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Thread: Incidental Catch Rate for Rainbows & Dollies

  1. #1
    Member Tomcat's Avatar
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    Post Incidental Catch Rate for Rainbows & Dollies

    Despite combat fishing conditions for sockeye salmon on the Kenai and Russian rivers, I'm surprised that few rainbow trout and dolly varden appear to be included in the bycatch. With so many hooks in the water, it seems that a lot more non-targeted species would fall prey.

    What are your theories on why and/or how most trout and dollies are able to evade capture by salmon anglers?

    Do they prefer different stream habitat? Are they so focused on eggs and flesh that they generally aren't interested in striking salmon flies and lures? Are they simply smarter than reds and therefore more elusive? Or are these fish so vastly outnumbered by the reds that they aren't as susceptible to being flossed?

    Something to ponder with the big opener coming up this weekend...

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    Member Sierra Dragon's Avatar
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    No Idea why...

    last year on Little willow I hooked 2 rainbows trying to catch kings. I would have thought a #5 Vibrax would be a bit much for a 14" rainbow to handle but apperently not.

    my guess is that sockeyes hang out in different water than the bows and dollies.

  3. #3
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat View Post
    Despite combat fishing conditions for sockeye salmon on the Kenai and Russian rivers, I'm surprised that few rainbow trout and dolly varden appear to be included in the bycatch. With so many hooks in the water, it seems that a lot more non-targeted species would fall prey.

    What are your theories on why and/or how most trout and dollies are able to evade capture by salmon anglers?

    Do they prefer different stream habitat? Are they so focused on eggs and flesh that they generally aren't interested in striking salmon flies and lures? Are they simply smarter than reds and therefore more elusive? Or are these fish so vastly outnumbered by the reds that they aren't as susceptible to being flossed?

    Something to ponder with the big opener coming up this weekend...
    I'd say it's mostly a numbers game. That being said, on more than one occasion I've watched dollies and rainbows sit right in the same spot for an hour or more, while the salmon are constantly moving...could also be a factor

  4. #4
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    it's because of 2 reasons............IMO
    A) They camp right next to the people fishing in the water.
    B) They are smart enough to get out of the way, and or not interested in what people are throwing.

  5. #5
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I snagged 2 dollies on the Kenai while flipping for reds last year. To put it in perspective, 2 dollies in about 10,000 flips is a pretty low rate.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  6. #6
    Member AKFishinGirl's Avatar
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    I've caught two Dollies at the mouth of the Kenai while dipnetting. That surprised me, but apparently it isn't uncommon from what people have told me since then.
    ~ Kristie~
    The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope. ~John Buchan

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat View Post
    Despite combat fishing conditions for sockeye salmon on the Kenai and Russian rivers, I'm surprised that few rainbow trout and dolly varden appear to be included in the bycatch. With so many hooks in the water, it seems that a lot more non-targeted species would fall prey.
    Depends on where you fish.

    I know one spot where the trout regularly fall victim to the relentless rippers on a daily basis.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  8. #8

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    Swiftwater Doc? I catch dollies and rainbows while targeting reds there every single trip.

  9. #9

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    P.S dollies and rainbows are almost always where salmon are simply due to the fact they're waiting for the salmons eggs, carcasses thrown out by anglers, and eventually parts of spawned out fish. If you are using a red russian river fly, or anything similar to that or an egg sucking leach, flash fly etc. don't be suprised if it gets hammered fairly frequently.

  10. #10
    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    Last year I was flipping for reds at the Russian/Kenai confluence. It was like 0300 and pretty dark out. After fishing for an hour with no luck I finally hooked up. Felt like a nice fish, it gave a good fight and I just beached it into the sand. I was horrified to see it was a dandy of a bow. He it the fly and was hooked in the top the mouth deep. I did my best to unhook and revive him but I am sure he went belly up. I still feel crappy, though I suppose there isn't much I could do.

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