excellent hunting and fishing canoe.
              A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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              • #37
                Ally canoe

                Now this looks like a great boat, and you have tested it on some great expeditions. The fact that you can pack it up and ship it on the airplane makes it really attractive.
                Sounds like the material is tough and it looks like it should paddle and respond well, as it looks to have a conventional canoe shape.
                For Alaska,, this may be one of the best ideas going, the take down canoes have advantages...

                When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

                Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Alaska Series Inflatable Boats View Post
                  ...I have a quiver of 9 canoes. In the quiver are 5 Clippers, 1 Sawyer, 1 Ally Collapsible and 2 Alaska Series Inflatable Canoes. . .
                  Jim,
                  I have never used an inflatable canoe, but it seems like a good idea for portability. However, I don't know anything about the durability of inflatables. Generally, canoes take a lot of beating on the rivers and trout streams I navigate. What kind of durability can I expect and how much maintenance will I generally need to do on an inflatable?
                  Thanks.
                  A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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                  • #39
                    Inflatable canoe durability

                    Originally posted by WinMag_300 View Post
                    Jim,
                    I have never used an inflatable canoe, but it seems like a good idea for portability. However, I don't know anything about the durability of inflatables. Generally, canoes take a lot of beating on the rivers and trout streams I navigate. What kind of durability can I expect and how much maintenance will I generally need to do on an inflatable?
                    Thanks.


                    WinMag


                    Back in High school, I remember an experiment we did with balloons in Mr. Clutter’s physics class. We took an ordinary balloon and blew it up softly with very little air pressure. We then took a needle and tried to puncture the balloons. We discovered that we could not puncture the balloons with the needles because it took more pressure to push the needle through the rubber then there was air pressure pushing from the inside of the balloon against the point of the needle. The low air pressure was absorbing the pressure of the point of the needle. Then we increased the air pressure inside the balloon little by little until we were able to pop the balloon with the needle. At that time Mr. Clutter was teaching us why they make auto tires out of rubber and air and how they absorb impact on the road.

                    I use the same Grizzly Hide® fabric in my Alaska Series Inflatable canoe as I use in all the Alaska Series Inflatable boats. The durability of the Grizzly Hide® fabric has proven to be very rugged. Just ask any one that owns one of my boats.

                    In general what makes inflatable boats so tough is the combination of the puncture strength of the fabric and the same physics principal as I leaned with the lightly inflated balloon.
                    Most inflatable boats inflate between 3 to 4 PSI of air pressure in the tubes. This low air pressure allows the fabric to absorb most impacts and often doesn’t even show a scuff. The weave of the polyester 1100 denier Decitex base cloth is very tight. It’s similar to the weave of a Cordora pack cloth but with less stretch. This gives the fabric puncture strength many times greater then the air pressure inside the tubes. So the boat tends to either absorb or bounce off most things they hit or rub against.

                    If you ever do puncture the fabric it is easy to repair in the field with the use of urethane tapes such as Tear-aid. http://www.tear-aid.com/ These Urethane tape products have made field repairs so much easier then the old glue and patches methods and they will last about 5-6 years. Urethane tape is pretty much peal and stick after you clean the affected area with an alcohol pad repairs don’t get much easier. .

                    Of course I also cover all repairs as part of the 5-year warrantee. So once you get your boat back to town bring it to me and I can do factory style repair that will last the life of the boat.

                    Over all you should get 15-30 years of useful life from your Alaska Series Inflatable boat depending on how you take care of it. .

                    If you need more specific information on the Alaska Series Canoes please ask.

                    Good boating
                    Jim King

                    Alaska Series Inflatable Boats, Commercial quality at Wholesale prices River Rafts, Cataraft, Inflatable Kayaks, Inflatable Canoes, Inflatable Sport Boats, Inflatable Jet Boats, Tenders and Dinghies. WWW.alaskaseries.com
                    (907) 248-2900

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                    • #40
                      Thanks, Jim

                      for the detailed explanation. I'll be in touch when I need one of those boats.
                      A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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                      • #41
                        Best Canoe

                        My primary use for canoe is for trapping. In our family we have 2 Golden Hawk Canoes. 1 was won at a Wisconsin Trappers Convention. We are very happy with the performance and stability they've given us over the years. These canoes are great no matter what activity you are using them for. www.goldenhawkcanoes.com

                        Originally posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
                        Aluminum, Birch Bark, Cedar, Roylex, Kevlar, Polyethylene, Poly link, RamX, FiberGlass, PVC, Hypalon,, and on and on..
                        We made some 35 years ago out of Canvas and redwood frames. stretched the Canvas on and painted it in an attempt to keep the water out. It worked wonderful... they were really light, and lasted at least 4 or 5 Boy Scout trips that I remember..
                        Anyway..
                        Most of you that have or have had canoes--may have a bias towards one material or anouther.
                        Anouther bias may be the design. Long and narrow, short and fat, lots of rocker, lots of tumbletome, There are so many designs and yet many of the oldest designs seem to still be favorites amoung the most avid Canoe nimrods.
                        What Canoe is the best all around canoe on the Market.?
                        Now remember we need to be able to portage this canoe, so weight comes into play. We are going to use it lakes, streams, rivers, etc.
                        Tell us what the perfect Alaska Canoe is to you.
                        The Canoe design below is over 100 years old.
                        Length: 16' 2"; Rocker: 2.5" bow, 2.5" stern; Beam: 33"; Center Depth: 14"; Weight: Kevlar, 42lbs, Fiberglass, 54 lbs; Price: $2,000; Website: www.esquif.com.



                        Champlain, Esquif
                        The Champlain is a beautiful touring canoe from Esquif that arrived in Canoe & Kayak office too late for reviewer John Radel to paddle it, but managing editor Robin Stanton took it down the Snohomish River a couple of times and found it a joy to paddle. It glides through the water effortlessly, the cane seats are comfortable, and it's no trouble at all to lift it on and off your car. The boat was originally designed in the early 1900s by the legendary Peterborough Canoe Company of Ontario and has been brought back to life in Kevlar or fiberglass by Esquif.

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                        • #42
                          We've got two Grummans here, a square stern and a double ender. Great boats. Used 'em on the Yukon, Nancy Lakes, Swan Lake/ Moose River route, no problems. I'd like to get into building strippers, maybe next winter's project.
                          "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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                          • #43
                            I was talking to a fellow tonight from northern Maine..
                            He is coming to Alaska this summer and wants a canoe for 5 nights and a trip into the canoe trails system here on the kenai.
                            he asked me what kind of canoes I have in the fleet?
                            I told him and he asked a few more questions that showed me he knew his canoes..
                            And so I asked him at that point ,, what canoe is your favorite?
                            Well... 30 minutes went by... and lots of good information was shared by this fellow.
                            He had spent a lifetime using canoes,, and enjoyed many of them,, and some he had no love for..
                            but in the end of his wonderful rant.. he said.... " I had very few days in a canoe that were anything other than just Wonderful"
                            He is in his early 70's now and I can imagine by our visit that he has had a full life doing many things of interest and injoyment, but his voice just lifted as he shared his life with canoes..
                            This summer when he comes to visit.. I Intend on breaking away from the campground here.. for the first night he heads out on his Alaska canoe adventure and tag along with a solo canoe,, just so I can spend some time with this old nimrod..
                            That is what makes my life full....
                            that is one of dreams I have been able to fulfill.. to be around like minded people that love life and the outdoors, and canoes..
                            When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

                            Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              It sounds like you have chosen the perfect life for yourself...one that gives you the chance to meet and spend time with those like minded folks and still make a living doing it...what a nice dream you have and being able to live it is all the better. Dream on.....
                              Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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                              • #45
                                Ode to The Tripper

                                I appreciate a light canoe. As I get older those light kevlar or the folding Pakboat are very fun to use. The 40-50 pounds is easy on a body conditioned by months behind a desk.

                                However, if I was forced to have one canoe it would be an Old Town Tripper or perhaps even the XL version. Only downside is they are heavy. If I have hit the weights that's ok...if not they can be a bugger on portage. On long portages they are a bugger anyway. With keel plates and an extra reinforcing thwart they are approaching 90 pounds in the regular version. The Royalex is very, very tough and can seem to survive any abuse, the combination of tracking and turning very good, excellent primary and secondary stability and capacity is superb. They are the pick-up truck of the Northern waters.

                                I have soloed the Tripper and leaned over Mason style it's pretty good. It will handle me and a moose with out feeling too overloaded. In Cliff Jacobsen's "Expedition Canoeing", the Tripper is mentioned as the choice by a lot of river guides. It has a great combination of features not the least of which is that on a remote river it will quite likely survive the worst abuses that would trash the lighter, sexier designs. That heavy Royalex hull will see you home.

                                Check out the depth and cargo capacity...a real hauler, though with 1500 pounds not sure that your freeboard would be adequate. I have had just over 1000 pounds in mine and had adequate freeboard to feel safe.

                                http://www.oldtowncanoe.com/canoes/e...ripper_xl.html

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