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Thread: Favorite halibut Jig

  1. #1
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default Favorite halibut Jig

    I love the 24oz lead head with the lime green/chartuse green grub.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Default grouper jigs

    I like, and only use the grouper jigs from basspro shops in various colors and weights. Uncle josh pork trailer and baby octopus for "flavor". That is all I have used for 12 years in PWS. For u freshwater fishermen, it is rigged Carolina style.

  3. #3

    Default Halibut Jib

    An 8 - 12 oz lead head jig with a white rubber scampi style tail.

  4. #4

    Thumbs up 2nd to Ak Gray

    Those lead head jigs in either the 24oz or 16oz are a sure bet (depending on depth and current).

    My personal favorite is the curly tail glow-in-the-dark body, however, the largest fish that has been taken on my boat was with the green/chartruese (sp?) curly tail body style.

    For fishing in shallow waters (say around 100 ft) for the most action, throw on one of those 4.75 oz wilson darts (needlefish). Those 'needlefish' will out fish everything. Period. The only downside to them is that they catch everything (halibut, lings, rockfish, gray cod, irish lords, octopus, skates, . . . you get the picture). That is a 'downside' you ask? Yes, while you definitely have a chance of catching a nice keeper fish, you have a much better chance of catching something else. Sure, it is fun to catch a lot of fish, but while you are reeling up your 4th or 5th ping-pong paddle, your buddy finally hooks up with a 40# keeper.

    Also, if you have much of a current, because they are so light, you must either keep playing line out and 'walking' the jig back away from the boat, or keep reeling it up and dropping it back down.

    -- Gambler

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    Default i agree

    I agree. those little needlefish metal jigs are the ticket, in my opinion. I put them on a bit smaller rod (like one for sturgeon or a heavy king rod) and 60-80# braided line - because I can then cast the jig "upcurrent" of the boat, or just drop it down at slack tide. It almost always has a fish before it gets to the bottom, or just as it hits. You're right, the fish love it so much that you literally catch everything out there. You have to weed through some little guys, but it will catch big fish too. It also allows you to get a look at what is stealing your halibut bait off nibble by nibble, and the smaller rod lets you cast and have fun with 2-10 pounders. A big fish is a battle, but a lot of fun. I recommend trying it sometime.
    Mark

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    never thought of using a pork trailer.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  7. #7
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    Default pork trailer

    Uncle Josh pork trailers soaked in herring oil is irresistable and stays on. After a few soaks just change it out. They come in different sizes and colors.

  8. #8
    Charterboat Operator
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    Default B2 squid

    16 oz B2 squid have been the most productive on my boat, they are almost impossible to find. Many of the jigs that i have had have all broken the wire leader between the lead and the hook. GREAT jig, just not the sturdiest design. Have been working on modifying a solid lead body-hook design to work for thee skirt that is still available.
    Darts/ needlefish are a great stand by for me also but unless you are parked at a honey hole i never even break them out.

  9. #9

    Default Jig

    12 oz. B2 tripple glo squid with scent chamber. I put a few in a bucket with herring oil. Lots of halibut, lings and yellow eye have been caught with it.

  10. #10
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Default

    I like 16 - 24 oz. lead head jigs with Berkely Power Bait 8" grub tails. The grub tails aren't very durable, but they sure catch fish.

    I also like 7-10 oz metal Stinger jigs, butterfly rigged, and smeared with some herring scented Lunker Lotion. I fish them with my 6'-6" Loomis musky rods and 65 or 80# braid. This set-up is just plain fun, but the tides have to be right to keep the lighter jigs on the bottom.

  11. #11
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    Default

    I like the lighter jig rods also, gets to be quite the clutter carrying 14 rods just for butts on board, but the fun makes it all worth while!

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    I like em all leadheads with grub tales, scampi tales, hoochies, crippled herring, wilson darts and diamond jigs, and haven't fished them enough to have a favorite. Somedays they'll hit anything, other days they are picky. One time we were in a hole that was thick with butts, and they kept laying on my leadheads to hide them, which led to me belly hooking several. I changed to an 8oz diamond jig (slack tide), would hit bottom, real up 2 cranks, and on the 2nd or 3rd jig I'd have a hookup. I got tired after about a dozen.

  13. #13
    Member DMan's Avatar
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    Default

    Mostly just use a 16oz jig with a white tail. I KILLED the silvers last fall with silver buzz bombs!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  14. #14
    Member AKCAPT's Avatar
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    Default depends

    Jigging for bottom fish is one of my favorite types of fishing, particularly halibut. As many of the fishermen on this site who have fished with me can attest, the small scampi jig in the hands of a skilled fishermen, will, under most conditions, out-fish bait 10 to 1.
    With that said, we only used 16 – 24 oz jigs when the current won’t allow the smaller jigs and tails to be used.
    Our jigging rods are G.Loomis Bucara 6”6” rods, which is really a musky rod. Short and stiff. A small level drag reel like an accurate 270 or Avet JX. We use 50 pound Berkley super braid line with a four foot, 80 pound monofilament top shot. The mono will save your hands from the braid. This set up is light enough to float a 6 – 8 oz jig down 250 feet in some current. If the current is too strong we will switch up to 10 – 12 oz. Don't worry about the line angle, even if it iscoped way out, it you can feel the bottom, thats all that matters.
    My feeling on the larger jig heads is that the halibut, especially big hog halibut shake the jigs loose too often on the heavier jigs. The more weight the easier it is for them to work against it.
    This year we are having a new mold made that will have stainless cable running though the lead part of the jig. I am going to crimp a swivel at one end, the end where the eye is on a normal jig head. On the business end, we are going to crimp a hook on a swivel. We will thread the hook into the scampi tail and slide it up to a barb on the jig head. We are thinking that will not only create much more action on the tail but also be much harder for the fish to shake loose. The mold may be done before the sportsman show, maybe not. I will take photos and post it when we finish it.

  15. #15

    Thumbs up Save a couple of those for me AKCAPT

    Not sure if you need additional help testing those, but sign me up if you do!

    In my mind, those sound like a great compromise and can only help improve the catch rate.

    I will also have to agree with the larger lead-head jigs being easier for the halibut to throw. Guess I never really thought about it, but it is true. When we have used a lighter lead-head jig, our catch rate was noticeably higher than when we used the 24oz lead-head. Our hookups were fairly constant, but we had a much higher chance of losing the fish with the heavier head. Always figured we just hadn't set the hook well enough.

    -- Gambler

  16. #16
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default large scampit tails on

    300#mono with a circle hook. make my own rigs, not a jig though. last summer every day we fished we got our limit in a few hours, of the bigger fish. We had our limit so fast the one time we had a ton of bait left and my brother said we are staying until the bait is gone.

    to get the scampi tail, i think called the big 10 or something. got them at sportsmans warehouse. use a coat hanger to shove through the thick rubber, then clamp on the swives and circle hook and done deal. Why not put circle hooks on your jigs? I have also made up a deal with a swivel that goes to the line, a swivel for a weight and then a clasp for the bait, the mono about 2' long with the above. should take a picture and post it. but i think with my swivel set up i might have a money maker there. never seen anything like it, just mine.

  17. #17
    Member Jan from Humboldt's Avatar
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    Default A source for B2 squid


  18. #18
    Member Snagger's Avatar
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    Default

    I favor the B-2 squids because they have the swivel on the hook, glow in the dark and have the scent pouch. Bought some cheapo 2 hook jigs with swivel hooks at Walmart last summer and they performed nicely, cant remember what they were called.

  19. #19
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    Default

    [QUOTE=Dan in Alaska;75070]I like 16 - 24 oz. lead head jigs with Berkely Power Bait 8" grub tails. The grub tails aren't very durable, but they sure catch fish.

    Try adding a zip tie around the grub to hold it on the jig better Makes the grubs last three times as long.
    Whenever we are bait fishing I always tie on a second line coming off the swivel that holds a small jig. 80% of the time the jig catches the fish.
    Tennessee

  20. #20
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    Default

    "It almost always has a fish before it gets to the bottom, or just as it hits."

    well that sounds like a good place to fish...

    nobody fishin' the Kodiak Custom? Just because they don't sell 'em in your local shop don't mean they aint local! uncle josh eh?...

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