Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Serrated Blade vs Straight (as in Cutco) On Big Game

  1. #1

    Default Serrated Blade vs Straight (as in Cutco) On Big Game

    I recall reading on here about the popularity of Cutco knives; specifically the 5718 or 5719 models. Both of these models are available in the DD blade which is serrated, or conventional straight blades. My questions are these:

    Do you like the serrated blade? How does in perform at skinning and boning?

    Any drawbacks to serrations when butchering?

    What do you think of these particular knives for processing large animals like moose?

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I love them in the serrated edge for moose and other ungulates. I was less impresses with it on the one black bead I have done with it. The fat gummed up the serrations and made it much less effective. For bears I like the havalon piranta.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Nicks in a blade mean poor knife care and gramps would take it away
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  4. #4

    Default

    Don't know about game animal hair but my serrated CUTCO knife seems to load up with the fur of furbearers pretty easy. I'll find out how it works on bears soon enough though !
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

  5. #5
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    It's not a cutco, but I use the serrated victorianox for most everything. One knife does two black bears and then gets used as a bait knife. Handy little blades!

    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6

    Default

    Until they come up with a way to sharpen a serrated blade I'll stick with straight blades. Like "Spoil one" pointed out though, I do use Victornox on the boat. They are a great disposable knife, I buy them in bulk.

  7. #7
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dillingham, AK
    Posts
    2,482

    Default

    I'm not much on serrated blades in general, but I've not used the Cutco serrated knife. I'll say that serrated blades can be a beast to resharpen...
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Love the serrated Cutco, literally wore my last one out. After sending it back to them to be resharpened they sent me a new one last time. I find the knife easily will stay sharp for three animals. I love the serrated edge have no trouble skinning with it and have skinned dozens of bears with it. Like the soft, sticky grip of the handle the orange handle has saved me from loosing it more than once. I have started using a Havalon for about everything but removing the head form the neck.

    Also found a roofing blade in a lightweight utility knife handle to be unbeatable for making long cuts.







    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  9. #9

    Default

    Appreciate the thoughts. Steve, I thought you might weigh in with some insights. I think it was your comments from many months back that stayed in my mind.

    I really do fully understand the advantages of serrations. The points actually focus pressure there, and make cutting through tough materials an easier task. Never having used serrations in a butchering job, I had to wonder: Would the serrations grab hair when making the initial skinning cuts down the back and legs? Would the serrations be "grabby" and less smooth for the actual hide pulling and skinning? Does bone contact (again, think moose) round-off or dull the serrations?

    As far as sharpening....forget it. No way I am taking the time to sit and painstakingly redo this type of edge. Cutco has a forever-sharp guarantee and will sharpen the knife to factory edge at no charge. I look at this as a specialty knife...not for general use. I would use it in-season for big game chores, and then send it in later to be sharpened.

    I should add that...imo...a knife's grip is almost as important as its blade. When working a moose solo, I demand a knife that does not fatigue my hand unnecessarily. A nice hand-filling and contoured grip is great. Kraton is the best thing invented, next to sliced tenderloin!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia, south/east corner.
    Posts
    69

    Default

    After reading about the Cutco's here I bought a straight and a d/d edge. both with orange handles.

    I like both of them when working on our Sambar deer that have skin up to 1/2" thick, and as they wallow, often very gritty/muddy and capable of taking the edge off any knife extra quick.

    The d/d serrated edge keeps on keeping on, it holds an edge when the straight edge needs a touch on the steel to continue use.

    (BTW.......I see Havalon has a new & longer skinner knife, round 9 1/2" overall length ... blades dearer than the existing models.)

    Must send my 2 Cutcos in for resharpen, the sambar season is on the go......its Winter here !

  11. #11

    Default

    Love my serrated cutco. Also love that they'll sharpen it for me!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia, south/east corner.
    Posts
    69

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sambar from Oz. View Post
    After reading about the Cutco's here I bought a straight and a d/d edge. both with orange handles.

    I like both of them when working on our Sambar deer that have skin up to 1/2" thick, and as they wallow, often very gritty/muddy and capable of taking the edge off any knife extra quick.

    The d/d serrated edge keeps on keeping on, it holds an edge when the straight edge needs a touch on the steel to continue use.

    (BTW.......I see Havalon has a new & longer skinner knife, round 9 1/2" overall length ... blades dearer than the existing models.)

    Must send my 2 Cutcos in for resharpen, the sambar season is on the go......its Winter here !
    Just to clarify prev. post....HAVALON Baracuta Blaze, 10 3/8" OAL, Blade 4 3/8", weight 3 oz.

  13. #13
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    717

    Default

    The serrated Cutco is a great moose butchering knife. They are scary sharp and stay that way for a long time. A serrated Cutco combined with a Havalon or Victorinox paring knife for the detailed work and you can take on any game. I might add a third knife for fleshing if on a bear hunt.

  14. #14

    Default

    Ive had mine for almost 20 years. One one trip i used it to help butcher 12 black tail. I cut right through the rib bones slicing them off in racks. I found there is a hairline edge over the serrations that you can straighten back out from the flat side of the blade with a steel.
    Last year a cutco guy came to sell me a knife, I was so impressed with my old one, I bought the whole kitchen butcher block set, a fillet knife and he threw in the serrated pocket knife and cheese knife for the wife. I grabbed my old one and cut the rope they demo with just as the new one did, then he sharpened it for me.

    I guess i'm sold on them.

  15. #15

    Default

    I have a Cutco serrated drop point with orange handle. Last year I skinned & quartered & moose, skinned & quartered 2 black bears plus popped out their heads & paws. This year so far I have skinned & quartered & popped out the head & paws of a black bear. No problems, hasn't needed to be resharpened. Would be nice if they made a full size lock blade. I will be getting the smaller lock blade in serrated. Looking foreward to more critters.

  16. #16

    Default

    I tried a serrated blade on a Buffalo helping a friend and hated it the hair clogged the blade constintley I do use a cutco straight blade for a skinner and love it. Last year I helped work on three moose before I hit it on the steel

  17. #17

    Default

    These answers basically reflect what I thought. The serrated Cutco is a heck of a cut and butcher knife...but a little tricky to skin with, due to grabbing hair. That said, I haven't ever seen anyone slice the back of a moose from neck to rump and not manage to cut off a little hair on the way. A lot of hair is unnecessary and I take pains to do a clean skin job. At least coarse moose hair is easy to see and remove from fresh meat.

    Incidentally, last year I used a Spyderco Bill Moran fixed blade drop point to butcher my moose. I was phenomenally pleased with how comfortable this knife is, and how well it retains its edge. It beat the daylights out of my folders, which always tire my hand and need touched up every so often.

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,022

    Default

    Straight blades are my choice for field work. The only time I prefer a serated blade is for rope/cord , cardboard, bread, things of that nature. As for Cutco knives, I think they are a great product and earn bonus points from me being that they are made in America. I have been building a kitchen set of Cutco's. The ones I own now still have the factory edge on them after a year with an ocaissional run across a diamond stick.

  19. #19

    Default

    I tried the cutco serrated blade on a black bear last year and found it worthless. My wife gave it to me as a gift and I returned it because I felt that it was a waste of money. I will forever stick to strait blades, they are easier to sharpen and I feel that they make better cits. Why carry two knives (As mentioned below) when I can carry one that will do the job on everything?

    As a disclaimer, we have the kitchen Cutco knife set and love them. Great knives, just not in serated for a hunting knife.

  20. #20
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    wasilla ak
    Posts
    640

    Default

    serrated might be good for cutting rope.....straight edge is where its at for skinning animals
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •