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Thread: peppers

  1. #1
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    Default peppers

    How do I get my peppers to produce. I don't have any problems with other plants. The peppers plants grow fairly decent but they just don't produce. The one year I got lucky with them they went and contracted aphids half way thru the season. I keep them in the greenhouse

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    A friend of mine had trouble with his indoor peppers until he was told they needed to be shaken for the flowers to pollenate and produce peppers.
    He started vibrating the branches near the flowers with the back of a electric toothbrush briefly once a day.
    Worked great and he was getting peppers shortly afterwards.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  3. #3
    Member Alaska Grandma's Avatar
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    I have found that usually the first flower or two do not set. After that they seems to go OK. I also help with the pollination by tickling them with a soft paint brush. Sometimes temps (especially night temps) play a roll just like it does with tomatoes.

    Good luck,
    Grandma Lori
    If God had intended us to follow recipes,
    He wouldn't have given us grandmothers. ~Linda Henley

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    I tried for several years to grow peppers in the green house and all I ever got was a green house full of aphids. They would always flower well and even start developing peppers, but the aphids would weaken the area around the base of the flower or pepper and they would eventually fall off. I tried everything I could think of or was told to use to kill the aphids, but nothing worked very well. I eventually gave up. My father-in-law grows Habanero's for me down in PA. and they always do very, very well. He's never even seen an aphed, doesn't even know what they look like. Lucky him...Although the more I think about it, maybe he's not so lucky, he lives in PA. after all:-)

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    I got aphids the first time I ever tried to grow peppers. Did everything I could think of to get rid of them, but it was no good. I gave up on peppers for a few years and just tried them again last year. No aphids. Don't know why. I didn't do anything different than I did before. I also do mine in the greenhouse. Last year I planted nothing but serranos (4 plants) and had so many we could hardly keep up with them (and we love peppers). This year I have 1 jalapeno, 1 serrano, and 2 habaneros. The jalapeno and serrano are already blooming and I even have 1 pretty decent size pepper on the jalapeno. The habaneros look like they are going to start blooming any day now. No aphids yet.

    I didn't have any issues with pollination last year, but my greenhouse isn't sealed up real tight, so I do get bees in there.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Wasp will kill and eat aphids, if you don't poison them.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garnede View Post
    Wasp will kill and eat aphids, if you don't poison them.
    Ladybugs supposedly do also, and that was the first thing I did in my greenhouse, released a bunch of ladybugs. It didn't work.

  8. #8
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    I always plant a pepper in the GH. I keep a close watch on it, aphid attack it first.
    As soon as I see any on it, it spray with soapy water, if they persist, I pull it & toss it.& dump boiling water in the soil around where it was.
    I learned to not leave the door open & screen the louver & I just open the window on the screen door on sunny days.
    One year aphids so bad & had them on everything, it got ugly in there. Did the 100 lady bug thing, I'm sure they ate well but were no match for Alaska aphids.
    You have to shake the plant to pollenate the blooms, or soft paint brush.

  9. #9
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    The predators breed slower than the aphids. If you spray when you notice damage, that means that the aphid population is in full swing and the predators are mostly in the larval stage. The aphids are there long before you notice them, once you notice damage it means that the aphids are rampant. Spraying will kill the larval predators too, especially the larval ladybug, which eats more aphids than the adults. To beat them you have to be willing to tolerate some damage while the predators catch up, or willing to spray constantly, and eventually loose the plant. Or you can introduce predators before you notice any damage.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Most of my 100 lady bugs spent most of their time escaping from the GH.
    I think I had a few by seasons end. Never had any the next year. Guessing the winters
    are too cold & long to have them winter over. Ants & spiders can keep up with a few.
    I keep screens on louvers & have had better success. If the pepper shows aphids, I get tough quick.
    I also don't have birch trees close, & if I'm in the woods or messing with birch, I try to not go in the GH
    for a while & brush off well if I do. Lupine is another plant aphids love,
    I got rid of mine, (well the aphids did most of the work for me)
    Fireweed is also a good food for aphids. They cluster near the top bloom.
    I'm now vigilant in looking for them in the garden & GH, I know I have a few on the lettuce & broc but
    if I notice a major infestation, I attack with both barrels blazing.
    The one time they took over the GH, it was a mess, it was ugly, it was gross & I don't want to go thru that again.
    When I noticed they attack peppers first, I now use peppers for my aphid detector.
    Some years the pepper makes it, some years it don't but worth the sacrifice IMO .

  11. #11
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    So far, so good with the peppers this year. I'll be picking my first serranos in a couple days, and I've got a few small jalapenos just starting. Habaneros are just beginning to bloom.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

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